Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: F800GT - okay for tall people?

  1. #1
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    New York State
    Posts
    587

    F800GT - okay for tall people?

    I found a very positive review of the F800GT:

    http://www.wheels.ca/car-reviews/rev...13-bmw-f800gt/

    "I found the riding position very comfortable for my 6-foot-3 frame, and the tubular handlebars let owners turn to the aftermarket for thousands of alternate options."

    I'm 6'4", with a 36" inseam, so having a bike fit me is very important.

    Any tall people wish to comment on riding the F800GT?

    I am aware that a "high comfort seat" is an option for this bike.

    I also put a big emphasis on fuel economy, a strong point for this bike. I'll probably keep my RT for this season, but am seriously considering the F800GT as my next bike.

    thanks,

    Harry
    2003 R1150RT - Silver

  2. #2
    Prefers to play martinph's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Armstrong, BC
    Posts
    688
    Sat on one at the Vancouver Bike show. I am 6'. Tall, 33" inseam and there was not enough room for my knees! The black plastic cover at the front of the tank was in the way.
    Martin. BMW MOA Ambassador.17748
    BMW MOA Charter, Life member.
    Valley BMW Riders. British Columbia.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern New Jersey
    Posts
    622
    I'm the same size as Martin and I also did not like the one I sat on at the NYC show.
    And I did so much want to like it.
    I really think you'll need a R1200RT if you're looking for something newer.
    Same ergos as your 1150.

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    San Tan Valley, Az
    Posts
    216
    I am 6'5" with a 34" inseam. I purchased my GT without a test ride or sit. A few issues.

    The bike is most likely build for someone who is 5" nothing. It required a number of items to be addressed to fit my body.

    First- Needed to lower the pegs, as my knees were up to my chin
    Second- Installed bar backs/risers to have a more upright seating position
    Third- Installed a Madstad windshield, as the stock shield is for display purposes only
    Fourth- Had a Russell Day-Long seat built.

    With these modifications the bike is very enjoyable. I also added a 4.2 gallon fuel cell, so I have a range of 350-400 miles.

    One item with the Russell seat is it puts you a little higher on the bike. Now I have a longer reach to the grips. I am looking at changing the handlebar to get some height back. There is a source in Germany that has a handlebar specific to the GT that does this. I am also looking at the handlebar off a 800GS that looks like it will satisfy my needs.

    I do like the bike, but as you can see I did have to spend additional money to make it fit me.

    I think I am throwing a wrench in the demographics that BMW had in mind as I am retired and very old. I wanted to downsize after I totaled out my 1200GSA. Wanted something smaller, lighter, etc. This bike does fit the bill.

    If you have any questions, ping a way

    bob

  5. #5
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    New York State
    Posts
    587
    Thanks for the replies!

    Bob, what was involved in lowering the foot pegs? Did you have the dealer do it? What company provided the hardware?

    thanks,

    Harry
    2003 R1150RT - Silver

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Wilmington, NC
    Posts
    2,115
    advenbob has it right- I did the same things to the 2 F800GTs the SO and I bought- she's 5"6" and I'm 6 even.
    It absolutely needs barbacks, foot peg lowering, a decent windscreen (the stocker may be the very worst windscreen I've ever seen on any bike).
    The usual barbacks are Motorad Verholen, the lowering from Suburban Machinery, and the 22" MadStad screen.
    You will also want mirror extenders (Hornig) so you see more than your shoulders
    and a side stand foot to keep from breaking the bikes very thin and fragile plastic (compared to any R or K bike). Mine is Wunderlich but there are many.

    Bottom line is the F800GT is an on the cheap adaptation of the ST that sold poorly in the US- its not the F800RT that US riders wanted- or even very close. It makes only changes than can be done without any serious rework of the platform.

    FWIW- I bought the RepROM for the F twins- it has almost nothing on it compared to a similar disc for R or K models- because all the F stuff is as close as possible to each other as the factory can build so the procedures are pretty much the same for everything. These bikes do not get the design attention that the R and K bikes do and are treated pretty much as the side line they are by BMW.

    The reason we have them is the light handling with good brakes- more fun in tight twisties.

    If Kawasaki made their equivalent (4cyl, 1L, 120+ hp) with a shaft or belt or Yamahas new triple was built as a tourer with shaft or belt, either would be a better choice and value. The mid size touring category is ripe for a really decent and modern bike and the F800GT is only a so-so bike, mostly due to the merely adequate motor design. A twin with a balancer is not even close to decent sub for a triple which is IMO the ideal choice for mid size tourer.

  7. #7
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    New York State
    Posts
    587
    Thanks, racer7, for the information. I'll keep your comments in mind when it comes time to evaluate an F800GT as a possible choice.

    Harry
    2003 R1150RT - Silver

  8. #8
    Registered User LDB's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    123
    Is that 4.2 gal. in addition to the original? Can you post photos?
    CCC, NRA, OOIDA Life Member
    BMWMOA Member 15945

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Wilmington, NC
    Posts
    2,115
    I'd second the comment about seeing photos and info on the fuel cell install. Its a almost necessity out west though here in the east we can get by without it.
    The GT has a practical range of only 170-180 miles before you'd better start hunting for fuel- unless you like running on fumes and getting stuck sometimes.
    Compare that to the RTs 225-250 miles on the same basis...

    Like I said, its not an F800RT or even close- but it handles and stops well, has a smooth tranny, and has pretty decent go though the motor is crude and cheaply built- but with a pretty decent FI system - less of the obnoxious lean behavior than most other models. (Sell it before it needs a valve adjustment, unless you really like taking half the bike apart to do one- like too many others it needs the cams removed).

    It also has a very vulnerable oil filter (and heat exchanger though the exchanger is tougher) and an unshielded radiator waiting to be holed by rocks (is a molded plastic shield asking too much?) though at least its not as vulnerable as the soft aluminum rads on the waterboxers..My 89 Transalp looks rugged as heck by comparison.

    The front fender provides almost no useful deflection of water or road debris so an extender is needed and as usual there is no rear hugger so rear spray goes everywhere including on the rear shock..

    Maybe some day BMW will get embarrassed over all the cheap to do, sensible stuff they leave out these days. The F800GT is pretty expensive for all the stuff that's missing- and will cost about $2K more than its already steep price to make it reasonable. Publications have been right to point out that one can do as well for less $ in J brands.

    There are so many market opportunities for J brands to capitalize on the misses of euro brands that's its amazing to me they can't see or hit them. One obvious engineering thing J brands do wrong is the continued use of cheap chain drive on J brand models that should be shaft or belt- I know I'm not the only one who won't own a chain drive touring bike for US use (though I might prefer it for heading to real boonies due to ease of repair). Another J brand problem is weight- they need to learn to seriously cut weight on most of their offerings. I would also trade the convenience of BMWs single side swing arms for the more reliable drives on double side bikes- BMW has made serious miscues on every one of its single side machines at some point so trusting any new one is like religion- based on faith. (The F800GT should have the upgrades after the recall of screwed up earlier belt drives but I haven't personally verified that).

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    San Tan Valley, Az
    Posts
    216
    Racer provided info re the peg lowering, bar backs, etc. I added mirror extenders that are available from BMW's European Authority model that provide brackets to mount driving lights. A very expensive mod. The fuel cell was custom built by Mike Langford, Chula Vista Ca. Here is a link from Mike showing the development of the cell. https://picasaweb.google.com/1078306...?noredirect=1#

    The platform on top of the tank provides room to pack gear when on a long trip. The bags from BMW are nice, but as usual, don't carry much if you are on a multiple day/week trip. Especially a camping trip when adding a tent and sleeping bag. A Motofiz bag along with a Helen's bag strapped on the platform solves that need. If you are riding 2 up, forget the cell. 4 bolts and a QD and the cell is off the bike.

    I also added the side stand foot, and upgraded the suspension with a rear Wilber's shock without the ESA. I also had the Wilber's front springs installed but next week they are coming out and reinstalling the stock springs. Ride was just too stiff.

    The only small head ache is tire wear. The original rear went 7800 miles and presented a problem trying to find a tire in Ely Nv on Memorial Day weekend. Found a tire that would work at a NAPA store and the Goodyear tire store mounted it for $15. Lucky, very lucky.

    With Dunlop Roadtrax I am getting around 10k on the rear. Would like to see closer to 12k and waiting to see how the PR4 works out for some people.

    A decent web site to check on all that is F800 is the F800 forum. Linky:http://f800riders.org/

    There is a lot of information re the peg lowering kit, bar backs, windshield, etc. on that site.

    Bottom line, its is a pretty good bike, typically BMW overpriced, needing additional funds and efforts to make it a good touring bike. Once done, it is a fun bike. I have a little over 26k on the bike in 10 months. Enjoying every mile.
    bob
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #11
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    New York State
    Posts
    587
    Thanks, Bob.

    26K miles on the bike in 10 months sounds very positive to me.

    Harry
    2003 R1150RT - Silver

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •