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Thread: Transport Canada and BMW issued a recall on multiple models

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    Still Wondering mika's Avatar
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    Transport Canada and BMW issued a recall on multiple models

    Transport Canada and BMW issued a recall on multiple vehicle models
    On certain motorcycles, cracks could develop in the fuel pump and/or auxiliary fuel pump flange (if equipped). This would result in fuel leaking when the engine is turned on and the fuel system is pressurized....
    Pass the mustard and UP THE REVOLUTION!

    St. Paul Pioneer Press , Minneapolis Star Tribune

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    And we here in the USA been trying to get this done for how many years?
    Karl
    2007 R1200ST

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    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kthutchinson View Post
    And we here in the USA been trying to get this done for how many years?
    No kidding. This has been a problem for some time now, particularly on the R1200RT.

    Let's hope this forces a redesign by BMW.

    Say, how does Transport Canada feel about Final Drives?!
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    Looks like it took them nearly 10 years to smell the fumes?
    Great timing though! Yesterday I was cleaning out some shop stuff & came across a bag with a pair of black plastic "you know whats" inside. Volia! I wonder if I lawyer up & maybe tell them what's going on "up north", I can cash in? I spent some serious money for metal "you know whats"! And then , of course, all those hours(billable hours for civilians) of research reading about o-ring materials & fuel line materials,ad infintum, etc.,etc.!
    If I'd only saved that old FD seal for evidence that's long gone...
    "If I had my life to live over, I'd dare to make more mistakes next time...I'd relax,I'd limber up... I would take fewer things seriously...take more chances... take more trips...climb more mountains...swim more rivers...eat more ice cream." Jorge Luis Borges at age 85.

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    Here's a question for our Canadian members. Does Transport Canada make documents related to recalls available on-line? NHTSA makes available letters between NHTSA and the manufacturer, service bulletins, copies of the actual recall letter to owners, and other documents for every recall. I couldn't find anything similar on the Transport Canada web site. It would be nice to see the paper trail on this one.
    Karl
    2007 R1200ST

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    Still Wondering mika's Avatar
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    Motorcyclists remain the weakest and failing part in the monitoring and recall systems of the United States and Canada by their gross under-reporting of problems to the system. File a complaint with NHTSA or Transport Canada; they are not just for cages.

    Yes you can lawyer up when you have a problem. One of the first things you will be paying attorneys fees for will be a search of government data bases for related complaints, investigations and recalls to support your case. Under reporting to the agencies does not help get problems taken care of by the agencies or plaintiffs recover damages.

    Yes I do see merit in associations having liaisons or advocates as part of their member benefits. Their leverage is limited. Like attorneys, they will be most effective if they can leverage reports to the monitoring agencies. Our under reporting undermines that process.

    I will quickly agree with anyone who expresses frustration with the speed or these agencies response to complaints and the sense that motorcyclists seem to be second class citizens for the agencies focus. However, how much of that is the result of our relegating ourselves to second class status by under-reporting?

    We already pay taxes for these agencies. Put them to work for motorcyclists. When you have issues file a report.
    Pass the mustard and UP THE REVOLUTION!

    St. Paul Pioneer Press , Minneapolis Star Tribune

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    Registered User dieselyoda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kthutchinson View Post
    Here's a question for our Canadian members. Does Transport Canada make documents related to recalls available on-line? NHTSA makes available letters between NHTSA and the manufacturer, service bulletins, copies of the actual recall letter to owners, and other documents for every recall. I couldn't find anything similar on the Transport Canada web site. It would be nice to see the paper trail on this one.
    http://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Saf-Sec-Sur/....aspx?lang=eng
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    I've been there. The only information available is the recall announcement, the same announcement as in the original post.
    Karl
    2007 R1200ST

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    As said before by someone, considering the actual mileage motorcycles put down the road, in aggregate, considering the lack of discussion concerning the need of the complexity of today's motorcycles, FI, cat. Converters, water cooling, multiple on board computers, switches for whatever, brakes, suspension, riding mode, engine management modes, and on and on. Progress? Complexity? Recalls?

    It would seem to make sense to just build bikes with the simplest systems practical to what a rider needs to git on down the road commensurate with the total possible environmental aggregate effect the few of these bikes could have. These systems could then undergo decades of development thus practically eliminating failures as mentioned. Ya wonder where it's all gonna go, or end. Maybe computer controlled robots driving bikes with MOA members sitting in an approved sidecar.

    An acquaintance,this summer, unfortunately riding a bike with an on off switch for "riding mode" regular, sport, whatever, while taking a corner inadvertently hit the sport mode and plowed into a parked cage. But we're all safer and better motorcyclists having such a system wired into the controls. And the more complex bikes become, the more recalls will be in the works. More complexity doesn't conform to better biking, less recalls. This is a reflection on where I think motorcycling and motorcycle development headed in the last few decades, and the actual need for certain types of technical development, its cost, and its return and the resultant recalls.

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    Registered User dieselyoda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kthutchinson View Post
    I've been there. The only information available is the recall announcement, the same announcement as in the original post.
    I didn't get a chance to follow through. If you follow that link and and the ones on the sidebar, you can find some history, including any actual instances of damage/injury. It's cumbersome.
    1997 R1100RT (Restored Basket Case) , 1981 KZ 440 LTD (Restored Basket Case)
    1986 K75S(the beutch), 1993 K1100RS (blown engine), 1997 Chev Short Box (4x4 with an LT1)
    "You can easily judge the character of a man by how he treats those who can do nothing for him."

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    Still Wondering mika's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kthutchinson View Post
    I've been there. The only information available is the recall announcement, the same announcement as in the original post.
    http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/contact-us.htm#general

    This may be the place to start looking for the supporting documentation. Contact Transport Canada and ask for the information you desire and or how to apply for access to it.
    Pass the mustard and UP THE REVOLUTION!

    St. Paul Pioneer Press , Minneapolis Star Tribune

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    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8ninety8 View Post
    As said before by someone, considering the actual mileage motorcycles put down the road, in aggregate, considering the lack of discussion concerning the need of the complexity of today's motorcycles, FI, cat. Converters, water cooling, multiple on board computers, switches for whatever, brakes, suspension, riding mode, engine management modes, and on and on. Progress? Complexity? Recalls?

    It would seem to make sense to just build bikes with the simplest systems practical to what a rider needs to git on down the road commensurate with the total possible environmental aggregate effect the few of these bikes could have. These systems could then undergo decades of development thus practically eliminating failures as mentioned. Ya wonder where it's all gonna go, or end. Maybe computer controlled robots driving bikes with MOA members sitting in an approved sidecar.

    An acquaintance,this summer, unfortunately riding a bike with an on off switch for "riding mode" regular, sport, whatever, while taking a corner inadvertently hit the sport mode and plowed into a parked cage. But we're all safer and better motorcyclists having such a system wired into the controls. And the more complex bikes become, the more recalls will be in the works. More complexity doesn't conform to better biking, less recalls. This is a reflection on where I think motorcycling and motorcycle development headed in the last few decades, and the actual need for certain types of technical development, its cost, and its return and the resultant recalls.
    Excellent point. Just because you can build a more complex motorcycle doesn't necessarily mean you should.

    That's a lesson that BMW will likely never learn, as they have swapped reliability for technological complexity.

    We thought we 'needed' single-sided swing arms to the rear wheel - to save weight, they told us. Instead, the torque of that fad now eats final drives (crown bearings, seals .... whatever) for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Engineering logic supports (no pun intended) that a drive wheel be braced equally on both sides. Ah, but what of progress......!

    Different drive modes to choose from (though most riders can't even tell the difference) - that used to be more easily accomplished by the rider himself/herself making adjustments to clutch/throttle/brakes to fine-tune the performance of the bike in different scenarios. Ah, but what of progress............!

    Fuel strips instead of floats, rear shocks that have a replacement cost in the thousands, headlamps that are incredibly difficult to service, an 'electrical nervous system' (canBus) costing more than 4 sets of tires from my Sonata to entirely replace (beware of mice!) ............... the list goes on and on. Ah .............. progress.
    Kevin Greenwald - Touring Tips Editor
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    Registered User David13's Avatar
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    All this recall says, which applies up north, not here, is that BMW will install a reinforcing ring.
    Most of us already done that. And replaced the plastic qds also. So big deal. There's more to it than they admit in this Canada only thing.
    As usual, I'm better off on my own.
    dc

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    . AntonLargiader's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greenwald View Post
    Engineering logic supports (no pun intended) that a drive wheel be braced equally on both sides.
    I sure don't see many cars built that way. Your statement has no basis at all.
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    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntonLargiader View Post
    I sure don't see many cars built that way. Your statement has no basis at all.
    Cars don't have a single drive wheel in the rear - I thought that might have been obvious, given we were discussing motorcycles.
    Kevin Greenwald - Touring Tips Editor
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