Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 16 to 26 of 26

Thread: Fuel Contamination

  1. #16
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    1,642
    Quote Originally Posted by junkjohn View Post
    It seems these stations are being very negligent with there tanks, because even back in the 70s when I was pumping fuel as a kid, we would put some kind of water finding paste on the big stick when we checked the tank levels every day. Man have things changed.
    When was the last time you had someone pump your gas??

    BTW - I too pumped gas for tuition in the late 70's
    Cave contents: 99 R11RS, 2013 Toyota Tacoma, 03 Simplicity Legacy, 97 Stihl FS75, Dewalt DW625 & DW744

  2. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    319
    I use 4 ounces of Techron in my R1100R's tank. To get the quantity right, I filled a measuring cup with 4 ounces of water, then poured the water into any empty plastic water bottle and marked the water level on the outside with a strip of duct tape. Pour the water out and set the bottle aside until any remaining evaporates. It sits on my workbench until needed.

  3. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    80
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveAikens View Post
    BMW Fuel Additive is a formulation of Chevron Techron. The packaging is BMWs color choice, Chevron Techron is in the same bottle - just red. That said, it's not a big deal to pour in about half a bottle. Exact measurement really isn't vital in this case. Regardless what you pour in - the bike will burn it just fine.
    Hi Steve,

    Yeah, I just wagged it at the pump and actually came pretty close by putting in 5 oz instead of the recommended 6.6 oz per full tank.

    Of course, it's easy to measure in the home garage, but I didn't have a graduated container on the road so was surprised to see that the BMW bottle lacked simple measurement graduations on it.

    Not a big deal, but it shows how packaging can look pretty, but be a bit useless to the consumer.

    Enjoyed your story about traveling in NM. I've actually attended the races at Ruidoso Downs, drank a beer or two in Cloudcroft, and have had the pleasure of smelling the cow pens in Clovis when the wind was right.

  4. #19
    Proud Veteran SteveAikens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Clovis, NM
    Posts
    933
    Been a while since you've been here Lee? We don't have to wait for the wind any more, we have so many feedlots now that we have the Southwest Cheese Plant here, all we have to do is open a door....

    I like it here. After a while, the smell is only rarely a problem - but when it is, it can take your breath away.

    NM is a pretty sweet state for me. I live in Clovis - the high desert. Virtually no traffic to speak of, roads are decent for the southwest and I can ride to mountains within a couple hours, whenever I want. Granted, not many curves until we get there, but I have clients all over west TX and central and east NM. I can't take the bike to work with them very often so dead straight, dead flat decent roads are a good thing when I want to get there fast.

    Shoot me an email next time you head my way - coffee's on me.
    Nom de Plume:
    Steve Aikens, Clovis, NM
    BMW MOA #6218
    IBA# 442

  5. #20
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    United States of America
    Posts
    12

    Startron & StaBil Marine formula

    Several of us here in Michigan (not necessarily BMW owners) use either Marine Formula StaBil or Startron. I actually use 1/3 Stabil to 2/3rd's Startron. Been using this mixture for 3 years now in all of my gas engines & boat. In my 1300GT I usually fill up at home for the riding I've been able to do this summer. I also use Techron occasionally as well. The Startron seems to get good reviews with the ethanol mess. If you buy the "better" Startron (most concentrated version) you can easily pack it while on a trip to put in the tank.
    2009 K1300GT Blue
    1983 Honda CB1100F Blue
    1980 Honda CBX-A Black
    Blue or Black is Fastest

  6. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    271
    Quote Originally Posted by kmolldenver View Post
    ...

    Lastly, I have no idea if any of this applies to diesel (for automotive/truck purchases), but I KNOW that these facts apply for gas.
    I believe most of it is true for diesel powered vehicles as well.

    Water in a modern diesel injection system will cause some very expensive damage very quickly. It usually entails replacement of the entire fuel system at a cost of many thousand dollars. Diesels have water separation devices but they don't always work, esp. if overwhelmed by a huge volume of water in the fuel.

    I have an F-250 diesel pickup to tow our fifth wheel (and to occasionally haul a Beemer). I'm very careful where I buy fuel and to drain the water separator regularly (altho I've never found any water at all in it...knock on wood).
    1983 R100RS (Sold)
    2004 R1150RT
    BMW MOA 181289
    ABC 13558

  7. #22
    Registered User dieselyoda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Winnipeg, MB, Canada
    Posts
    543

    I don't want to sound smarterer than I am,

    I did a seminar for the vocational teachers that teach young mechanics, on fuel last summer. I did it because most mechanics don't actually know what fuel is being used. There is a wide variety of gasoline and diesel products on the market. They look the same at the filling station but they aren't.

    My comments are universal but may not apply universally, if that made any sense.

    Gasoline with Ethanol is always a grain extracted blended. Varying amounts of Ethanol are reported as the maximum amount. However, small amounts may not be reported at the pump. Blends as low as E2 are extremely hygroscopic. It can take moisture form the atmosphere readily.

    Diesel fuel with the renewable resource bio-fuel can be anything from animal fat all the way to seed/bean extracted. Again, maximums are reported at the pump but minimums aren't mandated to be reported. Any Bio-Diesel HAS water in it.

    In my experience, gasoline or diesel, has a shelf life of about six weeks, less, in my opinion during warmer ambient. Either is prone to microbial contamination. Some of these bugs eat skin and will kill you.

    My focus during these seminars was PPE, Personal Protection Equipment.

    I can substantiate my claims with some very graphic images of a young mechanic that lost 30% of the tissue on one arm due to microbial contamination in gasoline.

    My advice for what it's worth, you can't avoid bio-fuels. If they say it isn't there, they are lying to you and smiling because they think you are a fool.

    Use high-turnover stations as much as you can. Always use PPE, that includes safety eye wear, when servicing any fuel system.

    If you think Premium fuels don't have a certain amount of bio-fuel, gasoline or diesel, in my opinion, you are gambling.
    1997 R1100RT (Restored Basket Case) , 1981 KZ 440 LTD (Restored Basket Case)
    1986 K75S(the beutch), 1993 K1100RS (blown engine), 1997 Chev Short Box (4x4 with an LT1)
    "You can easily judge the character of a man by how he treats those who can do nothing for him."

  8. #23
    . AntonLargiader's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA
    Posts
    1,367
    Maybe we need to return to the pumps where you can see the fuel through a glass column.
    Anton Largiader 72724
    largiader.com bmwra.org

  9. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Lansing, Kansas
    Posts
    224
    Quote Originally Posted by dieselyoda View Post
    ... If you think Premium fuels don't have a certain amount of bio-fuel, gasoline or diesel, in my opinion, you are gambling.
    I agree, but I have no scientific basis for my opinion. I simply do not trust most absolute statements, whomever they come from. When anyone from any governmental agency (federal, state or local) tells me something is definitely true (or false) I ignore them. Especially for ethanol in gasoline--no matter what it says on the pump, I assume there is some ethanol in the product.
    Royce
    On the coast of Kansas
    2012 F800ST

  10. #25
    Watch This!!! junkjohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Dennis, MA
    Posts
    3,207
    Quote Originally Posted by AntonLargiader View Post
    Maybe we need to return to the pumps where you can see the fuel through a glass column.
    We need to return to the TIME when you could see the fuel through a glass column.I just love those visible pumps.
    John Simonds
    2008 R 1200 GSA
    1975 850 Norton Roadster
    If it ain"t broke... fix it till it is.

  11. #26
    Registered User arthurdent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Central Nebraska
    Posts
    324
    Quote Originally Posted by royce View Post
    I agree, but I have no scientific basis for my opinion. I simply do not trust most absolute statements, whomever they come from. When anyone from any governmental agency (federal, state or local) tells me something is definitely true (or false) I ignore them. Especially for ethanol in gasoline--no matter what it says on the pump, I assume there is some ethanol in the product.
    Here's a link to a science article about what happens when biofuels contaminate something that should NEVER have biofuel in it. In short, the entire fuel delivery system is contaminated so Royce is absolutely right.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •