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Thread: Stainless steel fasteners

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntonLargiader View Post

    That ship sailed long ago; BMW has been using SS since the turn of the century for fairings (which is what this thread is about). .
    Yes, the plastic is what this thread was all about. However, like with all threads, there is a tendency to divert into general or related areas. And if you talk about ss fasteners on motor vehicles, I think you need to point as many of the pros and cons as one can.

  2. #17
    It's a way of life! oldnslow's Avatar
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    Anton stated that the 'new' BMW screws don't have a washer. I haven't seen those yet, but I like the little plastic washer on the fairing screws. It keeps the screw head from scratching the paint as the head rotates whilst you secure the fastener. (how many bonus points for using the word 'whilst' in a post?)

    p.s. My dealer, Bentonville BMW, keeps a large supply of these fasteners in stock..all sizes. and yes, a buck fiddy each! I try to buy a few different sizes when I go there, so I will have 'em if I lose them or buggar one up. Three or four at a time doesn't hurt nearly as bad as 25 at a time!
    Mike Davis
    "Old n Slow" It's a way of life!
    1985 K100RT

    1998 R1100RT

  3. #18
    Enjoy The Ride saddleman's Avatar
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    I find used fasteners for complete BMW bikes on e-bay now & then. The last set were all of the fasteners for two complete K1200LT bikes cost $60 with shipping. The package weighed around 20 lbs.
    Dave
    2004 Black LT
    2000 Canyon Red LT
    The Only Vehicles I Own

  4. #19
    . AntonLargiader's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldnslow View Post
    ... I like the little plastic washer on the fairing screws. It keeps the screw head from scratching the paint as the head...
    Believe me, the old style screws with the washers do FAR more damage, because the smaller area dimples the plastic. And the aftermarket ones are even smaller. The new-style bolts have the greatest surface area with no washer. They work, just as they are. I wouldn't post three or four times about it if I weren't sure.
    Anton Largiader 72724
    largiader.com bmwra.org

  5. #20
    Day Dreaming ... happy wanderer's Avatar
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    One thing not mentioned so far (I think..) is the fasteners Anton is recommending are also Torx head and not Allen (hex) heads. I'm still warming up to Torx fasteners but it is true that they hang on to the tool better than Allen heads do and are also way less prone to "spreading" and the heads becoming sloppy. This is a big advantage for fairing screws. I don't know about you guys but I seem to be pulling mine off a LOT.

    I think I'll switch over to the new style once I run out of my spare Allen head fasteners and washers. Which won't be long now...
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
    '81 R80G/S, '82 R100RS, '00 R1100RT

  6. #21
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    I've learned to not to like the older hex screws. Sure as heck, if its not one of our bikes, I'll have to break out old style hand impact tools like it was an old J brand bike with JIS screws or replace a buggered one. Once you've worked on stuff built with torx you really won't want to go back.

    Torx are especially helpful when you have to break one of those hard loctited fasteners with minimal heat, especially if you don't have a good adjustable airgun handy to help. Props to BMW for dumping hex- wish more would do it.

  7. #22
    . AntonLargiader's Avatar
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    Throw a T25 L wrench 71 11 2 347 278 (five bucks) into your toolkit and a T25 driver from Sears (five more bucks) in your toolbox at home. Voila, you're in the modern age.
    Anton Largiader 72724
    largiader.com bmwra.org

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntonLargiader View Post
    Throw a T25 L wrench 71 11 2 347 278 (five bucks) into your toolkit and a T25 driver from Sears (five more bucks) in your toolbox at home. Voila, you're in the modern age.
    I bought a bag o' driver bits - 3mm Allen to go in an electric screwdriver or drill.
    Works well in a dedicated screwdriver with minimal torque, or one of the fancier drills with a clutch.
    Set for "stun" first.
    The bits are softer than the OEM steel screws though.

    My normal manual 3mm is a ball-end, which I think strips the screw more easily; less contact area.

    I repainted the black steel screws a couple of times, more to slow the rust down than for looks.
    It stays on only until the next time a wrench touches it.

    And speaking of paint; I have no trouble at all cranking the little beasties down to the point of breaking the body paint, in spite of the washers.
    Some of the panels are dark gray under the paint and some have a white (%@#$$) primer underneath.

    Personally I wouldn't miss the Allen heads at all if I were to swap out for Torx.

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