Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19

Thread: gasoline with 10% ethanol in my 1992 K75 OK?

  1. #1
    keither
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    San Antonio TX
    Posts
    12

    gasoline with 10% ethanol in my 1992 K75 OK?

    I've just acquired a sweet little K75 with only 31000 miles and in excellent shape. It runs great and no porblems. I noticed in the shop manual that gas with ethanol is not recommended; do we have a choice? What additives can we use to keep the ethanol from damaging th fuel system? Maybe upgrades have been made available?
    K75, Christmas cactus bloom, 027.JPG

  2. #2
    3 Red Bricks
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pleasanton, Ca.
    Posts
    3,393
    SWEET!

    You really don't have much choice any more. Not really a problem unless you let the bike sit long enough for the fuel to breakdown. If the fuel separates, it will attack and dissolve the rubber vibration damper that holds the fuel pump inside the gas tank. The gunk will get sucked into the pump and injectors and kill them. You should have no problem if you regularly ride it (something the previous owners might not have done with that low mileage).



    LONG MAY YOUR BRICK FLY!

    Ride Safe, Ride Far, Ride Often

    Lee Fulton Forum Moderator
    3 Marakesh Red K75Ss
    Mine, Hers, Spare

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    San Ramon, CA
    Posts
    32
    Put some Stabil Marine fuel stabilizer in the tank. It has a fuel dryer that helps keep the ethanol in the gas from absorbing water.

    David Sword

  4. #4
    Registered User WalterK75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Mississauga, Ontario
    Posts
    558
    Use Stabil if storing the bike, otherwise ride it a lot. Check around there are a few places where ethanol free gasoline is available. You can look here for help: http://pure-gas.org/
    PS: nice looking bike. Love the colour.
    Walter

    All government, of course, is against liberty.
    H. L. Mencken

  5. #5
    keither
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    San Antonio TX
    Posts
    12

    ethanol gas

    Quote Originally Posted by 98lee View Post
    SWEET!

    You really don't have much choice any more. Not really a problem unless you let the bike sit long enough for the fuel to breakdown. If the fuel separates, it will attack and dissolve the rubber vibration damper that holds the fuel pump inside the gas tank. The gunk will get sucked into the pump and injectors and kill them. You should have no problem if you regularly ride it (something the previous owners might not have done with that low mileage).



    Thanks for the info, dont worry, I'll ride a lot

  6. #6
    keither
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    San Antonio TX
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by dsword View Post
    Put some Stabil Marine fuel stabilizer in the tank. It has a fuel dryer that helps keep the ethanol in the gas from absorbing water.

    David Sword
    Thanks! I already have some Stabil Marine for the boat, now I feel better.

  7. #7
    keither
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    San Antonio TX
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by WalterK75 View Post
    Use Stabil if storing the bike, otherwise ride it a lot. Check around there are a few places where ethanol free gasoline is available. You can look here for help: http://pure-gas.org/
    PS: nice looking bike. Love the colour.
    Thanks for the advice. I'll ride a lot anyway this is the riding season in South Texas

  8. #8
    Slipster Slipster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Broken Arrow, OK
    Posts
    83
    Expect The Unexpected

  9. #9
    Registered User kgadley01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    3,533
    Seafoam also works well. A couple of ounces every three tanks works for me.
    AKA SNAPGADGET
    Lifes too short to ride an ugly Motorcycle

  10. #10
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Spring Lake NJ, USA
    Posts
    7,735
    As far as additives, our friendly local BMW store's parts department ran in interesting experiment. They mixed gasoline with the recommended percentage of each fuel additive they could find. Each mix got put in a glass jar, with about 1/4" of air at the top, and a nail was dumped in, then the jars were sealed with tape around the cap edge.

    They wanted to see if any of the additives prevented rust with the idea that rust would only occur if separation of the gasoline and ethanol occurred. Only one stood out for a good reason. One other stood out for a bad reason.

    Stabil wasn't awful, but some rust did start on the nail. SeaFoam was a clear looser - the nail was covered with rust and the mixture had rust flakes in it. They had one jar with just gasoline in it - it was clearer than the jar with the SeaFoam/gasoline mix. The one that seemed to prevent rust entirely was called "K100-MG" (www.k-100.com - I looked on the bottle in my garage.) I forget what the other additives were - but they were commonly available ones. The dealership stocks both the K-100 and the Stabil, but their suggestion to me was to use the K100.

    Was this an unbiased test? Probably - the parts guy was pretty proud that they'd come up with it. Was it scientific - probably not as rigidly as I would like, but it did show some results, and the bad results were quite impressive, even more-so than the good results.

    Will it help with the separation that damages the rubber components in the K bikes? Dunno - be interesting if someone has some to mix up with some gasoline and dump a bit of the in-tank fuel line into for a while, to see what happens to it (along with another bit in untreated gasoline for a comparison.)

    It went in my tank when I wasn't able to ride for 7 weeks (slightly broken leg), and it's in my snow-blower and generator tanks. Can't say if it's doing anything good or bad since I have no A vs B comparison setup, but I'm hoping it's helping to preserve the gasoline in those tanks. I'm back to riding the bike enough that it isn't a worry right now..
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders New Sweden BMW Riders
    '07 R1200R (current ride) and some bimmers.. and a Porsche

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    San Ramon, CA
    Posts
    32
    Don,
    Do you know if the Stabil used in the test was the regular red stuff, or the dark Marine Stabil? The Marine version is the only one with a drying agent and is made to help with ethanol problems in marine engines. The pink stuff is just for fuel longevity.

    David Sword

    Quote Originally Posted by deilenberger View Post
    As far as additives, our friendly local BMW store's parts department ran in interesting experiment. They mixed gasoline with the recommended percentage of each fuel additive they could find. Each mix got put in a glass jar, with about 1/4" of air at the top, and a nail was dumped in, then the jars were sealed with tape around the cap edge.

    They wanted to see if any of the additives prevented rust with the idea that rust would only occur if separation of the gasoline and ethanol occurred. Only one stood out for a good reason. One other stood out for a bad reason.

    Stabil wasn't awful, but some rust did start on the nail. SeaFoam was a clear looser - the nail was covered with rust and the mixture had rust flakes in it. They had one jar with just gasoline in it - it was clearer than the jar with the SeaFoam/gasoline mix. The one that seemed to prevent rust entirely was called "K100-MG" (www.k-100.com - I looked on the bottle in my garage.) I forget what the other additives were - but they were commonly available ones. The dealership stocks both the K-100 and the Stabil, but their suggestion to me was to use the K100.

    Was this an unbiased test? Probably - the parts guy was pretty proud that they'd come up with it. Was it scientific - probably not as rigidly as I would like, but it did show some results, and the bad results were quite impressive, even more-so than the good results.

    Will it help with the separation that damages the rubber components in the K bikes? Dunno - be interesting if someone has some to mix up with some gasoline and dump a bit of the in-tank fuel line into for a while, to see what happens to it (along with another bit in untreated gasoline for a comparison.)

    It went in my tank when I wasn't able to ride for 7 weeks (slightly broken leg), and it's in my snow-blower and generator tanks. Can't say if it's doing anything good or bad since I have no A vs B comparison setup, but I'm hoping it's helping to preserve the gasoline in those tanks. I'm back to riding the bike enough that it isn't a worry right now..

  12. #12
    Minnesota Nice! braddog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Twin Cities - MN
    Posts
    1,924
    I have also heard that ethanol doesn't separate like it used to when they first started using it in gasoline. Back in the 80's, I had a car that could NOT use gas with ethanol in it or else the rubber parts on the accelerator pump inside the carburetor would break down. I rebuilt that carburetor twice before reading an article in the local paper about what ethanol in gas could potentially do. I searched out stations that sold gas without ethanol, and the problem was solved.

    Here in Minnesota, I burn ethanol gasoline in my airhead and oilhead all the time. The biggest downfall I've ever experienced is that my gas mileage is down a bit from using gas without ethanol. The bikes seem to run just fine, though, and I've not had any rubber bits break down.

    Living in Texas, just ride that motorcycle and I would think you'll be fine.
    -----------------------------------------
    Brad D. - Member #105766
    '77 R100RS - Black Beauty (big pipe, baby!)
    '94 R1100RS - Sylvia

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Joplin, MO
    Posts
    962
    When I am on the road and switch from pure gas to ethanol or back, as I ride off I feel a slight stumble, then some softness in throttle that goes away when the o2 kicks in, which is easy to feel from the slight surge that comes back.

    Nothing dangerous, just can feel it.

    Rod

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Joplin, MO
    Posts
    962
    When I am on the road and switch from pure gas to ethanol or back, as I ride off I feel a slight stumble, then some softness in throttle that goes away when the o2 kicks in, which is easy to feel from the slight surge that comes back.

    Nothing dangerous, just can feel it.

    Rod

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Topeka, KS
    Posts
    119
    Here's the link to the MSDS for K100.

    http://www.fuel-testers.com/MSDS_K10...Treatment.html

    Draw your own conclusions about putting anti-freeze in your gasoline.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •