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Thread: Corn lobby's response to all our ethanol threads

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by franko View Post
    Good Morning Ellengtrgrl: You are in the "five county area" with the extra special blend. In Jefferson County I can buy Non-ethanol gas at Kwik Trip and Citgo stations. I look for pumps with a hose for each type, not a single hose per pump. Other brands may have it too. It is usually about 40 cents more per gallon than the regular price. If you plan to take a trip to the area, hwy 36 to Waterford, hwy 83 out of town to Mukwonago. Follow ES to county J, by the Elegant Farmer, Heading west on J will take you to county N in the town of Troy (being west of East Troy). Turn right on N, Bluff rd. will branch off to the left. This is a good BIMBLE road. Be careful because the curves are deceptive at the start of it, this will take you to Whitewater through the Kettle Moraine Forest and farmland. If you head up to Fort Atkinson, the Citgo station on the east side (single hose) has the gas as well as Kwik trip on the northwest side (dedicated hose- recreational fuel). State 106 east out of Fort to state 59 or 59 out of Whitewater (there is a Citgo station as you get in to Witewater, but I've not stopped there for awhile, so I don't know the pump grades) For your return trip, take 67 north out of Eagle and cut into the Forest. Look for Waterville rd (another good bimble road). It starts a little northeast of Eagle, works it's way through the forest and ends up at I94 on the east side of upper and lower Nemahbin Lake. About a mile west is the on ramp for the freeway, so you can do a quick ride back to Metro Milwaukee. You might want to look the route up on the maps as it's not totally connected as I described it, but does make a nice ride to try the non-ethanol gas. frank
    Cool! Thanks for the info Frank! I've been wondering what are some good riding roads around here, and it's nice to know that I don't have to go all the way to Jefferson County for non-ethanol gas. BTW, my home county of Manitowoc (where I lived [with the exception of a few years in the 80s, when I was attending the Univ. of Wisconsin in Madison] until 2004), also seems to have had nothing but E10 (since at least the early 2000s) and Flex fuel gas. That's kind of odd considering that my hometown of Manitowoc only has a bit more than 32,000 people.
    Last edited by ellengtrgrl; 09-23-2013 at 02:26 PM.

  2. #62
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    My apology for interrupting this "corn fight". As we have some well educated, technical minds involved, here's my question: (I'll preface by saying that I tried for my own answer & found none.)
    With various octanes sold,i.e., 85-87-89-91-93, I would like to know how the % of ethanol varies,if any, as the octane level changes?
    "If I had my life to live over, I'd dare to make more mistakes next time...I'd relax,I'd limber up... I would take fewer things seriously...take more chances... take more trips...climb more mountains...swim more rivers...eat more ice cream." Jorge Luis Borges at age 85.

  3. #63
    Registered User wbrownell9's Avatar
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    franko, 8ninety8 - misinterpreted the proposal, I thought you were saying E10 for everybody but bikes (& trikes). You make a good case. I'd love to see E0 gas locally available. As it turns out, the nearest available is 35 miles away according to pure-gas.org, so it's 1/4 tank on my RT to get it - not worthwhile.

    I don't suppose anybody wants to start debating whether ethanol is actually energy-positive after considering the petroleum used to grow, fertilize, transport, ferment, blend & monitor?

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
    My apology for interrupting this "corn fight". As we have some well educated, technical minds involved, here's my question: (I'll preface by saying that I tried for my own answer & found none.)
    With various octanes sold,i.e., 85-87-89-91-93, I would like to know how the % of ethanol varies,if any, as the octane level changes?
    I think it is the same percentage across the board. At least that's what it seems to be here in Ohio. There may be some confusion due to the fact that in some places, premium fuels do not have any ethanol mixed in.

  5. #65
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    Saw the OP's video on the Telly the other evening. So it's been released into the air waves. Face it, there is a corn lobby, it's got a lot moola, it wants to keep prices up there. ethanol is likely the single product that brought corn prices into an area our parent and grandparent farmers could never have imagined.

    thirty years ago a cheap commodity, corn, seemed like a magic bullet for a product that might solve a problem not affecting every part of the country or every type of vehicle in the same way. Now aldehydes aside, law has been piled on laws, likely lawn mowers are next. I for one am still waiting for all the particulars to be analyzed as to the wisdom of using such a product.

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8ninety8 View Post
    I for one am still waiting for all the particulars to be analyzed as to the wisdom of using such a product.
    At the risk of sounding pessimistic, I'd say you're probably going to be waiting a while!

    Ride Safe,
    Steve R.

    PS: No one will be more pleased than I if I'm proven wrong!
    2013 R1200RT

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