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Thread: oil pan torque

  1. #1
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    oil pan torque

    my manual doesn't give the torque spec for pan bolts for r75/7 also does anybody offer kits with all of the fill/drain plug washers

  2. #2
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    The oil pan bolt torque is pretty small...around 7 ft-lbs...read the values here:

    http://bmwmotorcycletech.info/torquevalues.htm

    You would be better off using a nut-driver screwdriver and evenly tightening up the bolts in a criss-cross pattern, bring them up to a new tightness. This way you have a reduced chance of stripping these fasteners.

    As for complete kits, I think you have to buy things individually, but you could check with places like BeemerBoneyard to see if they might carry something like that.
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

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    Quote Originally Posted by u5430 View Post
    my manual doesn't give the torque spec for pan bolts for r75/7 also does anybody offer kits with all of the fill/drain plug washers
    I just replaced all of my washers. I think there are only 2 sizes. One size for the drive shaft drain & fill, and the other size for the engine drain, final drive drain & fill, and trans drain & fill.

    Here is a concept that is interesting. All of the blind threaded holes for the oil pan bolts (except 1) are drilled and tapped around 1/4" deeper than the bolts being used. The exception is the one just under the oil filter cover.

    These bolts could be replaced with longer ones which would give more thread strength, around 30 -40% more.

    Also check gasket. Some gaskets used are like really spongy rubber (my bike had this type when I purchased it last Christmas) so if torqued as specified, the gasket would squeeze out. I purchased a new one from Max's BMW and it is the better, harder type gasket which does allow proper torquing. Be sure to check after a week as 2 of mine (when I had the rubbery gasket) actually backed out, because they couldn't be torqued properly due to the gasket squeezing dilemma.

  4. #4
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    Torque

    Quote Originally Posted by u5430 View Post
    my manual doesn't give the torque spec for pan bolts for r75/7 also does anybody offer kits with all of the fill/drain plug washers
    The sizes are as follows. Unless of course, the previous owner stripped the threads and went to another size. The crush washers should only be used once! Use them too many times and you will strip the threads out of the aluminum housings.

    07 11 9 963 300 Oil pan drain, Trans. fill, rear drive fill.
    07 11 9 963 200 Trans. and rear drive drain.
    07 11 9 963 130 Driveshaft fill and drain
    Boxerbruce

  5. #5
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    The oil pan bolt torque is pretty small...around 7 ft-lbs...
    Bum suggests less, 5-5.6 ft lb.

    I suggest you use inch-pounds - the "resolution" is a bit finer on an inch-pound torque wrench (a 1/4" drive torque wrench is a lot smaller too).

    12 inch pounds to the foot pound: 5 ft. pounds = 60 inch pounds; 5.6 = 67.2 in-pounds (12 x 5.6)

    But that's just my $.02USD
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

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    Always used a smidgen of anti-seize on those threads, not each time, but after a look see. Wipe with the rag, a look, and if needed a very small touch. Maybe others can comment. Even with a new pan gasket last year there's a little tell-tale oily black smudging by this autumn. Give it a wipe, doesn't matter, these bikes are for riding and (2 cents) should look well ridden. This year got a nice rock chip in fairing, just missed the pricey headlight glass.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 8ninety8 View Post
    Always used a smidgen of anti-seize on those threads, not each time, but after a look see. Wipe with the rag, a look, and if needed a very small touch. Maybe others can comment. Even with a new pan gasket last year there's a little tell-tale oily black smudging by this autumn. Give it a wipe, doesn't matter, these bikes are for riding and (2 cents) should look well ridden. This year got a nice rock chip in fairing, just missed the pricey headlight glass.
    When in High School, I worked at a motorcycle shop that sold Hondas and, of course, BMWs. I was a huge Honda fan, and hated those "old man's BMWs."

    The lead mechanic, a racer, who raced Hondas, personally owned an R69S. It looked dirty and whipped. I used to kid him saying that he should clean that thing up. I used to clean my Honda with a Q-Tip! His answer was, "I'd rather ride it than clean it."

    Three BMWs and 40 wise years later, I now know what he means. I love riding it! The only difference, is that I also like cleaning it. It is more pleasurable to me to ride it when it is clean!

    Interestingly, I also used to try to prod him into racing me. Of course, I was thinking from light to light. His answer? "OK, how about from here to Columbus and back?" We lived in Canton Ohio, about 120 miles from Columbus. I knew what he meant!

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    Registered User b25bsaboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lmo1131 View Post
    Bum suggests less, 5-5.6 ft lb.

    I suggest you use inch-pounds - the "resolution" is a bit finer on an inch-pound torque wrench (a 1/4" drive torque wrench is a lot smaller too).

    12 inch pounds to the foot pound: 5 ft. pounds = 60 inch pounds; 5.6 = 67.2 in-pounds (12 x 5.6)

    But that's just my $.02USD
    Agree with Lew!
    Rick MacPherson
    Success is Not a Destination, But a Journey.
    Accredited Motorcycle Appraiser
    1968 BSA Starfire, 1976 BMW R75/6, 2009 R1200RT

  9. #9
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    Perhaps silicone gaskets are still available.

    These were a nice solution for instances where the valve cover mating surfaces were less than perfect, although of course they are a PITA when removing/replacing the cover.

    They're a pretty good solution for the oil pan, too. When I purchased them years ago the instructions included the recommended torque value and the recommendation to use Loctite on the screws. I'd think Loctite a much better recommendation than antiseize for these screws. Perhaps might reduce the tendancy to overtighten, too, as you wouldn't need to.

    FWIW silicone float bowl gaskets were a joke, as just a hint of gasoline contacting them caused them to swell beyond usefullness. The vender for these has been on these forums or the airhead list and has surely discontinued them by now.

    The paper pan gasket from BMW is similar to the OE valve cover gaskets, i.e. is manufactured with built-on adhesive. It's on the side with the printing and this side is installed to contact the hot side, i.e. the head or the engine block, not the cover or pan. Properly installed, the valve cover gasket is reusable for at least a decade, assuming you don't disturb its adhesion to the head.
    Kent Christensen
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    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  10. #10
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    The silicone pan gaskets can be had at Rocky Point. I am converting my Airheads to these.

  11. #11
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    Gaskets

    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    Perhaps silicone gaskets are still available.

    These were a nice solution for instances where the valve cover mating surfaces were less than perfect, although of course they are a PITA when removing/replacing the cover.

    They're a pretty good solution for the oil pan, too. When I purchased them years ago the instructions included the recommended torque value and the recommendation to use Loctite on the screws. I'd think Loctite a much better recommendation than antiseize for these screws. Perhaps might reduce the tendancy to overtighten, too, as you wouldn't need to.

    FWIW silicone float bowl gaskets were a joke, as just a hint of gasoline contacting them caused them to swell beyond usefullness. The vender for these has been on these forums or the airhead list and has surely discontinued them by now.

    The paper pan gasket from BMW is similar to the OE valve cover gaskets, i.e. is manufactured with built-on adhesive. It's on the side with the printing and this side is installed to contact the hot side, i.e. the head or the engine block, not the cover or pan. Properly installed, the valve cover gasket is reusable for at least a decade, assuming you don't disturb its adhesion to the head.
    Look carefully at those gaskets. They are foolproof! You can't put them on but one way.
    Boxerbruce

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