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Thread: Tall guy on a 98 K12RS

  1. #1
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    Tall guy on a 98 K12RS

    I'm tempted by a k12rs. It's 6 hours away. 22k new clutch and rear main seal. At 6'4" will I fit? Other issues with the early KRS?

  2. #2
    Kein Nasebohrer RBEmerson's Avatar
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    6' 1" works just fine on an '03 K1200RS. A couple of days ago, a friend (on an R1200RT) and I did a 320+ mile trip on a mix of twisties and Interstate, with winds in the 20-25 MPH (probably gusting higher). No worries. My favored riding position is to slide back in the saddle a bit, and keep the balls of my feet on the pegs. This straightens the arms out for better support and allows gripping the tank with my knees (Wunderlich America sells a model specific set of grip patches - highly recommended, along with their side stand foot pad). Also, cruise control allows giving your right hand a rest (to say nothing keep constant speed where needed). I rely on the linked brakes to execute braking with the front grip (works just fine even in panic stops - no need to stomp on rear brake pedal), and always cover the brake and clutch levers with two fingers each. YMMV

    Oh, yeah - at 6' 4" you can easily flat foot the bike and stand up at lights. It's an easy way to get a quick stretch in and rest your seat bone. [/grin]

    I can't help with info on the '98 but based on what little you said (please add price? tires? any other particulars? photo(s)?), I'd take a look at it. In general, I'd look closely at the rubber parts - 20+ years means "dry rot" (really damage induced by ozone in the air). In particular, it won't hurt to move to stainless steel brake and clutch lines. The air and cooling hoses may or may not need attention. If the tires are relatively new, you're good there (inflate to 38 PSI front, 42 PSI rear). If they're more than a few years old, look hard at the side walls for cracking (dry rot).

    The really big issue is the fuel tank quick disconnects. BMW used plastic parts; the question isn't "if they fail" but "when they fail". Failure could mean anything from a stopped engine to gas all over a hot engine. None of it is good news. There are a number of after market sources for the QD's. I'm partial to Beemer Boneyard but there are any number of sources - pick one.

    The way to verify what the QD's are made of is to look into the upper left opening on the right (brake) side around the engine. If you see shiny metal fittings, end of story. If you see white plastic, replace them or have the job done (pull "tupperware", remove gas tank, replace fittings with the right "gender" fittings in the right places, replace tank, replace tupperware).
    Don't let your bike go anywhere your brain hasn't already been five seconds ago...

  3. #3
    IBA# 5819 61996's Avatar
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    Late reply

    I'm 6'3" and am very comfortable on my 99 K12RS. Lots of ergonomic adjustments for you to tinker with. Seat, pegs, shift lever, handlebars etc.
    There are lots of web based resources available with info on buying used K's. MOA is a good start.
    I think pre-2000 K12's did not come with quick disconnects so you probably don't have to worry too much.

    Good luck

    Joe
    Last edited by 61996; 04-12-2014 at 02:17 AM.
    If life throws you a curve; lean into it.

  4. #4
    Kein Nasebohrer RBEmerson's Avatar
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    At the risk of seeming to beat a very sick looking horse, it can't hurt to check for QD's. If there are none, at least part of the bike has gotten a good looking over. If there are QD's and they aren't checked... well, we've been over that scorched earth...

    IMHO, it's best to ride a bike for a while (several hundred miles - honest) before tweaking the ergonomics. Any bike feels strange when you first get on it. After a some riding, the strangeness passes. If there's something that rubs or aches even after building a good acquaintance with the bike, by all means go for changes. But slapping on changes just because "everybody" says they've done it...? Nah. Ride your own ride and let "everybody" ride their ride.
    Don't let your bike go anywhere your brain hasn't already been five seconds ago...

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