Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: 2010 F650GS Twin High First Gear

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    34

    2010 F650GS Twin High First Gear

    My wife is having issues on off-road down hills controlling her 650 due to that high first gear. Any fixes out there for this.
    Thanks
    Mark

  2. #2
    Lost again Texpaul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    San Antonio, Tx
    Posts
    448
    You could lower the gearing by dropping a tooth on the counter sprocket. I did that for my wife's bike because it was geared too tall for low speed work. Problem was it made it buzzy at hiway speed so went back to original ratio. Ended up adding a booster plug, which boosted low end pull but have no idea how it would effect downhill decel.
    Paul Mulhern
    MOA# 56330
    '05 1200GS Big Blue

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    34

    Thanks for the input

    I have heard of both those options you mentioned and how the smaller sprocket made it run different at high speed. I am curious though if the booster plug would help on downhill control. Maybe someone out there would have some experience with the booster plug and downhill travel. I will stay tuned

  4. #4
    rick_k@49423 F650GS 2005 rickkraai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    West Michigan
    Posts
    3

    High First Gear alternative

    Besides a lower counter sprocket, you can increase the size (number of teeth) on the drive gear. I forget the standard rear gear, but guess it to be near 70 teeth. Adding two teeth (to 72) lowers total gearing about 3%. Conversely, change the counter sprocket from 14 to 13 is a 7% change. Of course, other options are available, and you could change both if you have a target overall gear ratio.
    Ride on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Texpaul View Post
    You could lower the gearing by dropping a tooth on the counter sprocket. I did that for my wife's bike because it was geared too tall for low speed work. Problem was it made it buzzy at hiway speed so went back to original ratio. Ended up adding a booster plug, which boosted low end pull but have no idea how it would effect downhill decel.

  5. #5
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    "Big Bend" TX
    Posts
    8,767
    Quote Originally Posted by Telebeamer View Post
    My wife is having issues on off-road down hills controlling her 650 due to that high first gear. Any fixes out there for this.
    Thanks
    Mark
    What is the idle speed, or no load rpm under these conditions? Is it high gearing, or high idle as the root problem?
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

  6. #6
    Small road corner junkie pffog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    WNY, Further fron NYC, than 6 entire states!
    Posts
    2,110
    The Vertical twins have very sensitive throttles just off idle. Several fixes, some cost $$, some cheap. The booster plugs do help, also a popular fix is to change the twist grip barrel, so that it takes more "twist" to pull the cable the same amount at low throttle openings.

    Here is a link to ADV rider,( http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...light=throttle ) LOTS of info. I am going to go the cheap route as soon as we get some spring weather, check out post #34, which achieves the same as the twist grip change, but costs nothing but time, and ingenuity. I plan on doing it a little better then just stuffing a wire in the pully.
    2010 F800GS Full Ohlins package, '04 R1100S Replika
    '01 F650GS Wife's bike
    Maritime Alps and Vosges 2012
    Tuscany and Central Italy 2010

  7. #7
    Riding for the SON
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Pasco Wa.
    Posts
    154
    Quote Originally Posted by Telebeamer View Post
    My wife is having issues on off-road down hills controlling her 650 due to that high first gear. Any fixes out there for this.
    Thanks
    Mark
    A little practice in using the rear brake and in some cased a little front brake.

  8. #8
    Small road corner junkie pffog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    WNY, Further fron NYC, than 6 entire states!
    Posts
    2,110
    Quote Originally Posted by ROYBARNES View Post
    A little practice in using the rear brake and in some cased a little front brake.
    Not bad advice, but one big problem most of us (men) overlook. My big paws can easing grip, twist and feather clutch and brake levers at the same time just using a couple fingers. The problem with many women is there hands are MUCH smaller and they are at full extension just reaching and activating the brake/clutch levers and don't have much left for the other functions. The ah-ha realization for me was watching the wife struggle starting from a stop on hills.

    Try choking up with your hands so your finger tips just reach the lever and see how well you can modulate the levers with just your finger tips.
    2010 F800GS Full Ohlins package, '04 R1100S Replika
    '01 F650GS Wife's bike
    Maritime Alps and Vosges 2012
    Tuscany and Central Italy 2010

  9. #9
    Riding for the SON
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Pasco Wa.
    Posts
    154
    Quote Originally Posted by pffog View Post
    Not bad advice, but one big problem most of us (men) overlook. My big paws can easing grip, twist and feather clutch and brake levers at the same time just using a couple fingers. The problem with many women is there hands are MUCH smaller and they are at full extension just reaching and activating the brake/clutch levers and don't have much left for the other functions. The ah-ha realization for me was watching the wife struggle starting from a stop on hills.

    Try choking up with your hands so your finger tips just reach the lever and see how well you can modulate the levers with just your finger tips.
    Check lever adjustment. They can be adjusted for a shorter reach. Push lever forward and adjust the little dial for a closer reach.

  10. #10
    Small road corner junkie pffog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    WNY, Further fron NYC, than 6 entire states!
    Posts
    2,110
    Quote Originally Posted by ROYBARNES View Post
    Check lever adjustment. They can be adjusted for a shorter reach. Push lever forward and adjust the little dial for a closer reach.
    Been there done that 8 years ago, and the play in the clutch is as much as can be dialed in and still be able to fully disengage it. Brake lever is a close as it can get. It is a simple matter of anatomy that makes operation different, and more difficult.
    2010 F800GS Full Ohlins package, '04 R1100S Replika
    '01 F650GS Wife's bike
    Maritime Alps and Vosges 2012
    Tuscany and Central Italy 2010

  11. #11
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    1,765
    Quote Originally Posted by ROYBARNES View Post
    A little practice in using the rear brake and in some cased a little front brake.
    Actually the other way around, lots of front brake with control, and a little rear brake. Going downhill there is little weight on the rear tire and thus the engine braking and the rear wheel brake are of limited use. It really does not matter what the gearing is in this situation since the bike will always run away downhill with little control of the speed if all you rely on engine braking (I do prefer lower gearing on my F800GS for better off road ridability though). If you rely on the rear brake, all you end up doing is skidding the rear tire with little affect on speed, but plenty of affect on directional control. You need to get good at using the front brake and feeling for the lock up point and keeping just out of that zone. If the front wheel slips, you just release a bit of brake to let it start rolling again without releasing totally and allowing the bike to run away. Since most of the bikes weight is on the front tire, there is a ton more traction there than you realize. Of course its also important to ensure you start any descent at a controllable speed. With good control of initial speed and front braking, it should be possible to actually totally stop the bike on almost any hill.
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2009 F800GS
    I can't wait to retire and have a fixed income. The one I have now is always broke.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •