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Thread: R75/5 Handlebar Switch Parts

  1. #1
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    R75/5 Handlebar Switch Parts

    Hi all,

    So I took apart my r75/5 handlebar switches today in order to clean them up and inspect them. For the most part everything cleaned up nice and well, with the exception of one part.

    The right handlebar's contact plate (removable) has worn down on one of the contacts so far that there is now a hole in it.


    See images below:


    contact_plate1.jpgcontact_plate2.jpg



    Would I be able to solder this or have any sort of way of repairing this for a lasting switch? Or is it best to just try to look for a junk switch to replace my contact plate with?

  2. #2
    Registered User m_stock10506's Avatar
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    On the right side? Isn't that controlling the turn signals? Were you having a problem with them? The hole might be on the "OFF" setting.

    I had a similar problem with my 1974 left side switch, where the low beam would not light up on the detent but would light if the switch was moved a little off of the detent. In that case I was able to add little layer of solder to that piece you have there and it has been working well for several years now.
    Michael Stock, Trinity, NC
    R1100RT, R100, R60/6

  3. #3
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    Good to know! Ill give it a shot this week!



    On a side note, has anyone had any luck using 303 aerospace protectant on bakelite plastic?

    Was also trying to restore the look of the original switches. But after using 303 aerospace protectant, it seems to leave the switches looking "chalky". I can buff this chalkyness off but doesnt seem to make the switches look any more back to original sheen.

  4. #4
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    No one can help?

    Is there no way to restore these switches plastic?



    Is there any more permanent solution than soldering (solder is generally a pretty soft material and thus would wear much faster than a new piece)?

  5. #5
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    Check with the used or salvage parts places...maybe you can pull parts out of an old unit and create a good working one.
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  6. #6
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    Switches

    My right handlebar switch, starter etc. went south. There was some kind of a short in it that drained the battery even with the key off. don't ask me how. Anyway I fooled around with the thing and you know what happens to that spring when you take the little retainer off the bottom of the switch shaft. Solution? There is a German firm (Altetiele or something like that) that sells the reproductions on Ebay and they're not cheap. I had to cave in and buy one because I just couldn't fix the old one. However, a light spray of flat Black Rustoleum made it look new. You can put that protectant on but in 3 days they look grey again.

  7. #7
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    Is there any more permanent solution than soldering (solder is generally a pretty soft material and thus would wear much faster than a new piece)?
    I don't recall off hand what interfaces with the back side of that contact plate. If there is room you could clean up the recess a bit and solder a BB into the hole. Being steel it would wear better than solder (although it might wear the mating plate down too) and the spherical surface of BB would duplicate the original dimple.
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  8. #8
    . AntonLargiader's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 20774 View Post
    Check with the used or salvage parts places...maybe you can pull parts out of an old unit and create a good working one.
    He already has a used switch.

    BMW sells that switch, brand new, for about $90. Yeah, it's not cheap, but it's NEW. Good for another 40 years. No monkeying around with parts that aren't quite worn out yet.
    Anton Largiader 72724
    largiader.com bmwra.org

  9. #9
    James.A
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    You have nothing to lose trying to solder that hole and dress it out. I'd do that on one one of my bikes. In fact, I have done that on my bikes.

    Of course, a new switch would be best. I buy new after I wreck old ones trying to save them. My success rate is around 50%.

    Those switches are totally repairable, but the internal parts are tiny and easily ruined or lost. I know this for a fact.

    Like I said before, you have nothing to lose.

    If you decide to get a new one, keep the old one to scavenge parts from another time. I probably have 1 or 2 of those myself.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by James.A View Post
    You have nothing to lose trying to solder that hole and dress it out. I'd do that on one one of my bikes. In fact, I have done that on my bikes.

    Of course, a new switch would be best. I buy new after I wreck old ones trying to save them. My success rate is around 50%.

    Those switches are totally repairable, but the internal parts are tiny and easily ruined or lost. I know this for a fact.

    Like I said before, you have nothing to lose.

    If you decide to get a new one, keep the old one to scavenge parts from another time. I probably have 1 or 2 of those myself.


    Problem is if I go to replace one, I have to replace both! haha! I'm incredibly particular and cant have one looking new while the other still looks old and dated! Haha!


    How are the quality of the newer switches? Are they still made as well as the originals?

    I've gotten a few parts from bmwhucky (hans lowe) and been a bit saddened by their quality. Specifically the tele-tele signal for the headlight housing and the finish of the air tubes. (Had some excess plastic at the seams and rough edges)

  11. #11
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    I've gotten a few parts from bmwhucky (hans lowe) and been a bit saddened by their quality.
    Well, Hans can't really be blamed for the "quality" of the components he sells; he sells what he can get his hans on (pun).

    Just be aware that anything he sells with the remotest connection to the word "electrical" is NOT RETURNABLE.
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  12. #12
    Monza Blue 1974 R90/6
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    With regards to the "look" of the plastic, I use 303 on my black plastic and rubber bits two or maybe three times over the course of a season (whether they need it or not!). Wasn't sure what you meant by "chalkiness" so took a look at my switches as I got ready to ride this morning. Little bit of grey in the curvy bit. Not something I would say looks bad though. Maybe a couple of doses over time will clean them up?

    I definitely vote for the 303 though. Lots longer staying power than Armor All on the plastic and rubber.

    Barron

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    Quote Originally Posted by barron_williams View Post
    With regards to the "look" of the plastic, I use 303 on my black plastic and rubber bits two or maybe three times over the course of a season (whether they need it or not!). Wasn't sure what you meant by "chalkiness" so took a look at my switches as I got ready to ride this morning. Little bit of grey in the curvy bit. Not something I would say looks bad though. Maybe a couple of doses over time will clean them up?

    I definitely vote for the 303 though. Lots longer staying power than Armor All on the plastic and rubber.

    Barron
    Hey Barron,

    Actually I soaked my switches in 303 for a good 7 hours. When I took them out and wiped down/dried them off they turned a chalky white (faded plastic look). Before that they were far less faded lookin

  14. #14
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    Check out a product called wipe new, might work well for this

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