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Thread: Gotta love ethanol free gas

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bruche View Post
    The small engine repair person that fixes my lawn mower tells me fuel problems associated with ethanol problems is epidemic. .
    Do you know how many people who have seasonal gas-engine powered equipment use fuel stabilizer? Probably one out of ten. The only thing most people in my neighborhood do is run the tank and engine dry before they put the unit out of service. One of the worst things you can do. No wonder problems are epidemic.

  2. #17
    Kitsap County Rounder cwsenn's Avatar
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    I usually buy gas at Chevron with the Techron 3 additive or Costco which also adds a cleaning agent similar to what Chevron uses and I most definetly do use fuel stabilier over the winter which includes adding it to the gas and running the engine to ensure the fuel stabilizer is ran into the fuel lines. Never had a problem with any of my vehicles or small gas engines which last year totaled 15 different gas engines, I am working on reducing that number.
    As for the mileage check, the only way any of you can truly test your mileage is to drive the same route with the ethanol free gas as you do with the ethanol added gas on the same route. It's hardly accurate to say while driving in a different state you used ethanol free gas. I have tested it on the same stretch of roadway in my truck, car and motorcycle and it just does not make much, if any difference on the MPG.

    I have seen many gummed up carbs from small engines which mainly come from any type of fuel stored for too long without the use of fuel stabilizers.
    Chuck Senn
    2006 R1200RT (Red)

  3. #18
    rangerreece rangerreece's Avatar
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    Same route

    I've been carefully monitoring MPG on my R1200RT since 2008. Exact same riding patterns and road to and from work mileage goes from 49mpg with ethanol to 52 without. I carefully establish a variable free or as much of a variable free equation as possible. I've been able to track MPG so carefully now that I can tell when a gas station claiming ethanol free sells me ethanol the difference is that dramatic. I only run 93 octane in the bike. I have noticed that the difference in MPG on the BMW 328i is not as noticeable but still there. My opinion ethanol is a corn lobby solution that benifits everyone but the consumer. Free market society is not a free market when all the choices but one are removed.
    2005 R1200RT
    BMWMOA # 143779
    "Positive Habit Transfer is no substitute for Situational Awareness."

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by EMSimon View Post
    The only thing most people in my neighborhood do is run the tank and engine dry before they put the unit out of service. One of the worst things you can do. No wonder problems are epidemic.
    Out of curiosity, why? We had an old Lawnboy mower that lasted for over 18 years. The only maintenance it required was a new spark plug and cutting blade when needed. We probably replaced the starter pull rope a few times too. It had a fuel valve under the tank and we never killed it by turning off the ignition. We'd close the fuel valve and let the engine run the carburetor dry. It only took about a minute so was no big deal. The main reason we did this was because the engine was a 2-stroke, requiring a fuel/oil mix and getting into that habit precluded the possibility of the engine sitting through the winter season with that oil mix evaporating in the float bowl but we never had any problems with it doing that, regardless of how long it sat before the next start up. We retired it when it started getting harder to start and besides, the mowing deck was seriously starting to deteriorate by then too.

    Just wondering!

    Ride Safe,
    Steve R.
    2013 R1200RT

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by srhodes13 View Post
    Out of curiosity, why? We had an old Lawnboy mower that lasted for over 18 years. The only maintenance it required was a new spark plug and cutting blade when needed. We probably replaced the starter pull rope a few times too. It had a fuel valve under the tank and we never killed it by turning off the ignition. We'd close the fuel valve and let the engine run the carburetor dry. It only took about a minute so was no big deal. The main reason we did this was because the engine was a 2-stroke, requiring a fuel/oil mix and getting into that habit precluded the possibility of the engine sitting through the winter season with that oil mix evaporating in the float bowl but we never had any problems with it doing that, regardless of how long it sat before the next start up. We retired it when it started getting harder to start and besides, the mowing deck was seriously starting to deteriorate by then too.

    Just wondering!

    Ride Safe,
    Steve R.
    Because they are being told or have read somewhere that fuel goes bad after a while. So, they follow the instructions of some other halfwit to get rid of all the gas before they store the unit and run it dry (so they think).
    You are speaking in past tense about your Lawnboy, which makes me believe this all happened before we had ethanol in gas.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by EMSimon View Post
    Because they are being told or have read somewhere that fuel goes bad after a while. So, they follow the instructions of some other halfwit to get rid of all the gas before they store the unit and run it dry (so they think).
    You are speaking in past tense about your Lawnboy, which makes me believe this all happened before we had ethanol in gas.
    It has been a while since we had the Lawnboy. It's also hard to remember exactly how the timeline runs as far as when, in our ownership experience, that ethanol was introduced to automotive fuels. I imagine the Lawnboy started life without the benefits of alcohol in the gasoline but I'm more than certain that it didn't finish life with that advantage. We were just amazed it lasted as long as it did. We do have a relatively small yard. I can mow and edge in about 50 minutes so it's not like the mower had a tough life all things considered.

    You didn't answer my question though. How does running all the fuel out of the mower before storing it for the winter damage anything? I agree, the fuel will go sour over time unless it's treated but I don't see how storing it dry for one season poses any problems?

    Again, just wondering?

    Ride Safe,
    Steve R.
    2013 R1200RT

  7. #22
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    There has to be an additive to achieve correct anti-knock properties, i.e. octane. You're simply not going to get to premium-level octane without one.

    Ethanol is a good one.

    Lead's illegal.

    Be curious what is used in so-called ethanol-free gasoline these days.
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  8. #23
    Outlander Omega Man's Avatar
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    Ethanol free for small engines-
    This is the ready to go versions for small, in this case, 2-stroke engines. http://www.vp-sef.com/index.php/products/pro-max
    The local Fire Departments have gone to this as it has a much better shelf life without the harmful effects of ethanol.
    I'm mixing my own out of their Racing Fuel Catalog. Higher octane and no ethanol are a couple of key ingredients to making engines I have happy- especially after a winter of much less use.
    OM
    "Well they say.. time loves a hero but only time will tell.. If he's real, he's a legend from heaven If he ain't he was sent here from hell" Lowell George
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  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by srhodes13 View Post
    You didn't answer my question though. How does running all the fuel out of the mower before storing it for the winter damage anything? I agree, the fuel will go sour over time unless it's treated but I don't see how storing it dry for one season poses any problems?

    Again, just wondering?

    Ride Safe,
    Steve R.
    Because you will not be able to run the carb COMPLETELY dry before the engine stops. You will also not be able to empty the tank COMPLETELY before the engine stops. The small residual amount of gas in the carbs gums up the tiny orifices and the small amount of gas in the tank turns to a nasty mass quicker than a full tank. Drying out seals in the carbs makes them prone to harden and become brittle. That's the main reason, I will not drain carbs on my motorcycles when I store them for the winter. This has proven to work on the most critical bikes, the 6-Cylinder CBXes, where one carb feeds the equivalent of a 175cc cylinder.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by EMSimon View Post
    Because you will not be able to run the carb COMPLETELY dry before the engine stops. You will also not be able to empty the tank COMPLETELY before the engine stops. The small residual amount of gas in the carbs gums up the tiny orifices and the small amount of gas in the tank turns to a nasty mass quicker than a full tank. Drying out seals in the carbs makes them prone to harden and become brittle. That's the main reason, I will not drain carbs on my motorcycles when I store them for the winter. This has proven to work on the most critical bikes, the 6-Cylinder CBXes, where one carb feeds the equivalent of a 175cc cylinder.
    Ok, cool, that makes sense. I've never lived anywhere else but the Texas Gulf Coast. We ride twelve months out of the year so winterizing a motorcycle isn't something I've ever had to worry about. As for the lawn mower, probably the longest it ever sat idle was maybe two months? From spring through fall, we generally mow weekly, sometimes twice a week if we get enough rain. That hasn't been a problem this year! Many people do a touch up of the yard every one to two months during the "winter" season. Either way, our lawnmowers don't get much down time so your explanation probably doesn't apply to us around here although it does make sense if the engine is going to sit over double that time. Thanks for the clarification!

    Ride Safe,
    Steve R.
    2013 R1200RT

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