Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Can't cool above 94F

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    319

    Can't cool above 94F

    Within the last 12 months I read a post on MOA describing how it is not possible to evaporatively cool above 94F. I have searched without success. Does anyone remember where it is

  2. #2
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    New York State
    Posts
    623
    I think this is the thread you are looking for:

    http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/showthre...t-to-mesh-quot

    Harry
    2003 R1150RT - Silver

  3. #3
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    13,361
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    319
    Quote Originally Posted by AKsuited View Post
    I think this is the thread you are looking for:

    http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/showthre...t-to-mesh-quot

    Harry
    Yes, this is the article
    Muchas gracias

  5. #5
    Cowboyatheart
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Pender Harbour, B.C.
    Posts
    576
    Cooling evaporatively can work at any temp. The key is the humidity. If not humid, water will evaporate taking heat energy from your body to turn the liquid to gas vapour. If 100% humid there is no more room in the air for more water vapour, it is already saturated. So no evaporative cooling.

    The higher the humidity, the less room for more water vapour, the less evaporative cooling
    you will experience.
    Neil
    Want to be happy for a day? Drink. Want to be happy for a year? Get married. Want to be happy for life? Ride a BMW!
    www.TasteMoringa.com Smart Mix & XM3 Energy Drink are the puppies to view...IMO

  6. #6
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    New York State
    Posts
    623
    Quote Originally Posted by cowboyatheart View Post
    Cooling evaporatively can work at any temp. The key is the humidity. If not humid, water will evaporate taking heat energy from your body to turn the liquid to gas vapour. If 100% humid there is no more room in the air for more water vapour, it is already saturated. So no evaporative cooling.

    The higher the humidity, the less room for more water vapour, the less evaporative cooling
    you will experience.
    Similarly, the lower the humidity, the greater the danger of dehydration. That's why some get by with mesh gear in humid climates, while others in the arid west warn against wearing mesh gear.

    Harry
    2003 R1150RT - Silver

  7. #7
    Left Coast Rider
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Vancouver Canada
    Posts
    1,129
    After leaving Salem this year, I ran through some 112F heat. I was wearing mesh gear and drinking frequently from a camelback. All things considered, I felt pretty good. Met a fellow who was wearing an evaporative vest. His face was as red as a radish and he wasn't feeling good too well. I suggested he drink some water, right now. He told me how well his vest was working. I wasn't listening and again suggested he drink some water - which he did. He started feeling better almost immediately.

    I would suggest that hi-tech stuff is good WHEN USED IN COMBINATION with accepted methods of hydration.

  8. #8
    Ponch ponch1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Fountain Hills AZ
    Posts
    906
    Water is more than hydration, but aids in keeping one cool. I will say though that extreme heat will do one in regardless of hydration as the body can't rid itself of the heat fast enough and if core temps get high enough, bodily functions shutdown. 94 degrees isn't all that hot. I've ridden in 119 and that was hot. I wouldn't want to do it more than an hour though.
    My Motorrad
    BMWMOA 162849 | BMWRA 41335 | VROC 8109-R | VBA 19

  9. #9
    Norm Norms 427's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Spokane, WA
    Posts
    131
    When really hot outside I get up at 3 AM and ride in the cool of the AM. When temps hit 90 I get a motel w a swimming pool ... works better than any hydration vest!
    Now: '12 R1200RT Midnight Blue Metallic / '11 Ural Patrol 2WD ridden to Alaska / '09 KLR 650 / '05 HD Heritage Softail / '08 Harley Sportster 1200C / '85 Yamaha VMax bought new. I wasn't ready to say goodbye: www.shaunlunt.typepad.com

  10. #10
    Enjoy The Ride saddleman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Huntersville N.C.
    Posts
    324
    Everybody has different experiences riding in hot weather. I'm one of the lucky ones that the heat doesn't seem to bother me at all. Whenever I ride long distances I always wear extra gear. My first layer is Simpson Carbon X long underwear. Carbon X is moisture wicking & heat resistant so if you go sliding down a highway you won't get friction burns. 2nd layer is thick jeans & another wicking t-shirt. 3rd upper layer is a 26 to 78 layer kevlar impact vest. 4th upper layer is a regular t-shirt. Then I put my Olympia mesh jacket & pants on followed by my Olympia neon orange vest. I use a LD Comfort head sock & my Shoei Neotec Helmet. My summer gloves are mesh. My boots are Alpinestar Gore-Tex.

    I work in the racing industry so my time off during the summer is very limited. When I do travel in the summer I usually do 800 to 1000 mile plus days just to get to my destination. I've had several days were the temps exceeded 100 degrees for over 500 miles. A typical 800 mile day for me would be 3 fuel stops never getting off the bike & drinking one 20 oz bottle of water or less regardless of the temperatures. A 1000 mile plus day would be 4 fuel stops with 1 food & restroom break not to exceed 15 minutes.

    The best way I know to check for dehydration is to press your thumb on the flat bone halfway between your knee & ankle for 10 seconds. After 10 seconds run your index finger up & down the flat bone to feel the dent your thumb left. The larger the dent the more you are dehydrated. Again everyone is different & a lot depends on how good you are physically fit.
    Dave
    2004 Black LT
    2000 Canyon Red LT
    The Only Vehicles I Own

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Wilmington, NC
    Posts
    2,127
    The OP is confused and needs to digest the tech article on this subject at the IBA website.

    93-94 is the temp at which your body will gain heat from air even though your body nominal temp is a few degrees higher. Your body generates the equivalent of about 100W of heat energy and as one gets to 93-94 temp, your loss of body-generated heat slows a lot because there is no temp differential to drive it- which is why sweating also increases. Above 93-94, eat is gained from hot air moving over the body and has to be offset by some means. Could be slowing direct hot air contact with skin or deliberately cooling the skin or both. The higher the air temp above body temp or longer the ride, the more likely that actual cooling may be needed rather than just protection.

    Evap cooling works at any temp where humidity is low enough, for example in the SW. Its rarely of much use in the humid SE.

    I live in the SE which is why I use a veskimo instead of evap cooling for long rides on hot humid days. Though I sometimes add a soaked neck wrap anyway for what little it does At least it prevents hot air from assaulting my neck region.

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Lansing, Kansas
    Posts
    257

    To All Y'all Posters

    Good discussion. Thx to all of you for the info. I've never experienced much heat discomfort while riding--including in the desert SW in the summer--but this discussion answers a lot of questions for me about how and why. Seems I've been doing all the right things ... but mainly through luck and/or common sense.
    Royce
    On the coast of Kansas
    2012 F800ST

  13. #13
    Registered User peterbonly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    38

    comfort in hot weather

    www.ldcomfort.com has a great variety of products to do what it sounds you are interested in.
    Long story short, my throttle pulley mechanism broke in the middle of 108F heat in UT and before it was all over I needed to ride to LA - as in left-coast. LDComfort literally saved my life - long johns, long sleeve top, and helmet liner - all well wetted down and sealed in my BMW riding gear. NO MESH. And, foreign to most, my skin was dry and cool! Read the information at LDComfort carefully.

    The LDComfort and the full procedure, followed correctly, will keep you cool for hours. No ties or connection to the company.
    -pp Long Distance Motorcycle Adventurer
    '00 GS w/ >165K miles; '07 RT w/ >140K miles

    LD blog: www.ppldma.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •