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Thread: Bead Breaker

  1. #16
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    What is this center-stand-bead-breaker technique? Anyone care to share it with a newbie?
    1983 R100RS
    2004 R1150RT
    BMW MOA 181289
    ABC 13558

  2. #17
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
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    Some use the side stand and the weight of the bike to push the bead off. Hard to do with your own bike without one wheel on it, works best with a buddies bike if you are not solo.

    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2009 F800GS
    I can't wait to retire and have a fixed income. The one I have now is always broke.

  3. #18
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    Thanks!
    1983 R100RS
    2004 R1150RT
    BMW MOA 181289
    ABC 13558

  4. #19
    Proud Veteran SteveAikens's Avatar
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    There's also the center stand method that was mostly figured out when BMW changed the side stands to a flimsy, thin rod with a foot on it, that automatically retracted when the weight was lifted off the stand. That was something like 1970 or so with the R75.

    Basically similar to what is shown using the side stand, tie the center stand to something forward of the pivot point - most used the header crossover back then for the front, the front wheel as shown if it was the back. Once tied off, you rock the bike toward you until you cleared the tire, pull the tire under one of the legs of the stand and then pressed the bikes weight into the tire at the bead. It was a lot of work and sucked to do it but when you need to break a bead on a flat, there wasn't a lot of choice. Once broken, you just used to short tire spoons that came in the tool kit with the bike to get the tube out - and if you were smart, you replaced it with the spare tube you carried.
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    Steve Aikens, Clovis, NM
    BMW MOA #6218
    IBA# 442

  5. #20
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    Do you mean use one leg of the center stand on the tire near the bead? So that the bike was balanced on the non-flat tire and one leg of the center stand? Wouldn't you have to lean the bike waayy over to get the tire under the leg? That would definitely be a challenge but as you say...if you really, really need to break a bead...necessity is a mother...
    1983 R100RS
    2004 R1150RT
    BMW MOA 181289
    ABC 13558

  6. #21
    Proud Veteran SteveAikens's Avatar
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    Afraid so. Like I said, I know it's been done single-handedly. In my Cross days - I actually came on a CR 400 Husky rider [almost exactly like mine] that just finishing up replacing a rear tube on his bike, that did exactly that.

    For those that aren't aware, the CR 400 has tire/rim support locks bolted through the rims to make sure the tires don't slip or roll off when they go flat. Once they've been on the rim a while - those tire beads are on there to stay - even without the tire locks being bolted on.

    For me, had I not had help, I never would have been able to make it work.
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    Steve Aikens, Clovis, NM
    BMW MOA #6218
    IBA# 442

  7. #22
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
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    I had a chance to give the Motion Pro breaker set a test removing the Heidenau K60s from my F800GS wheels last week. The very stiff sidewall rear was a bit of work to get broke loose, but I was able to get it done with just the breaker set. I had to work around a short distance of the bead, going back and forth over it to get it to finally let loose. I also applied a bit of lube along the bead as I worked it down to aid in the process. The front tire was much less work to get done, I would expect most street tires with a softer carcass would also be easier to break loose.

    I also tried using them as levers to remove the tires. They did not work as well for this function, so I,I'll be sticking with the levers I currently carry. The bead breaker is a keeper though for it's primary function, at least as a roadside tool. I won't be using them routinely to change tires at home, my tire changer works much easier there.

    At the end of the job, the breaker set showed no sign of damage or failure other than some marks in the finish where they lever against each other. I had to apply significant force to the rear tire to break the bead on it, and the levers withstood that without bending.

    I give these tools a passing grade for use in roadside repairs. I think there are better options for the shop where size and weight for portability aren't requirements.
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2009 F800GS
    I can't wait to retire and have a fixed income. The one I have now is always broke.

  8. #23
    Bill Lumberg 175781's Avatar
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    I'm considering an ATL-to-San Antonio trip and back. First trip that I couldn't complete in one 12 hour day. Filing all this info away for good measure.
    R75/6, 2004 R1150RTA.

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