Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 46

Thread: Is there a "Weird Award" for engineers?

  1. #16
    Arte Johns son
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    Bad is still bad
    Just an engineering choice. Engineering is about compromise; assuming competence, there are no "bad" choices, just ones that align more or less with your desires. The reduction in unsprung weight (and corresponding increase in handling) more than offset the increase in labor to replace the rotors. I think anyone who has driven an E-Type would agree...

    Besides, just replace the pads often enough (mere minutes of work) and you'll never need to touch the rotors.

    Happy New year!

    John
    Last edited by Arte Johns son; 01-01-2014 at 04:01 PM. Reason: Punctuation auto-correct

  2. #17
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    "Big Bend" TX
    Posts
    8,648
    Quote Originally Posted by Arte Johns son View Post
    Just an engineering choice. Engineering is about compromise; assuming competence, there are no "bad" choices, just ones that align more or less with your desires.

    John
    If you actually believe this you have never, ever, seen some BMW motorcycle sidestand designs.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

  3. #18
    Arte Johns son
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    If you actually believe this you have never, ever, seen some BMW motorcycle sidestand designs.
    I tip my hat to you, sir...

    I have a 2002 S54 M Roadster. My friend and I often take it to conventions in SF (two-seaters get to use the carpool lanes). As we notice yet another of its many quirks, we will share a knowing look and declare "Engineered like *no* other car in the world!".

    Ah, but that glorious engine. Makes everything all right, it does.

    Cheers!

    John

  4. #19
    Left Coast Rider
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Vancouver Canada
    Posts
    1,019
    Quote Originally Posted by Arte Johns son View Post
    Inboard disc brakes were designed in an effort to reduce unsprung weight. Used on 100's of cars from Jag E-types to Olds Toronados. Nothing to do with quick assembly?
    Some Tyrrells used them on all four wheels. You can see the faired disc covers here behind the rad exits and between the front wheels.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ty..._Donington.jpg

    However, the added complication and additional parts (drive shafts and cv joints) pretty much negated the theoretical advantages. Now a moot point with lightweight calipers and discs.

  5. #20
    Small road corner junkie pffog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    WNY, Further fron NYC, than 6 entire states!
    Posts
    2,081
    Quote Originally Posted by Arte Johns son View Post
    ..............
    Besides, just replace the pads often enough (mere minutes of work) and you'll never need to touch the rotors.
    John
    Obviously you live in a temped climate, through the N and NE the tons of salt applied to the roads for ice and snow, will eat any ferrous materials, and set up electrolysis with several other materials. Only plastic is safe.

    And of course to disassemble anything under a car gets interesting when the former hex head bolt looks more like a rivet head once the rust is removed, and everything is seized. Mechanics in the N should make 2-3 times/ hr, what one in AZ makes, if being paid via flat rate.
    2010 F800GS Full Ohlins package, '04 R1100S Replika
    '01 F650GS Wife's bike
    Maritime Alps and Vosges 2012
    Tuscany and Central Italy 2010

  6. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Wilmington, NC
    Posts
    2,118
    pffog,
    Your note reminds me how spoiled I've become since moving south 25 years ago. Had just about forgotten how many totally rusted bits I had to cut off machines when I lived in upstate NY. Don't ever have that problem here in NC, forgotten where my nutcracker is, etc etc..
    My metal saws get little use here and I haven't had to replace a rotted body panel on anything either..

    But you guys sure have nicer weather in July and August...

  7. #22
    Small road corner junkie pffog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    WNY, Further fron NYC, than 6 entire states!
    Posts
    2,081
    Quote Originally Posted by racer7 View Post
    ....................
    But you guys sure have nicer weather in July and August...
    True, and pretty much free of destructive natural disasters like floods, tornadoes, hurricanes, sink holes, forest fires, earthquakes etc. When I travel and tell people I am near Buffalo, many comment it must be terrible. That Blizzards are so bad, I usually reply, yea the last one we had in 1977, I got stranded at my girlfriends (now wife) place for 3 days. Had to snuggle a lot and have a couple glasses of wine.

    Snow melts and your property is still there. Now if we could do something about the taxes.
    2010 F800GS Full Ohlins package, '04 R1100S Replika
    '01 F650GS Wife's bike
    Maritime Alps and Vosges 2012
    Tuscany and Central Italy 2010

  8. #23
    Arte Johns son
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by pffog View Post
    Obviously you live in a temped climate, through the N and NE the tons of salt applied to the roads for ice and snow, will eat any ferrous materials, and set up electrolysis with several other materials. Only plastic is safe.

    And of course to disassemble anything under a car gets interesting when the former hex head bolt looks more like a rivet head once the rust is removed, and everything is seized. Mechanics in the N should make 2-3 times/ hr, what one in AZ makes, if being paid via flat rate.
    Well, I was born in Alaska, have a home in BC as well as California. But I take your point, and would never work as a mechanic in the NE.

    I was 14, doing a tune-up on dad's '68 Bronco with leaky valve cover gaskets when I decided that working on other peoples' filthy cars was not fun. Since we're talking about doing our own work on our vehicles here, I only offer this advice: keep 'em clean. I'm not driving an E-Type Jag in the snow and salt (or a 6-wheel Tyrell F1!), that's what my $1 1993 Explorer is for. And even that gets pressure washed when I get home. It's much easier to keep them clean in the first place, and mechanical things last much longer that way.

    Cheers!

    John

  9. #24
    Left Coast Rider
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Vancouver Canada
    Posts
    1,019
    Quote Originally Posted by Arte Johns son View Post
    I'm not driving... a 6-wheel Tyrell F1!)....
    To the best of my knowledge, the P34's never had inboard brakes.

  10. #25
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    B.P., MN
    Posts
    713
    We've had a particularity cold and early winter here in central Minnesota, but the trusty Brick starts up on command and motors down the road while many others puzzle over computer commands. The colder the temps, the better I like it. Bring it on, winter that is, no problem and the sweeter is spring. Bike is up on the lift getting the usual hands on updates anticipating the international rally in St. Paul this summer. Cheers.
    Last edited by 8ninety8; 01-03-2014 at 02:13 PM.

  11. #26
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    1,642
    Quote Originally Posted by Arte Johns son View Post
    Just an engineering choice. Engineering is about compromise; assuming competence, there are no "bad" choices, just ones that align more or less with your desires.
    amc_gremlin-gt-ad.jpgAMC_Pacer_1975_French_advertisement.jpgB32603.jpg

    Let's say, we just disagree......
    Cave contents: 99 R11RS, 2013 Toyota Tacoma, 03 Simplicity Legacy, 97 Stihl FS75, Dewalt DW625 & DW744

  12. #27
    Left Coast Rider
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Vancouver Canada
    Posts
    1,019
    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    Let's say, we just disagree......
    Nice. Three home runs by AMC.

  13. #28
    Arte Johns son
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    Yes, I guess we do. While I can certainly find three vehicles from any manufacturer that don't meet my desires, that was exactly my point. And out of the three you picked, you probably couldn't do better in 1974 than a 304-powered Gremlin X (certainly as much power as Corvette of the same year, and way ahead of any Mustang/Camaro). The Pacer actually had an amazingly ingenious bit of engineering: a short driver door, since most of us drive alone and it made it easier to get in and out of the car in tight spots, and a long passenger door to make easier access for passengers to get in the back seat. What it didn't have was any sense of style.

    Not too bad for a company breathing its last. And they were still competently engineered; you just don't want one. Cool.

    Cheers!

    John (Off to go search for a Gremlin X to restomod)

  14. #29
    Arte Johns son
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by BC1100S View Post
    To the best of my knowledge, the P34's never had inboard brakes.
    Yeah, but if I'm gonna have a Tyrell, that's the one I want. And I still won't drive it in snow!



    Cheers!

    John

    Your Sunshine Coast occasional neighbor.

  15. #30
    Arte Johns son
    Guest
    Honestly, if you need an example of less than competent engineering (although it made for one of the best Top Gear episodes ever!):

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQh56geU0X8

    Cheers!

    John

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •