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Thread: Trailering K1300s

  1. #1
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    Trailering K1300s

    I am considering trailering my 2010 K1300s part way to the 2015 rally in Billings, MT. Having never trailered a bike before, I may do a dry run to ensure that I am comfortable securing, loading and unloading the bike. I have a center stand and would like to know if it is preferable to tie the bike down while it rests on the center stand, or not. And any other tips on securing a K-bike would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    We have a toy hauler rv that we add two K12S's to a few times a year.

    A good wheel chock that locks the wheel is a bonus while loading and for peace of mind. Have used/not used a chock...the chock just makes the process easier and the wheel in place if a really big bump is encountered.

    We use two soft tie down loops on the front forks above the fender, then hook the ratchet straps to those and the trailer tiedown points. The bike will ride on a bit compressed suspension. No straps rubbing on any fairing bits.

    On the rear, a soft tie strap around the square tube frame, then to the ratchet tie downs...not the aluminum foot peg castings.On our trailers the tie downs are placed to pull the bike into the chock.

    Now the other question...your trailer and what type or a rental and what type?

    Also, no center stand. It puts unusual stress on it and reduces the bikes contact spot since at least one wheel is now off the deck.
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

  3. #3
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Here's a couple pics of a friend's K1200S showing the tie down points Steve mentioned.







    Here's a pic of a Baxley Chock.



    Here's another pic showing the forward pull of the front straps, a Baxley Chock, and a strap running through the rear wheel to hold down the back of the bike.

    Lee 2011 K1300S
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by henzilla View Post
    We have a toy hauler rv that we add two K12S's to a few times a year.

    A good wheel chock that locks the wheel is a bonus while loading and for peace of mind. Have used/not used a chock...the chock just makes the process easier and the wheel in place if a really big bump is encountered.

    We use two soft tie down loops on the front forks above the fender, then hook the ratchet straps to those and the trailer tiedown points. The bike will ride on a bit compressed suspension. No straps rubbing on any fairing bits.

    On the rear, a soft tie strap around the square tube frame, then to the ratchet tie downs...not the aluminum foot peg castings.On our trailers the tie downs are placed to pull the bike into the chock.

    Now the other question...your trailer and what type or a rental and what type?

    Also, no center stand. It puts unusual stress on it and reduces the bikes contact spot since at least one wheel is now off the deck.
    Thanks much. I'll be renting from UHaul so my next step is to take a look at what they have for trailers. Appreciate the advice about the center stand.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee View Post
    Here's a couple pics of a friend's K1200S showing the tie down points Steve mentioned.







    Here's a pic of a Baxley Chock.



    Here's another pic showing the forward pull of the front straps, a Baxley Chock, and a strap running through the rear wheel to hold down the back of the bike.

    Thanks for the pictures. I went to the the Baxley site and now I'm wondering if I might be better off with one of their trailers. The tilt feature looks like it would make loading and unloading safe and easy.

  6. #6
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sjmyott View Post
    Thanks for the pictures. I went to the the Baxley site and now I'm wondering if I might be better off with one of their trailers. The tilt feature looks like it would make loading and unloading safe and easy.
    I've seen one of the Baxley trailers and it looked like a nice setup.

    Another item I've seen that makes for an easy way to hold a bike on a trailer is the PitBull Trailer Restraint.

    http://stores.sportbiketrackgear.com/Detail.bok?no=6940

    http://www.pit-bull.com/mm5/merchant...ler_restraints
    Lee 2011 K1300S
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  7. #7
    Registered User 58058D's Avatar
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    If you get a sport chock, stay away from the one from cyclegear, spend the money for the Baxley. I hauled my K13S many times to the track, then sold it and got a track only bike. Same front tire size - the Cyclegear one was for a 100 or 110 tire, not the 120. I had to have a bystander help me unwedge the bike from the stand....many other horror stories on that thing... The photos Lee and others have posted show exactly how I strapped mine in and as Henzilla says and the photos show, leave the center stand up. For the front, I used the same type Lee shows for his rear strap, a short strap with a loop at each end that your hook goes through. Just be careful of the brake line. Rather than the chock, what I used in my truck bed, was made of 2x4's. One across the front bolted to my headache rack posts, then two pieces going down vertical from near the center with 45 degree diagonal bracing, then 45 degree wedge cut on two short horizontal pieces just the right distance apart for the front wheel to contact them on their angle cut while also contacting the front wall (like ther front piece of the Baxley). This kept the front wheel from moving as I ratcheted down and/or during transport. Before I did that, I used extra straps to tie the front wheel to the tie downs and that was not foolproof. U-Haul rents small trailers that have the slot for your front wheel. Every U-Haul place I have seen has them and all the U-Haul trailers I have seen at the track are of this variety. Already has all the points for securing, just add bike and tie downs. I actually dont use the ratchet style, I just really pull on the 'gripper' style straps. Oh, and I just walk the bike up my ramp under power, throw a leg over while I grab the pre-staged side straps to hold it upright as I do the rest. The U-Haul trailer would be soooo easy. Oh, and I live where I have to go 3 hours on very twisty windy roads to get to the track and my load has never been a problem using the above techniques, and I don't drive slow.

    Have a great trip!
    Jim Douglas '00 K1200RS >135,000 miles my primary bike again,
    Gone: '09 K1300S sold @ 22k mi, '93 K1100RS traded @ 78k mi, '85 K100RS sold @ 44k mi
    '06 Kaw 650R track bike sold
    http://www.seagullbb.com/

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee View Post

    Note, a trailer must have the center of the weight in front of the axle to be stable. That bike is very far back, I would be concerned about weaving at high speeds. I have seen wrecks from this, including my very own dad.

    If it were me, I would move the bike forward one foot.

    Rod

  9. #9
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ragtoplvr View Post
    Note, a trailer must have the center of the weight in front of the axle to be stable. That bike is very far back, I would be concerned about weaving at high speeds. I have seen wrecks from this, including my very own dad.
    I don't remember how much tongue weight the trailer had but it was enough. The RS is front heavy.
    The owner used a scale to check the tongue weight.
    Lee 2011 K1300S
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  10. #10
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    Does K1300S owners manual have tie down instructions?
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  11. #11
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    Does K1300S owners manual have tie down instructions?
    I don't think so. None of the manuals for any of our BMWs has.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  12. #12
    Registered User 58058D's Avatar
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    My K13S manual did not have anything about tying it down. All the photos above, though, show clearly how so many of us have successfully hauled this model, and with a minimum of straps needed.
    Jim Douglas '00 K1200RS >135,000 miles my primary bike again,
    Gone: '09 K1300S sold @ 22k mi, '93 K1100RS traded @ 78k mi, '85 K100RS sold @ 44k mi
    '06 Kaw 650R track bike sold
    http://www.seagullbb.com/

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