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Thread: 1983 R100RS Centerstand

  1. #1
    Registered User brasmussen's Avatar
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    1983 R100RS Centerstand

    Greetings!
    As I am getting older and with some lower back problems, I am finding that using my centerstand sometimes is hard on my body. Is there an aftermarket centerstand which does not take as much effort in lifting the bike? Thanks, Bob

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    Smile

    There is the Reynolds Ride-Off although you'd have to find one on FleaBay or such.
    Don't know, however, if it requires less effort (e.g. lifting-effort) to engage. I'll
    let others more learned than I chime in for their expertise. Hope you find something
    to meet your requirements.

  3. #3
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    What is the age of the rear shocks? Tom Cutter reported that the '81 center stands were redesigned to clear the crossover pipe. The resulting geometry changes to the pivots made the center stand almost unusable not to mention that the extra wear-tear damage the pivots over time, making it even worse. An upgrade kit was offered (not no longer available) and the design should have been incorporated in the '83 and '84 models.

    So you could be facing multiple issues with the worn shocks, which makes you lift more of the weight. Also, the pivot areas and bolts could be severely worn. This page should help you figure out which model Reynolds you would need if you go down that road.

    http://w6rec.com/duane/bmw/reynolds/

    Even more extensive info on the Reynolds is located here:

    http://bmwmotorcycletech.info/reynolds.htm
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  4. #4
    MOA #24991 Pauls1150's Avatar
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    Worn shocks and worn stand pivots/bushings are certainly a contribution to this, but don't forget worn front springs, too - if they're sagging, that will also lower the bike and make it more difficult to haul up on the stand. Aftermarket springs (possibly with short spacers on top) are available.

    A minor but worth-a-look contribution is also tire pressure; don't run 'em too soft. Airheads don't typically run "low-profile" tires, but just a reminder to avoid those in this application.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pauls1150 View Post
    Worn shocks and worn stand pivots/bushings are certainly a contribution to this, but don't forget worn front springs, too - if they're sagging, that will also lower the bike and make it more difficult to haul up on the stand. Aftermarket springs (possibly with short spacers on top) are available.

    A minor but worth-a-look contribution is also tire pressure; don't run 'em too soft. Airheads don't typically run "low-profile" tires, but just a reminder to avoid those in this application.
    Certainly not an expert, but on my 78 R100, when I changed tires and went with the factory sizes and not the metric lower profile sizes, it made a huge difference in the effort to put bike on the centerstand.

    You could advertise on the MOA "flea market" section to see if there is any ride-off stand out there to buy from a member.
    "The difference between death and taxes is that death doesn't change every time congress meets." - Will Rogers

  6. #6
    Registered User brasmussen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 20774 View Post
    What is the age of the rear shocks? Tom Cutter reported that the '81 center stands were redesigned to clear the crossover pipe. The resulting geometry changes to the pivots made the center stand almost unusable not to mention that the extra wear-tear damage the pivots over time, making it even worse. An upgrade kit was offered (not no longer available) and the design should have been incorporated in the '83 and '84 models.

    So you could be facing multiple issues with the worn shocks, which makes you lift more of the weight. Also, the pivot areas and bolts could be severely worn. This page should help you figure out which model Reynolds you would need if you go down that road.

    http://w6rec.com/duane/bmw/reynolds/

    Even more extensive info on the Reynolds is located here:

    http://bmwmotorcycletech.info/reynolds.htm

    I appreciate the quick responses. The problem may be partially due to the age of the rear shocks. There is no sign of leakage but the sag is greater than I had anticipated. For my size I was told it should be approx. 1 1/2". I found it to be 2 5/16". The bike has Koni brand shocks which I was told are rebuildable. As far as age goes, they were installed between 1983 and 1997. I am the second owner so I do not know the exact date of installation. Now to make a decision about rebuilding or new.

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    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    We probably have the same vintage Koni shocks...I haven't felt any issues with handling or the center stand (but I do have a Reynolds), however I am beginning to rethink them and may be looking for replacements. As I understand it, Ikon shocks are essentially the same...IIRC Ikon bought the rights...notice the name spelling!!

    As for rebuilding the Konis, there's a link in the Resources and Links thread that might give you some ideas about tackling that job:

    http://mechanicalhusbandry.com/2011/...shock-rebuild/

    Beyond that, there are a reasonable range of replacements although the costs will vary as well.
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 20774 View Post
    We probably have the same vintage Koni shocks...I haven't felt any issues with handling or the center stand (but I do have a Reynolds), however I am beginning to rethink them and may be looking for replacements. As I understand it, Ikon shocks are essentially the same...IIRC Ikon bought the rights...notice the name spelling!!

    As for rebuilding the Konis, there's a link in the Resources and Links thread that might give you some ideas about tackling that job:

    http://mechanicalhusbandry.com/2011/...shock-rebuild/

    Beyond that, there are a reasonable range of replacements although the costs will vary as well.
    My IKON (Koni) shocks last July or August cost $300 a pair.

    However, as I understand it, the "shock" part of the assembly has nothing to do with sagging or not sagging. That is handled by the springs and their preload. The "shock" part is what controls the quickness of the compression (like when hitting a bump) and then the subsequent rebound (extension speed).

    Springs supply pressure, shocks supply rate of compression and extension.
    "The difference between death and taxes is that death doesn't change every time congress meets." - Will Rogers

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