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Thread: Does tire pressure make that much of a difference?

  1. #31
    Registered User Bob_M's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=jimmylee;902612]
    Quote Originally Posted by DennisDarrow View Post

    Who takes Snowbum's word as Gospel?
    Is this a poll? Snowbum provides excellent advice which I have been wise to follow.

  2. #32
    Old Salt MEAirhd's Avatar
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    T. Waits.."Got to get behind the mule.. in the mornin and plow"

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  3. #33
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    [QUOTE=Bob_M;902673]
    Quote Originally Posted by jimmylee View Post

    Is this a poll? Snowbum provides excellent advice which I have been wise to follow.
    I, too, think Snowbum is a great source for information. But I don't know anyone who thinks his words are "Gospel" - at least not on par with the "Gospel" that I know. If there is someone, they will be mistaken, because I am sure that they will be disappointed with something he says or recommends.

    I am wondering, however, why one would think this one is an impostor? When I first read his msg, I went and checked the source and it looked genuine to me. I guess others did not!

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisDarrow View Post
    Kurt.......ONCE AGAIN........thanks for what you and the other MODS do on here. That said, you know me and how I truly detest folks that run their mouth on here just to get thread count credibility; but NOW..............Some guy who plagarizes one of the true folks that one can go to in order to get a real and valid opinion as to what is going on with the mechanics of the "Airhead" design motorcyles. Seems that this fraud should be brought out and villified rather than just let it ride...........God bless.........Dennis
    Who plegarized anything? I can't find it. Kurt didn't. So who did?

    Seems like you got your knickers in a ruffle for nothing.


    Talk about . . . well, I won't continue.

  5. #35
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    Come on, guys....can't we just get back to talking about tires and pressures? Has it gotten that far into winter already??? Wow, have I just asked for a tire thread?

    Move on, please.
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  6. #36
    #4869 DennisDarrow's Avatar
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    Ahhhh.......NOW I see what happened and I apologize to ROBERT/Snowbum1 and others on here. I did make a mistake of NOT hitting on his name and checking out WHO this person was. If one reads, which most of you do, I am defending Robert, what he does, his knowledge and experience, and his contributions to keeping our machines on the road. I was premature in his defense as I really thought that a person came on here and was passing himself off as Robert.

    By the way, someone copied and pasted the question of "who takes Snowbum as gospel" and it appears that it is MY comment...........NOT

    Thanks for understanding this and I apologize for the confusion. I am proud of what I try to bring to this forum and at the same time don't just make contributions in order to UP my thread count and credibility. So.............As Kurt says.......Let's get on with it.........God bless........Dennis

  7. #37
    P Monk
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    What does threadcount have to do with tire air pressures?

    I have heard of threadcount was important when the bride was shopping for sheets. (Joke)

    Seriously though I have always run the tires at recommended pressure as on sticker on bike. 30 lbs front and rear actually. I am hoping to be able to ride the /6 to the Harvest Classic this weekend and am going to try maybe 33 and 36 and see how she feels so this thread was beneficial to me.
    P. Monk
    74 R90/6 (also know by bride as the Black Hole). 09 R1200 GS. My wife, 1953 model who has survived aplastic anemia and a bone marrow transplant.

  8. #38
    Registered User georgej's Avatar
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    Hey Dpmonk,after you make the adjustment to the air pressure can you let us know if it made any difference?
    1978 R100RS
    1978 R80/7
    1977 Triumph Bonneville
    1980 Honda XL500S

  9. #39
    Bill Clark
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    Correct Tire Pressure?

    Actually what Robert says is right on the mark. I learned a couple of sets of tires ago that the pressures under the seat are not to be believed, unless, you are running "classic" tires. And of those that are "classic", I would suggest that the compounds and construction they are using are at least somewhat more advanced than they were back in, say, 1978. I am running Pirelli Sport Demons on my 78 R100RS currently. I traded in my Dunlops, due to strange wear, due to running around underinflated it appears. (I think that lower than what they should have been pressure-wise contributed to the early demise of my Metzlers too. I ran Michelins for two stints before the Dunlops and got good wear and handling, but was running a suggested higher pressure rather than the bike label). I talked to the mechanic at the place I purchased the Pirellis and he suggested running slightly below the sidewall pressure which is 42psi cold. I started off with 38psi front and 40 rear. I rode to several events after my change to the Pirelli and found the handling to be very nice in the mountains of Idaho and Washington. I also played around with rear spring tension versus load on the bike. These all have very important effects on the handling, because essentially you are changing the geometry of the bike itself. (I learned all about this at the Salem rally in one of the Rider University classes for high speed cornering. Which brings me to another point, I have been riding since 1979, (my RS since 85) and had never really had any of that explained to me, just another reason to try to attend the MOA rally, imho).
    So basically what I am saying is check with the manufacturer if nothing else. Play with your pressures. Another interesting thing is that I bought a little infrared thermometer to see just how much the pressure changed with temperature. On a really hot day, the pressure went up 10% easily with what seems like a big increase in temp (around 15-20 degrees), regardless of whether I was on the freeway or playing in the hills a little bit. And THAT is the reason they give you a max cold temp. It accounts for the temp/pressure rise that you should experience in normal use without exceding the absolute design maximum pressure of the tire, hot). Several have posted that they run a little lower pressure for racing. I believe that will cause the tire to run hotter and increase the temperature which will alter the compound somewhat and the handling. (Just my opinion). I have had a tire go down on me slowly and definitely felt the change in handling so I believe I would now know if the the pressures weren't correct, as in too low. I think my RS and I have finally come to an agreement with each other that I will closely monitor the tire pressures and spring load to maintain the proper geometry the bike was designed with and the bike will bless me with many more years of fine motorcycling. And I might suggest that almost all of the tires I have run, (except the Continentals which were too hard and never felt right to me), or that anyone runs, will perform and wear great with small differences (sport touring types my only experience), provided you get the most definitive pressure for your application from the manufacturer if possible, maintain that pressure and adjust your rear spring tension and tire pressures for your load to keep the original geometry of your bike intact.
    (Note: Your results may vary. NOT written by a professional writer on a closed course computer). HAH! Feel free to fire away

  10. #40
    #4869 DennisDarrow's Avatar
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    Tire Pressure Monitors

    Robert and Bill give a very accurate description with air pressure and how they are different than what may be on the frame sticker or owner's manual. Surely NOT to get off topic, as one guy may alude, but has anyone used TPMs? Tire pressure monitors.

    I first began using them with my Airstream maybe 4 years ago to alert me of not only slow leaks but blow outs. On an aluminum travel trailer this can cause totally catostropic damage to a wheel well when the tire begins to flop around inside the well within perhaps 1/4 mile........

    Saved me 3 times that blowouts happened when traveling out in the 4 corners in the summer and a couple of times indicated slow leaks. Yes, the temps of the tires with the blowouts were high and could have been contributing factors along with faulty tires.

    2 years ago I began to use it on my /6. What I really like is that the monitor advises me after the bike has sat for a period of time and lost pressure. I don't know about others but that is a little chore that I really don't enjoy.......checking and then dragging out the compressor hose..........The monitor also let me know about a slow leak LONG before there was a noticeable handling problem.

    Where I also use the monitors is on my Merc SLK 320 to keep it in top roller skate handling condition; but this is a motorcycle forum and surely not to get off topic..............THEY WORK........God bless........Dennis

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisDarrow View Post
    Robert and Bill give a very accurate description with air pressure and how they are different than what may be on the frame sticker or owner's manual. Surely NOT to get off topic, as one guy may alude, but has anyone used TPMs? Tire pressure monitors.

    I first began using them with my Airstream maybe 4 years ago to alert me of not only slow leaks but blow outs. On an aluminum travel trailer this can cause totally catostropic damage to a wheel well when the tire begins to flop around inside the well within perhaps 1/4 mile........

    Saved me 3 times that blowouts happened when traveling out in the 4 corners in the summer and a couple of times indicated slow leaks. Yes, the temps of the tires with the blowouts were high and could have been contributing factors along with faulty tires.

    2 years ago I began to use it on my /6. What I really like is that the monitor advises me after the bike has sat for a period of time and lost pressure. I don't know about others but that is a little chore that I really don't enjoy.......checking and then dragging out the compressor hose..........The monitor also let me know about a slow leak LONG before there was a noticeable handling problem.

    Where I also use the monitors is on my Merc SLK 320 to keep it in top roller skate handling condition; but this is a motorcycle forum and surely not to get off topic..............THEY WORK........God bless........Dennis

    This sounds like a very good idea. Will they work on tube-type tires? Where did you get yours? And how much are they?

    I find myself ALWAYS being nervous that the tires are going to be low or borderline, so I check every other ride or so. Though I have never ever had a tire problem while riding, I don't want to either!

  12. #42
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    [QUOTE=DennisDarrow;903121]... but has anyone used TPMs? Tire pressure monitors./QUOTE]

    My bike has a TPMS that came installed on the bike. Likely all BMWs now come so equipped. My system does not measure precisely the same as my manual gage, but it is close (within 1 to 2 psi) and it is consistent. Therefore I have gotten used to how it measures and have therefore grown to trust its information. I keep the TPMS readout showing on the computer screen of the bike as I ride, therefore I will be alerted to any tire condition that loses air pressure. Bottom line ... TPMS works well for me.
    Royce
    On the coast of Kansas
    2012 F800ST

  13. #43
    P Monk
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    tpms on tube tires

    http://www.vulcantire.com/pressurepro_mc_sys.htm

    The question about tube type tires got me to wondering, Seems that there are a lot of aftermarket monitoring systems that should work with tube type tires where the pressure sensor is the valve stem cap.

    I have never had tpms before cut my wife's Town and Country started showing alarms and sure enough There was a big nail in the tire. Pressure never got below 28 psi. The above url is just one of many on the market.
    P. Monk
    74 R90/6 (also know by bride as the Black Hole). 09 R1200 GS. My wife, 1953 model who has survived aplastic anemia and a bone marrow transplant.

  14. #44
    #4869 DennisDarrow's Avatar
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    The system that we use is a Hawk Tire Pressure Monitoring System:

    http://www.tpms.ca/

    They mount on the valve stem and measure pressure and temperature. I have perhaps 50K miles on the various vehicles that we mount them on. In addition to the motorcycle, they go on the Airstream, F250, SLK, and the livestock trailer. Yes, we use the same basic set for 8 wheels and switch them out for the way/vehicle we want to use them on.........The trailers use 4 with the truck making the need for 8.......Settings/values for the tires are easy to change out for how we are gonna use them.

    The livestock trailer is the most important of all as not only is the rig piloted by my wife on the way to various shows and deliveries of stock; but extra insurance that she is safe on the road when gone a couple of days down the road and the many $$$$$$ worth of stock is safe.

    Anyway, good stuff and there are several on the market.........Just do some research on "tire pressure monitoring system" as your search word/phrase..........God bless........Dennis

  15. #45
    Day Dreaming ... happy wanderer's Avatar
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    This thread coincided with putting my red smoke '82 RS (LOVE that bike!) back on the road after sitting for a while waiting for me to fix the oil pressure relief valve and to stop being distracted by the other toys in the shed. I read Snobum's info and what folks had to say here and realized that what the bike sticker says and reality of running "modern" Metzeler LaserTec tires were out of sync. Well, lasertecs have been around for quite a while but you know what I mean. And while they are tubeless I do run tubes in them in my snowflake wheels.

    I decided to take Snobum's advice and knock 3 or 4 lbs off of the max tire pressure (on the tire that is) and went with 36 in the front and 39 in the rear. It seems to work OK and I noticed that the bike is a LOT easier to roll out of the shed at those pressures!

    I really don't know what to look for handling wise when it comes to tire pressures. While a very soft tire is quite noticeable front or rear the difference because the bike gets all smarmy, a couple of pounds in either wheel is just not immediately obvious to me. I do like to ride pretty quick but have never raced motorcycles on a proper track.

    So what should I look for to get it just right? I am also curious to hear what pressures fellow R100RS owners are finding works best on these more modern tires.
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
    '81 R80G/S, '82 R100RS, '00 R1100RT

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