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Thread: Throttle body sync: Manometer requirements?

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  1. #1
    Riding Dutchman jacco's Avatar
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    Throttle body sync: Manometer requirements?

    Hello,

    I'd like to do my own throttle body sync so that I don't have to spend the entire Saturday at the dealer again (busy summer season). From what I read on ibmwr.org it seems fairly easy to do, all I need to get is a differential manometer. What are the requirements for such a manometer, apart from two inputs so that it can do differential? I'd like to get a digital one if they're not too expensive. What are the requirements? E.g. range, resolution. Anything else I need to know before I start on this project? A manometer is the only 'special' tool I'll need, correct?

    Thanks,
    Jacco

  2. #2
    Has the GS-Lust The_Veg's Avatar
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    Well, you could build one from a yardstick and about 20 feet of clear plastic tubing. This will cost you about $4.
    2012 R1200GS

    "If you can't fix it with a hammer, it's electrical." -somebody's dad

  3. #3
    Riding Dutchman jacco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Veg
    Well, you could build one from a yardstick and about 20 feet of clear plastic tubing. This will cost you about $4.
    I know. But there are cheap used manometers on eBay. I've never done a throttle body sync, that's why I'm trying to determine what kind of range/sensitivity I'll need. I don't mind investing a few (say up to 50) dollars to compensate for my lack of skill.

    Thanks anyway ,
    Jacco

  4. #4
    leave my monkey alone LORAZEPAM's Avatar
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    the manometers are cheaper, and easy to use, but the best too overall would be a twinmax. It is a true differential tool, and the mercury manometers use a separate tube for each TB. You have to get the tubes rising equally when balancing, and you aim for zero on the twinmax. I use the manometer for quite a while, and since I bought the twinmax, they are collecting dust now.
    Gale Smith
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  5. #5
    Riding Dutchman jacco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorazepam
    the manometers are cheaper, and easy to use, but the best too overall would be a twinmax. It is a true differential tool, and the mercury manometers use a separate tube for each TB. You have to get the tubes rising equally when balancing, and you aim for zero on the twinmax. I use the manometer for quite a while, and since I bought the twinmax, they are collecting dust now.
    Thanks lorazepam. I read about the twinmax on ibmwr.org. Costs about $100 I think? But it seems that most digital dual-input manometers are also capable of computing the differential pressure between their two inputs. I was wondering if this would be a valid alternative (new approx. $200, but less when used, for example on eBay), since I could potentially use it for something else as well. But they come in a whole spectrum of ranges/sensitivities. I don't suppose we're talking tens of PSIs here, but to be honest I have no idea, really...

    Regards,
    Jacco

  6. #6
    leave my monkey alone LORAZEPAM's Avatar
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    I have seen the twinmax listed from 79.00 to around 90.00. To me it is a no brainer tool, and makes the job so easy. I cannot comment on the digital manometer units, having no experience with them, but more than one mechanic has said that the twinmax is their tool of choice for the job.
    Gale Smith
    2009 Versys
    1999 R1100RT

  7. #7
    Aspiring Profligate jeff488's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Veg View Post
    Well, you could build one from a yardstick and about 20 feet of clear plastic tubing. This will cost you about $4.
    +1
    What I did. Works great.
    I did cough up the extra for a yellow aluminum yardstick. Looks really cool with the red ATF.
    '04 Silver R1150RT "Big Oel". '05 Yellow KLR 650
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  8. #8
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    Twinmax

    Been there, done that with homemade and mercury stiks.
    pay the shot and buy the twinmax. It will take all the guesswork out of things and your bike will run far better.

    Best,

    Will

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    Nothing works better than pure physics fluidics and gravity. I did the ATF in tubing on a stick and you cannot get more accurate results IMHO

  10. #10
    Day Dreaming ... happy wanderer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoomtoob View Post
    Nothing works better than pure physics fluidics and gravity. I did the ATF in tubing on a stick and you cannot get more accurate results IMHO
    I agree that a 2X4 with tubing filled with ATF will get the job done cheap but having tried that type of jig (bulky), mercury stix (health/environmental hazard), Twin Max (bouncy) I much prefer Grok's Harmonizer.

    I also agree that while I may not necessarily get more accurate results I think it is possible to get equally accurate results in a much smaller and convenient package that I can actually ride around the neighbourhood with to check my handiwork live and in colour with my Harmonizer on the bike.

    I can't do that with a 2X4 and twenty feet of tubing. Might be fun to try though!
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
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  11. #11
    Registered User GKman's Avatar
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    I also used the plastic tube and brake fluid after a throttle cable replacement. Started so far off it was sucking all of the fluid from one side and heading for the engine. It actually sucked a long bubble through the fluid. Improved the rough adjustment, got in range and it worked fine. What is the yardstick for? I don't need a yardstick to see level.

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