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Thread: Regardless of price which is better: Heated gloves or heated grips?

  1. #16
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    If you have no other electric clothing I would start with electric jacket liner
    type with heated collar forearms and kidney area
    Surprising how warm the rest of you feels if the kidney area is heated - all your blood gets warmed
    So given the limited output of the /6 I would put the first available watts into a jacket liner

    Wear mittens loose enough that you can easily move your fingers about in them and get them on and off
    easily by trapping between knee and tank to quickly wipe glasses or such bare handed tasks underway

    If there is available electricity after the jacket liner (aftermarket alternator etc.) then next would be heated grips
    in addition to the mittens

    Learn not to actually squeeze grip the grips unless necessary - just rest palms on grips for most of ride
    this will keep hands warmer inside mittens wiggling fingers etc.

    Heated gloves add a complexity and lack of easy removal and reattach underway that I am not willing to live with.
    Tried them and hated them compared to good synthetic mittens with modern insulation and thin leather palms

  2. #17
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwyandell View Post
    You'll always have your heated grips with you . . . .
    That's the great thing about heated grips. I've never taken a trip and forgot to take my grips
    Lee 2011 K1300S
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  3. #18
    TravelsWithBarley.com
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    Cold means different things to different people, and without knowing where you are or how your ride (profile would help) I'm not sure what your baseline is.

    I ride year round in Vermont at temps down to 10F - gotta draw the line somewhere - but I also take precautions like dressing in layers and always taking the same route below freezing so I know where every culvert, wet spot, etc is located. I find bulky gloves awkward, and find plugging in a pain. My solution was to wear my Held Steve II gloves year round, and installing my Hippo Hands at temps below 35F. I find that the heated grips are much more effective when wind is eliminated from the equation.

    But if my ride is longer than 75 miles at temps below 20F, definitely Gerbings.
    '07 R1200GS for solo rides
    '10 R1200GSA with Hannigan dual sport sidecar for rides with Barley

  4. #19
    Larry xlarry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by racer7 View Post
    Handguards are the most important thing for cold weather riding. Can be Barbusters (shield) type or enclosure type (lie Hippo Hands). The latter are extremely effective but a bit of an acquired taste.
    Anybody used the Hippo hands or something similar on an RT? I think they might interfere with seeing out the mirrors?
    Larry
    Midnight Blue 2013 BMW R1200RT (purchased 9/24/2013)
    2010 Harley Road Glide (gone after 61,964 miles)
    2001 Harley Electra Glide (gone after 138,048 miles)

  5. #20
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    The latter are extremely effective but a bit of an acquired taste.
    An acquired taste indeed. When Vetter originally came out with HippoHands back in the late 70's I almost would not use them based on the aesthetics alone. But as an R&D employee I was expected to ride all year long and finally installed a set. I was hooked after that, and not anywhere near as cumbersome as they look. But I always rode them with a Windjammer on the bike, so I can't comment on how they would work with a naked bike; the aerodynamics might be totally different.



    The "new" HippoHands company posts the following warning on their R100RT page.

    PLEASE NOTE: In the pursuit of full transparency, we need to point out to our customers BEFORE they order, that if no significant wind protection exists on the bike, blowback of the muffs against the levers is a possibility, causing possible damage to brake or clutch components if it persists. If this is the case, you should install metal brackets or small inexpensive brush guards, in order to prevent this from happening. These are available in stores or Internet for around $30-40.
    What it sounds like they are describing is the levers being "compressed" by the air pressure against them resulting in the brakes being lightly applied and/or the clutch being inadvertently "feathered". With the RT clearance might be a problem when going lock-to-lock (as in turning around in the driveway, etc.) - certainly something worth a call to their sales office (?)

    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  6. #21
    #4869 DennisDarrow's Avatar
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    I used a pair of the very early ones on a /5 with an AVON. Then on a /6 with a different Avon.........Then on an R80 RT with the newer style as shown in the pic.......NO PROBLEMS other than folks looking at you a lot to try to figure it out........VERY worthwhile to have. No problems with levers or lock to lock turning. Yes, one get's used to threading your hands into that opening even in a hurry.
    They covered my year round riding style in OKC for many years while I went to school and then became the teacher that parks his bike down there by the woodshop..........God bless.......Dennis

  7. #22
    Registered User richardak's Avatar
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    I use a pair of the foam covers kind of like what's shown in the photo above made for an ATV on my RT. No interference issues at all. And have heated grips and heated gloves. The grips only get used when it's really cold as in below -10F. Then with all three, grips, Gerbing gloves and the covers, my hands are toasty warm. My low temperature cut off is -20F as the heated liner has difficulty keeping me warm.

    I like the comment about always having the grip heaters with you and they are better than nothing but I find the gloves much warmer.
    1983 R100RT hacked w/Cozy Rocket My blog
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  8. #23
    What's that noise...? basketcase's Avatar
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    For the record, unless I am heading someplace warmer I no longer leave home on the bike when the temps are below 45* Fahrenheit. Been there, done that -- including an epic CDT trip several years back where we dealt with cold rain, sleet, and ice and snow. And all that on buck nekkid, unfaired Suzuki DR650's.

    So I've earned my right to sit a home when it's wet and cold and let younger knuckleheads entertain delusions of having fun in that mess...

    But I do have an opinion.

    With a view to function and versatility (think heat-troller to perfectly control the temps) I vote for gloves.

    Sweating under one's clothing in frigid temps is a prescription for disaster, and my experience with heated grips on three K bikes was that it was either too warm (think sweaty palms) or nothing at all. The same was true for my BMW heated vest when it was simply on/off. It was either too warm, or nothing at all.

    With gloves and a heat-troller one can layer up and minimize the need to draw on electric power. The same applies to the various heated garments available on the market.

    Finally, if the power supply fails and the rider is stranded -- having planned around the electrical support for warmth, life can quickly turn cold and miserable.

    And there is still the matter of electrical system output and other mechanical gremlins.

    Remember, as long as you are standing next to the bike you look normal, but when suited up the further you get from the bike the more you look like an escapee from some kind of asylum. That said, I'll stick with my gloves and other bulky alien looking stuff.
    '98 BMW Z3 Roadster, '00 R1100RT

    If you insist on exercising a right to burn our flag, first be so kind as to wrap yourself in it and then douse yourself with gasoline just before you strike the match.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by basketcase View Post
    For the record, unless I am heading someplace warmer I no longer leave home on the bike when the temps are below 45* Fahrenheit. Been there, done that -- including an epic CDT trip several years back where we dealt with cold rain, sleet, and ice and snow. And all that on buck nekkid, unfaired Suzuki DR650's.

    So I've earned my right to sit a home when it's wet and cold and let younger knuckleheads entertain delusions of having fun in that mess...

    But I do have an opinion.

    With a view to function and versatility (think heat-troller to perfectly control the temps) I vote for gloves.

    Sweating under one's clothing in frigid temps is a prescription for disaster, and my experience with heated grips on three K bikes was that it was either too warm (think sweaty palms) or nothing at all. The same was true for my BMW heated vest when it was simply on/off. It was either too warm, or nothing at all.

    With gloves and a heat-troller one can layer up and minimize the need to draw on electric power. The same applies to the various heated garments available on the market.

    Finally, if the power supply fails and the rider is stranded -- having planned around the electrical support for warmth, life can quickly turn cold and miserable.

    And there is still the matter of electrical system output and other mechanical gremlins.

    Remember, as long as you are standing next to the bike you look normal, but when suited up the further you get from the bike the more you look like an escapee from some kind of asylum. That said, I'll stick with my gloves and other bulky alien looking stuff.
    My sentiments exactly. Years ago, when I was one of those "younger" guys, I used snowmobile clothing and layers. I was perfectly OK - though, I admit, I never took any sort of extended trips like many of you did/do, so my method of keeping warm may not be workable.

  10. #25
    Registered User ezwicky's Avatar
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    my experiences with choosing and using heated gloves on a naked airhead

    i ride a naked R90/6. i recently upgraded to enduralast charging system so i could power heated gear. i didn't want to be on the ragged edge of charging, since i was planning to get a heated jacket liner and gloves, and then possibly a heated pants liner and socks later.

    i don't have heated grips, so i will just give you my experiences and thoughts on the gloves.

    a few weeks ago, i tried on a couple pair of gerbing heated gloves and went for the T-5 because they had a bit more padding than the gerbing G-3, but still they are not real "motorcycle" gloves. there's no armor, just padding. they are indeed bulky, but for me the alternative would have been heated liners underneath a good armored glove. but that glove would have needed to be over-sized to accommodate the liners, rendering them too big for the other times of the year. so i just couldn't see it.

    but if i were to do it again, i would have seriously considered the warm-n-safe ultimate touring gloves. they do have armor, and they also have a good reputation. i might even go ahead and buy a pair, compare to the gerbings, and then send the loser to ebay.

    i have gone for several 2-hour rides in the low 30s and the gloves have kept my hand from feeling cold. how warm they feel depends on how fast i am going (how much wind is hitting the gloves). at 80mph on a 4-lane, with the glove controller on full, my hands were comfortable. not warm, mind you, just not cold. which is A-OK.

    at lower speeds and sitting at a stop-light, they do feel warm. just for fun i turned the gloves off on a smaller back road going about 35, and my hands got chilled in about a half a minute. i turned them back on and i was good. i have read several forum posts that allude to this same phenomenon of heated gloves not really being warm, but rather keeping your hands from feeling cold, so apparently it's not just me.

    bear in mind that i also have a heated jacket liner, two layers of merino-wool and an olympia AST jacket, so my torso and arms are warm, which probably reduces the need for my hands to be really warm feeling.

    i will admit that the glove wiring is bulky and hard to stuff into the gloves at first, but i got used to it quickly and the trade-off of getting into all the gear is really worth it when i can ride around on a nice sunny day and not be cold.

    one thing i would advise: get a *dual* , *wireless* heat-troller. you will probably decide to get a jacket liner at some point and will need a dual controller. and wireless because you can mount it somewhere easily-reachable and not have wires dangling all over your tank. i zip-tied mine to the top of the turn-signal control unit on my airhead. one good long zip-tie and i can cut it off when spring arrives and put it away til the next winter. the receiver until stashes away in the liner pocket and the only wire i have dangling anywhere is the one connecting to my battery pigtail.

    good luck. i hope this information will help you make a decision.

    -eric
    BMWMOA #182796

    '76 R90/6

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