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Thread: 95 RT plugs

  1. #1
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    95 RT plugs

    Iridium1.jpeg
    From left to right; left bottom-left top-right bottom-right top.
    Iridium2.jpeg
    Left bottom-left top
    Iridium3.jpeg
    Right bottom-right top

    Plugs are Iridium. Used for 3500 miles. Bike runs fine, milage 47-49 mpg - single rider with only the topbox.
    Pictures not that good. Right side always a bit ?oilier?, although I?ve learned not to have too much oil in the engine.
    Do they look about right? I feel I could run leaner. Ignition is Silent Hektik.
    Sincerely
    Hans
    Norway

  2. #2
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    Gap? Looks huge.
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  3. #3
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    "Bike runs fine, milage 47-49 MPG"

    Nothing wrong with that.

    The color looks O.K. to me, the insulator on right/bottom plug looks funny.
    I agree with Kurt about the gaps.
    Too lean is a bad thing, you are not there yet.
    I like to run the NGK, BP6ES plugs, But I have not had any problems with other brands.

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    Tanks for comments! I've never paid attention to gap, know nothing about it. Will have to look into that.
    Insulator on the right bottom looks "dirty". Is it burnt oil? It seems to me that right hand plug(s) always are "dirtier" than the left side, on my bike. I thought that was normal, something to do with the oil circuit?
    I wish you all a nice Thanksgiving!
    Hans

  5. #5
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    We use those Iridiums on our Hexheads

    Those pics are not sharp enough to me to see the tiny electrode the Iridiums have...may be a reason it looks odd.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

  6. #6
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    If all the parts are still there and connected, remember that any crankcase blowby is sent through the carbs. This the the most likely source of oil on plugs for a bike this new.
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

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    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    If all the parts are still there and connected, remember that any crankcase blowby is sent through the carbs. This the the most likely source of oil on plugs for a bike this new.
    Do you really mean "blow-by? Because the term has to do with piston rings worn or seized enough from carbon to allow some of the compression mix to "blow-by" into the crankcase. Has nothing to do with the carbs.

    I think you are referring to the "breather" air from the crankcase with some oil mist in it, being directed back through the engine via the intake system - thus going through the carbs.

  8. #8
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    Breather air. Any theory why it would affect right side more than left, if that is the cause.
    My 95RT got less than 30K miles, meter says 42598 km to be exact.
    I would claim right plug was messier before, until I started keeping the oil level on the low side.
    Hans

  9. #9
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    Earlier models sent mist to right carb only...they diverted to both later on...probably your situation. Worth a check on the routing under the top cover. One side could be plugged.
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  10. #10
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    That I'll check!
    Hans

  11. #11
    #4869 DennisDarrow's Avatar
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    Kent, once again is totally correct.

    Enter "Engine Blowby" into Wikepedia and one gets:

    Crankcase ventilation system
    escape in a controlled manner from the crankcase of an internal combustion engine . but continual amount of blow-by, which occurs when some ... 14 KB (2,268 words) - 16:32, 16 November 2013

    or

    Crankcase (redirect from Blowby)
    In an internal combustion engine of the reciprocating type , the crankcase is the ... blow-by than the crankcase ventilation system can handle. ... 9 KB (1,249 words) - 17:58, 28 October 2013


    on and on.....................God bless........Dennis
    Last edited by DennisDarrow; 11-29-2013 at 10:53 PM.

  12. #12
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimmylee View Post
    Do you really mean "blow-by? Because the term has to do with piston rings worn or seized enough from carbon to allow some of the compression mix to "blow-by" into the crankcase. Has nothing to do with the carbs.

    I think you are referring to the "breather" air from the crankcase with some oil mist in it, being directed back through the engine via the intake system - thus going through the carbs.
    Indeed I was.
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  13. #13
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    Ran across this post on the Hex/Camheads:

    http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/showthre...l=1#post718305

    So, the gap should be around 0.8mm (~0.032")...somewhere else I read the gap as 1.1mm (~0.043"). Hard to judge from the pictures, but they really appear to be gapped pretty wide??
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisDarrow View Post
    Kent, once again is totally correct.

    Enter "Engine Blowby" into Wikepedia and one gets:

    Crankcase ventilation system
    escape in a controlled manner from the crankcase of an internal combustion engine . but continual amount of blow-by, which occurs when some ... 14 KB (2,268 words) - 16:32, 16 November 2013

    or

    Crankcase (redirect from Blowby)
    In an internal combustion engine of the reciprocating type , the crankcase is the ... blow-by than the crankcase ventilation system can handle. ... 9 KB (1,249 words) - 17:58, 28 October 2013


    on and on.....................God bless........Dennis

    From:Bot-the-oil-guy: http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/blowby.html, and every other person I have met who races motorcycles and autos!

    WHAT IS BLOW-BY?

    What is Blow-by? Blow-by occurs when the explosion that occurs in your engine's combustion chamber causes fuel, air and moisture to be forced past the rings into the crankcase. Your engine's rings must maintain an excellent fit in order to contain the pressure. The causes of blow-by: wear, soot and deposits As rings and cylinder liners wear away they are less capable of maintaining this seal. Consequently as a car ages the amount of blow-by that occurs can increase. Soot and deposits left over from incomplete combustion that collect on the rings can also inhibit their seal worsening blow-by. The effects of blow-by: loss of horsepower and oil contamination and dilution Blow-by inhibits performance because it results in a loss of compression. When the expanding gases slip past the rings they cannot as effectively push the piston down and make the vehicle go. As a result the car will have less horsepower. This also results in a loss of fuel economy. When the fuel, air and moisture slip into the crankcase they contaminate and dilute the oil in the crankcase. Among the many gasses in your compression chamber are unburned fuel, moisture, sulfur dioxide and soot. Once these gasses slip into your crankcase they can dilute into your engine causing great damage. The detergents and Molybdenum Disulfide work together to clean the soot and deposits off of your rings allowing them to better seal the combustion chamber. The Moly fills the crevices in the cylinder walls providing a better seal:

    He also has accompanying pics to illustrate.

    I have never heard anyone ever refer to crankcase ventilation systems using the word "blow-by."
    Last edited by jimmylee; 11-30-2013 at 02:24 PM.

  15. #15
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    I am sure it has been said above in some form, but we need to differentiate between crankcase pressure due to the piston downstroke and "blow-by" commonly known as combustion pressure finding its way past the rings.
    The former is a common problem on many engines and resulting oil coming out of the crankcase breather. For some reason, this is more pronounced in dry sump engine designs, where either oil rings are worn or a check valve in the pump is not properly working and makes oil accumulate in the crankcase after the engine is shut off. Upon re-start, this oil is forced out through the breather and into wherever this connects to. Mostly the carbs.
    Many Harley owners who change their carbs to some aftermarket design, which does away with the breather connection and routs this to the outside, will have an oil spot under their bike. Not a sign of a leaking engine, but rather the result of a breather spewing oil.

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