Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Temporary ABS Removal 2004 R1150RT

  1. #1
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,213

    Temporary ABS Removal 2004 R1150RT

    I may be removing my ABS pump this weekend to get at the fuel distributor and voltage regulator (if I need to to get to the VR). The BMW manual calls for emptying the brake fluid from the system. Is that needed or can I just contain the leakage?

    Any other tips on the ABS removal?
    RB

  2. #2
    Registered User dieselyoda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Winnipeg, MB, Canada
    Posts
    409

    Start with disconnecting the battery

    This is all my opinion based on my experience and is probably different than what a specific service manual might offer. I always start with disconnecting the battery. I don't have a great explanation why but a habit of mine that I have never regretted and I really don't want to guess what might go wrong if I don't disconnect the battery. Some manufacturers demand that you do.

    I always leave fluid in the system. I take the lines off and cap/plug them to keep crap out. I don't like to guess if a master cylinder has a residual pressure valve but I have discovered that if a master cylinder runs empty and the residual pressure valve is in rough shape, you will never get a firm feeling from it ever again. For me, I have always had to replace the master cylinder afterwards no matter what I do to try to get it to recover.

    I also believe the less often you open a system, the less likely you are to introduce contaminants, like dirt or atmospheric humidity. I like to keep as much of the system closed for as long as I can until I'm ready to bleed.

    Then again, I have a buddy that has a completely different approach and it works for him.
    1997 R1100RT (Restored Basket Case) , 1981 KZ 440 LTD (Restored Basket Case)
    1986 K75S(the beutch), 1993 K1100RS (blown engine), 1997 Chev Short Box (4x4 with an LT1)
    "Life isn't about how fast or how high, it's about how well you bounce."

  3. #3
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,213
    I left the system full and removed the hydraulic lines from the ABS unit one at a time, capping each line and connector as I went. I still managed to spill a half teaspoon of brake fluid which I cleaned up promptly.
    Last edited by Roger 04 RT; 11-09-2013 at 02:56 AM.

  4. #4
    Registered User dieselyoda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Winnipeg, MB, Canada
    Posts
    409
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger 04 RT View Post
    I left the system full and removed the hydraulic lines from the ABS unit one at a time, capping each line and connector as I went. I still managed to spill a half teaspoon of brake fluid which I cleaned up promptly.
    You did better than I usually do. When it comes to brake fluid, I seem to find a way to leak it into everything, including my beer. I hate the stuff but if you do spill, a little bit of gasoline de-ice like Methyl Hydrate works well followed by hot, soapy water to keep the brake fluid from eating paint, rubber, the soles of your shoes, the neighbors cat and or the five year old condoms in your wallet.

    I'm fixed. I really don't know why I kept them.

    The other caution is I usually, with motorcycles in particular, jam a rag between the brake handle and grip to prevent an accidental bump from spraying brake fluid all over again. For the rear, a little bit of wire or a whole roll of duck tape to keep the pedal up.

    For the family set of wheels, I jam a 2x4 under the brake pedal. If I forget about the 2x4, the brakes are always hard and I have a very long driveway from my shop. It's so long that when someone gets to the end, I can't see their tail lights, warranty is over.

    There is tons of great advice about bleeding your brakes available on these forums. My caution is to read through the advice carefully so that every step becomes simple and natural for you. Kind of like you are comfortable enough to do it without looking at the instructions twice.

    For a little bit of controversy during your adventure: Pressure Bleed or Vacuum Bleed?

    I certainly have an opinion and like always, my opinions are always right
    1997 R1100RT (Restored Basket Case) , 1981 KZ 440 LTD (Restored Basket Case)
    1986 K75S(the beutch), 1993 K1100RS (blown engine), 1997 Chev Short Box (4x4 with an LT1)
    "Life isn't about how fast or how high, it's about how well you bounce."

  5. #5
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,213
    Since I don't own a vacuum bleeder, I've only got one choice (although a friend uses a vacuum cleaner and 2 liter coke bottle). It will be a sequencial, pump pressure bleed for me.

    I don't bother with the tape and wire since I station a guard dog near the bike when I've got it apart ...

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    maine
    Posts
    190
    Roger, with what and how did you cap off lines ect.?

    Mark

  7. #7
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,213
    Quote Originally Posted by mark from maine View Post
    Roger, with what and how did you cap off lines ect.?

    Mark
    Mark, I cut four 1" pieces of fuel tank vent hose and stuck a tight fitting screw in one end. A cap your be better as the 1" of hose interfered a little.

    Other than that a small syringe to take out a thimble full of brake fluid from each opening would have helped.

    All in all not a hard job. Oh, tape off the electrical connectors once open and don't get fluid in them.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •