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Thread: Simple But "possibly" Brilliant Tip 2

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  1. #1
    Registered User Mark H's Avatar
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    Nov 2013
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    Simple But "possibly" Brilliant Tip 2

    The previous post about "Simple But Brilliant Tip" was really interesting. If you didn't see it, it was about which foot you place on the ground when you pull up and the merits or otherwise of braking till stopped with the right foot and touching down with the left.
    Please excuse me adding my 2 cents worth so late and in a new post but I was curios to see how many people had traveled from left to right hand drive countries - say England to Europe. Does it make any difference being on the opposite side of the road as to which foot you touch down with?

    Does road camber play a part? Or does the oncoming traffic influence you?

    Not saying it would, but in Australia we ride (most of the time ) on the left side of the road and we are instructed to place left foot on the ground and maintain braking with the right. This mean you are predominantly foot down to the camber of the road and as a result lean away from oncoming traffic.
    I personally think both of these factors are misleading but it would be interesting to hear from you guys who ride on the right side of a road.

    My personal reasons for left down and right foot breaking till stopped are partly what was mentioned in the other post - more fine control when coming to a stop (no last minute nose dive from over active front brake) and the left foot drops you down the gears and you pull up in first gear with left foot down just as you come to a stop. This is possibly less of an issue if you ride a BMW with Duo-lever or Para-lever front ends or the dual braking system (bit of rear when the front is applied).
    In addition though - the benefit of left foot down and right on the foot brake is that you are set for the take off. You can leave a little rear brake on as you pull away which does two things. It loads the engine a little and provides a more stable takeoff (particularly at slow speeds). This tends to pull the rear down a fraction and the geometry of the bike is much more stable. I think this may be a left over from dirt bike riding.
    BUT it also leaves your brake light on which is great at holding the car behind you at bay for a fraction longer which can be handy (and safer). They tend not to notice you move as soon.
    If the traffic pulls up again and you need to stop quickly they are are half a car length or more back already.
    Don't go too far (10 feet or so) before releasing the foot brake or you won't flash your lights if you do need to pull up again.

    Anyway - just my way.
    Regards

    Mark H
    2012 - R1200R White Aluminium Metallic

  2. #2
    Registered User
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    I can assure you wind plays a part. Yesterday it was so windy that both feet were required. Today does not seem any better.

  3. #3
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    I remember the older ('60s and early '70s) British bikes were set up opposite to the Japanese bikes and had the brake on the left side, gear on the right.

    I am now wondering if this was one of the reasons for that set up.

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