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Thread: SPEED KILLS (Your Pocketbook)

  1. #16
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDOCKERY132445 View Post
    Speed does not kill, stupidity does. I loved the reference to the German approach. That makes sense.

    Of course police love speeding laws because they have nice equipment to effectively prove that a "crime" was committed.

    The Parker study should be force fed every police jurisdiction. They actually believe that crap; some even keep up the mantra after they retire.

    Why do the police ignore dangerous behaviors like testing, putting on makeup, eating food, disciplinign children, etc. and concentrate on speeding? Because it is easy. AND lucrative.
    The German model does work. Go however fast you want, on some sections of the Autobahn, as long as you pay the $8/gal price for fuel. Per mile traveled, the cost increases with the speed...........producing more tax revenue per mile traveled.

    Oh, and by the way, get the heck out of the way of the guy that has more money than you..... I've driven too long in the USA to believe that the typical American driver will ever yield to the guy in the fancier, more powerful vehicle overtaking them.
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  2. #17
    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDOCKERY132445 View Post
    Speed does not kill, stupidity does. I loved the reference to the German approach. That makes sense.

    Of course police love speeding laws because they have nice equipment to effectively prove that a "crime" was committed.

    The Parker study should be force fed every police jurisdiction. They actually believe that crap; some even keep up the mantra after they retire.

    Why do the police ignore dangerous behaviors like testing, putting on makeup, eating food, disciplinign children, etc. and concentrate on speeding? Because it is easy. AND lucrative.
    Ouch!

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  3. #18
    It is what it is. Bud's Avatar
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    I've found it interesting that because of the differences in math, different countries find speed limits safe for the same type of roads with the same amount of traffic.

    For instance, in the USA we wouldn't have the speed limit at 62.5 MPH but in Canada 100 KPH is considered very, very fast. At least I assume that is true based on how few roads have a 100 KPH speed limit.

    And I'm sure, from a Canadian POV, it is just as strange when they visit the US.

    I have deserved every speeding ticket I have received. And Nancy points out I deserved many, many more.

    I enjoy riding in Western states as generally the speed limits are higher, the traffic less and the roads in as good as or in better shape than those in Illinois.

    When on a road trip to get somewhere, like the Rally in Redmond, it is nice to be able to ride 80 MPH for hours on end w/o constantly looking in the rear view mirror.

    As riders, we have to assume responsibility for our riding and also for being constantly aware of others around us. Yes distracted/texting drivers are a menace to everyone so what can we do? Ride like everyone else is intentionally trying to kill us.

    And what's the deal with RT's being most happy at 75 MPH. At least my '99 seems to run best there.

    Your Mileage Will Vary

    PS. I remember a conversation on this forum where a LEO, now retired, said don't ask me for a break when I stop you, if you weren't already 10 over I wouldn't have stopped you.
    I used to post here, but now I don't.

  4. #19
    Lost again Texpaul's Avatar
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    First off I would like to say that some very good info has been brought up in this discussion and I am learning much from it.

    Having driven in Europe, car and bike, only strengthened a set of beliefs I had held for along time. Basically that speed is only one part of a complicated equation that comprises safety.

    In most of Central Europe they generally try to build quality roads. They have, and enforce, laws to make sure the vehicles that travel those roadways are safe and they try to train people to be competent drivers. As a result they don't depend solely on speed restrictions to create a safe driving environment. I know there are exceptions to this but the point is they don't generally use a single method approach to safety.

    In the US, especially in Texas, we build cheap crap roadways, let any piece of junk that rolls travel on them and have a licencing system that a chimpanzee could pass. Then we expect a handful of people to keep us safe buy enforcing laws that are designed more to raise revenue than promote public safety. At the end of the day we, police and public, are all just victims of bad governance.
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  5. #20
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texpaul View Post
    In the US, especially in Texas, we build cheap crap roadways, let any piece of junk that rolls travel on them and have a licencing system that a chimpanzee could pass. Then we expect a handful of people to keep us safe buy enforcing laws that are designed more to raise revenue than promote public safety. At the end of the day we, police and public, are all just victims of bad governance.
    We have met the enemy..........and he is us
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  6. #21
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    How to fix it

    It has to come from the top. Leadership/government has to fix it. I the. Driver, voter cannot. A lot of people think we can fix every problem in America by just voting the right people in, but it hasn't worked so far, don't expect it to work anytime soon. In the last year I've recently had my eyes opened to some fairly serious schanaginas local law enforcement is pulling and it's disappointing. I don't think we can fix this sort of thing unless police use a different approach. It seems like I remember watching a show on law enforcement in a troubled area, Bronx maybe, where the police did a full 180 with their approach and turned the whole city around. It took some retraining on their part, but when they saw results, they realized its all about the results and not how you get there.
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    Agree, completely. Unlike 'most' politicians, i think it does matter who you vote in as your local sheriff.

    Here in Ft Collins, Colorado (Larimer County) we have a Sheriff who actually uses common sense. For example, our new State laws regarding gun registration and magazine limits is now under heavy scrutiny, not only by him filing law suits and refusing to enforce the new law, but also by other county Sheriff's in the State, mostly those north of Denver.

    At every opportunity, each of us should do whatever we can to protect and take back our freedoms. There are folks in Washington DC and primary in California who would like to see your BMW limited to a 1:15 ratio of horsepower to weight (lbs dry weight). Just think of it, a new 2014 R1200RT with a whopping 38 hp. Where do I sign up?

    Freedom is like credibility. Once you lose it, it is very difficult to get it back.


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  8. #23
    Registered User RINTY's Avatar
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    I think this video could go viral; it has already been picked up on another board that I frequent. It's obviously a position piece, but it's well done.

    We spent several miserable hours on the B.C. section of the Trans Canada Highway yesterday, coming back from Nakusp. We thought we would avoid summer traffic this weekend but, no joy.
    Rinty

    "When you don't know where you're going, any road will get you there."

  9. #24
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    Excellent video. Hopefully it'll convince a majority of lawmakers to up the speeds like Texas recently has.

    Here's my fix. Increase all highway, byway, back roads and freeway maximum speeds to a speed faster than the fastest car (and motorcycle) can achieve. No more speeding.


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  10. #25
    Cowboyatheart
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    Quote Originally Posted by sibud View Post
    I've found it interesting that because of the differences in math, different countries find speed limits safe for the same type of roads with the same amount of traffic.

    For instance, in the USA we wouldn't have the speed limit at 62.5 MPH but in Canada 100 KPH is considered very, very fast. At least I assume that is true based on how few roads have a 100 KPH speed limit.

    And I'm sure, from a Canadian POV, it is just as strange when they visit the US.

    I disagree, many Canadians will go YAHOO, a speed limit where we can be relaxed, focus on driving and not constantly looking for the hiding cop out to get you.
    And if the limits seem a little too fast for some's tastes, they will go slower in the right lane and let others pass. What a concept!

    hmmmmm, wait a minute, that is written in most rules, and taught in driver's training, oh ya, people ignore it and never get ticketed for it. Right, easy money giving out speeding tickets.

  11. #26
    Registered User amiles's Avatar
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    It strikes me that all too many speed limits are posted based on a (one size fits all) set of formulas. Every time I exit an expressway on an unfamiliar ramp I wonder what the "correct" speed is. I know that sometimes 25 mph is seriously the safe speed, but how often do we see ramps posted at 25 when 35 or more would be safe? We motorcyclists have sufficient acceleration capability to drop to an unnecessarily low speed & then accelerate to a proper merging speed. Trucks etc that accelerate slower end up with an excessively long merge that effects the rhythm & tempo of the traffic flow. Politics and luck work against us as well. Hereabouts over the years we have had a situation or two where several nasty accidents take place within a short period of time at almost the same spot, public outcry to add traffic signals or reduce speed soon follow. The fact that few accidents have ever taken place in that spot before makes no difference.
    I'll bet that some of the best income producing stretches of road have a posted speed lower that most of us perceive and know to be proper.

  12. #27
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmwmotorwerkz View Post
    Freedom is like credibility. Once you lose it, it is very difficult to get it back.
    Considering that construction of public roads isn't mentioned in the original constitution, how can you claim you have a freedom to travel on them any speed you deem appropriate?

    "Public roads" (beyond city streets) didn't really appear until after the War of 1812 when the federal gov't finally realized that inland trade was effectively strangled by the lack of roads (i.e., infrastructure). However, with the arrival of train technology in the 1840's, the next 70 years were dominated by the rail barons that controlled most all transcontinental transport and "public road" construction was pretty much ignored by the federal and state governments. US public road construction didn't really occur until the Great Depression with the expansion of federal highway system as public works programs. Then, in the 1950's, Eisenhower passed the Interstate Highway Program as a Cold War defense program to aid rapid mobilization, based on Mussolini's Autostrade and Hitler's Autobahn.

    Laying claim to a right and paraphrasing a few selected lines from the Constitution is a surefire path to end-up on the wrong side of the law and your neighbors.

    If no speed limits are a good thing, why did the state of Montana reinstate theirs?
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  13. #28
    Rally Rat
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    I find that, here in the States, most highway speed limits are fair, but I agree that speed fines are not a means to prevent road accidents.

    Since signage cannot be changed quickly to reflect current weather or road conditions, the limits must be calculated to lean towards worst case scenarios to keep most drivers safe. The quality and experience level of drivers on any one road at any time covers a wide range so the posted limit must account for that.

    I see two possible solutions that could make everyone happier in the future:

    1. Speed limit signs that automatically update to reflect current conditons. These exist on I-5 near Seattle now and work well.
    2. Separated express lanes with unlimited speed limits and increased liability in the event of an accident.


    I personally would be a safer rider if I didn't need to spend time looking at my speedometer.

  14. #29
    TravelsWithBarley.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post

    If no speed limits are a good thing, why did the state of Montana reinstate theirs?
    Didn't the feds threaten to withhold highway funds if they didn't reimpose speed limits? I think Montana caved at the thought of losing several million $$$. Not sure of my facts, but pretty certain I read that somewhere a few years ago.
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    Interstates are 75 in Montana, just like Colorado.


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