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Thread: EFI MODs

  1. #1
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    EFI MODs

    I am reading the December 2013 Motorcycle Consumer News and saw the article on EFI Mods. It talks about Booster Plug www.boosterplug.com and Accelerator Module by Solid Soultions www.sol2.be. Has anyone used either of them? They sound interesting.

    They are suppose to smooth out the lean fuel mixture issues and reportedly increase mileage.

    I ride a 2013 R1200RT Anniversary Edition

  2. #2
    Lost again Texpaul's Avatar
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    I have Booster plugs installed on both my ?05 1200GS and a ?10 F650Twin. In both cases it cleaned up the low end and, to some extent, the midrange. Saw a small improvement in gas mileage on the big GS, not discernible on the 650 twin. Throttle response is improved, especially off idle. On the 650 twin I was able to go back to the stock counter sprocket (had mounted one tooth smaller to improve low speed drivability), it improved the low end that much. It did not completely eliminate the surge on the big GS, but it?s better. Only drawback is the effects drop as the temp rises so once it gets above the 80?s you don?t notice the mid range improvements that much.
    But, the off idle, low speed, drivability improvements were worth the cost.
    Installation was less than 15 minutes total on each. I mounted the temp probe on the end of the air intake tube in both cases. Improvement was immediate.
    Paul Mulhern
    MOA# 56330
    '05 1200GS Big Blue

  3. #3
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    A few thoughts on the Booster Plug, and Accelerator Module..

    The effect of both is to richen the mixture by fooling the intake air temperature sensor when the engine is "out of loop" (ie - not controlled by the O2 sensor feedback to the ECM.)

    You can experience much the same effect by simply starting and riding your bike in mid 40's temperatures. Mine feels particularly nice under acceleration at temps under 50F.

    My question to both manufacturers would be - how is the device taken out of circuit when the actual air temperature IS low - such as the 40F temps I was riding in. I don't think we want the ECU to think it's 20F out when it actually isn't. While the engine controller does rather quickly on the R12 bikes switch back to closed loop mode - it would seem you'd experience a loss of fuel mileage and an excessively rich mixture at lower temperatures if the actual intake temperature isn't taken into account.

    It's possible the thermistor in the booster plug (the temperature probe) DOES do this compensation. Dunno. Anyone know?

    Sans temperature compensation - all you're doing is adding an in-line resistance to the NTC sensor circuit to the ECU telling it that the sensor is seeing colder temperatures. A clever person could do this themselves for about $1 for a resistor and some splicing components.

    One thing the MCN article completely ignored when declaring them "equal" in performance is the effect that different temperatures might have on the two devices. That makes me question the article in it's entirety. It would be a valuable article if it had results under different temperatures, perhaps accompanied by dyno plots combined with mixture plots (something many DynoJet dyno's are capable of doing.) As it is now - it seems anecdotal to me, not really a factual article.
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders New Sweden BMW Riders
    '07 R1200R (current ride) and some bimmers.. and a Porsche

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    Lost again Texpaul's Avatar
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    Temp compensate

    My question to both manufacturers would be - how is the device taken out of circuit when the actual air temperature IS low - such as the 40F temps I was riding in. I don't think we want the ECU to think it's 20F out when it actually isn't. While the engine controller does rather quickly on the R12 bikes switch back to closed loop mode - it would seem you'd experience a loss of fuel mileage and an excessively rich mixture at lower temperatures if the actual intake temperature isn't taken into account.

    It's possible the thermistor in the booster plug (the temperature probe) DOES do this compensation. Dunno. Anyone know?
    The Booster Plug site explains how they calculate the temperature compensation here http://www.boosterplug.com/shop/cms-24.html .

    In a (non technical) nutshell the BP does not just always tell the computer it's 20 degrees cooler. If it did you are correct, it would run too rich at cooler temps. It adjusts the temp signal it sends to the ECU based on the outside temp.
    Paul Mulhern
    MOA# 56330
    '05 1200GS Big Blue

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    Registered User chewbacca's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texpaul View Post
    The Booster Plug site explains how they calculate the temperature compensation here http://www.boosterplug.com/shop/cms-24.html .

    In a (non technical) nutshell the BP does not just always tell the computer it's 20 degrees cooler. If it did you are correct, it would run too rich at cooler temps. It adjusts the temp signal it sends to the ECU based on the outside temp.
    My exposure with Booster Plug was part of the test group on Triumph Tiger modules. There is the negative slope thermistor that measures the temp in the air box which replaces the stock IAT sensor. There is another sensor that is put somewhere in the air stream. That one provides an ambient air temp reference source. That is the answer on what does it do when it is cold. Jens who makes the Booster Plug chooses the right thermistor for the range of operation. He is really sharp and does a lot of testing.

    My experience was it didn't work that well for me.
    Old But Not Dead
    Semper Fi

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    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    Paul - it appears Booster Plug's Jens did a good job with the design... and it does compensate for temperature. The other device? To me it sounds as if it might help at an ideal 20C (69F or so) - but warmer or colder - it's going to detract from the performance. Too bad MCN didn't recognize that.
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders New Sweden BMW Riders
    '07 R1200R (current ride) and some bimmers.. and a Porsche

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    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    Last year I made a very long study of fueling on BMW motorcycles, first my R1150; and then a friend's R1200 GSA Camhead near the 2/3 point in the thread. Here: http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/showthre...and-O2-Sensors

    I can say with certainty because I've recorded it with my GS-911 that the effect of the BoosterPlug is such that the Motronic and BMSK always see a -20C temperature shift. I can also report that the BMSK is a very agile ECU and it is able to negate the effect of the 20C "error" the longer you ride.

    You can however install dual LC-2s (or LC-1s if you can still find them) or the AF-XIED for BMW and the BMSK will add a programmable amount of fuel that the BMSK will not negate. Either of these approaches leave they full functioning of the BMSK intact. I know of a few dozen BMSK bikes (r1200 and f800) that have installed these, including the owner or BoosterPlug (who runs his device and an LC-1 that I helped him install) and Mike at the Beemerboneyard who has it on a couple bikes now including his R1200R.

    The AF-XIED for BMW was introduced this past summer, is made by Nightrider (produced a Harley version for a several years) and also sold at the Beemerboneyard.
    RB
    Last edited by roger 04 rt; 11-27-2013 at 12:36 PM.

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    Lost again Texpaul's Avatar
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    I can say with certainty because I've recorded it with my GS-911 that the effect of the BoosterPlug is such that the Motronic and BMSK always see a -20C temperature shift. I can also report that the BMSK is a very agile ECU and it is able to negate the effect of the 20C "error" the longer you ride.
    Could you clarify what you mean by "the longer you ride"? Do you mean at one sitting or over an extended period of time?
    Paul Mulhern
    MOA# 56330
    '05 1200GS Big Blue

  9. #9
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texpaul View Post
    Could you clarify what you mean by "the longer you ride"? Do you mean at one sitting or over an extended period of time?
    A guy I know well in Georgia runs a 2010 R1200GSA. After I completed the LC-1 installation on my R1150RT, I persuaded him to add dual LC-1s. He also has a GS-911 and sent me about 50 hours or riding data.

    The BMSK has something called Lambda Correction Factors (LCFs). They change very quickly and can be thought of as short term trims. The longer term trims move more slowly and depend on your riding style. As you ride steadily in various gears and RPMs, the BMSK uses the LCFs to create longer term trims so that the short term trims are smaller. These longer term trims get used more globally and outside the cruising range. The long term trims get created and modified slowly over minutes, hours and days. Mike F. of Beemerboneyard took a long tour with his R1200R this summer after adding AF-XIEDs and stayed in contact with me while he toured. He felt improvemts up to 1500 miles on his modified bike--longer than I expected.

    So the longer term corrections occur in one sitting and over an extended period.
    RB

  10. #10
    Lost again Texpaul's Avatar
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    Roger,

    Please correct me if I am getting this wrong. You are saying that eventually the BMSK self corrects for any attempt a unit such at the BP makes to modify the mixture.
    Paul Mulhern
    MOA# 56330
    '05 1200GS Big Blue

  11. #11
    On the Road MIKEFIGIELSKI's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texpaul View Post
    Roger,

    Please correct me if I am getting this wrong. You are saying that eventually the BMSK self corrects for any attempt a unit such at the BP makes to modify the mixture.
    Hi Paul,
    I'm sure Roger will respond in more detail than I can but my layman's understanding is that the O2 sensor signal is the final arbiter of the air fuel mixture and the BMSK will use data from the O2 signal to "adapt" out any attempt to change air/fuel ratio by fooling the air temp sensor. The AF-XiED uses a micro processor to create and provide the BMSK with the correct O2 sensor signal to insure the chosen AF ratio is maintained based on the setting you choose on the unit. All other functions of the BMSK are unaltered and the result is a 4-8% richer mixture based on your chosen setting. This is eventually carried over to closed loop fueling as well through the process Roger has described above. Hope this helps a little.
    Mike

  12. #12
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texpaul View Post
    Roger,

    Please correct me if I am getting this wrong. You are saying that eventually the BMSK self corrects for any attempt a unit such at the BP makes to modify the mixture.
    That's exactly what is happening, and that's what you can the designers would want. Here's a partial list of things that might not be precisely in spec: fuel composition +/- ethanol, fuel pressure, fuel injector flow rate, air filter cleanliness, carbon build up on the valves, pistion or CH, TPS reading, air temp reading, oil temp reading, battery voltage reading, injector dead-time vs battery voltage, on-board barometor, actual air humidity, etc. All those things can change, be inaccurate or have aged.

    As a result of those possible variances, and give the high accuracy of the stock O2 sensor (by far the most accurate) and the position it has of measuring the actual result of combustion, the BMSK and Motronic both keep internal records of how much fuel was actually needed to hit an AFR of 14.7:1. Then it analyzes that deviations and comes up with correction factors that Bosch calls Adaptation Values--invented in the late 1970s.

    As for any sensor, if it gives a signal that leads to more or less fuel than ideal, the BMSK learns that and saves up those records which it uses as corrections.

    The Boosterplug is a well made product by a guy who knows what he's doing. It's pretty accurate too. It has an interesting application together with an AF-XIED or LC-1 (Jens at BoosterPlug runs both BP and LC-1). In tandem, the BP says the air is colder use more fuel and the AF-XIED when set rich says to the BMSK, that's the right amount--so it speeds the Adaptation Process. But if you give it time, the AF-XIED or LC-1 will do the job on its own.

    The BMSK is so clever that if you disconnect one O2 sensor, it will use the estimates from the connected cylinder and apply them to the other side. I have the data, watching the mixture and seeing it happen. If you disconnect both, it still tries to keep the Cat working by varying the fueling on its own but that leads to a messy, wide fueling spread, which is why the PC V isn't a great pair with the BMSK. The PC V instructions say to get rid of both O2s and the BMSK says, okay then deal with this fueling spread. Not a good combo.
    RB

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    Hi Roger, I've read all the threads on the AF-XIED and plan to buy one early next year for my '12 R1200 GSA. I have one question that I have not seen answered. How does the AF-XIED work at high altitudes? I noticed last year while riding Independence Pass (12000') my GSA would flood easily on cold start and would like to know how the AF-XIED would handle this given the bike is already running 4-8% richer than stock. My guess is that the BMSK would eventually reduce the AFR due to the altitude. But, would that be quick enough prevent starting problems at altitude. BTW, I live on the SC coast and normally ride at sea level. Thanks for all your time on this product.

    Dave

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    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    Hey Dave, my guess is that you know that your GSA's BMSK has a barometric pressure sensor built in. The idea is that the amount of oxygen in the cylinder is less as you increase in altitude, or on a stormy day while a low pressure system is around. It's part of a group of sensors--IAT, TPS, RPM and Barometric Preasure--that allow the BMSK to estimate the amount of oxygen In the cylinder and then make a reasonably good estimate of the amount of fuel that will be required.

    No sensor is perfectly accurate, so Closed Loop helps the BMSK to hold a tight AFR in cruise and also to learn corrections, including errors in the air pressure sensor.

    So a problem of riding through a pass is that there isn't a lot of time to learn any corrections that are required based on barometric sensor inaccuracies and since starting is an Open Loop condition, your engine counts on the sensors. I don't know how accurate the sensor is and therefore how well it initially compensates. At 12000 feet the engine requires 40% less fuel, which is a huge difference from sea level. The BMSK never changes the AFR based on altitude, just the amount of fuel delivered to reach its AFR targets.

    Regarding the AF-XIED, basically if you have it set for 4% enrichment, that is the new standard for all altitudes. However, the barometric pressure sensor and closed loop are still fully functional and your engine should run fine and eventually adapt to the conditions.

    If you've had trouble at 12000 feet, you will probably still have trouble. I think at that altitude I would consider cracking the throttle 5 degrees for cold starting. (I don't know if the idle stepper motors do that automatically at high altitude.) The rationale would be that starting with the throttle closed doesn't allow much air in even at sea level. At 12000 feet it only gets 60% of that small number.
    RB

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    Thanks, Roger. That is what I thought based on my experience last year. BTW, I was amazed at the power loss at high altitudes while riding in CO.

    One other issue I'm hoping the AF-XIED will solve is that at high ambient temperatures (90+), my GSA will occasionally stall if the throttle is opened just a percent or two while starting from a stop. Normally this will happen after idling for a minute or two after the bike has been fully warmed up. Unfortunately this seems to happen when riding in traffic and only happens a few times per month. In cooler temps, below 50, this is not an issue which is what I would expect. Others with the camhead also experience this condition and there are several threads on ADVRIDER about this. I did talk with my dealer but, of course, they never heard about the problem.

    I am really looking forward to using the AF-XIED!

    Thanks, again for your work in this area.

    Dave

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