Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Reynolds Stand Part Numbers

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Phoenix
    Posts
    22

    Reynolds Stand Part Numbers

    I just picked up a very clean almost all original 1982 R100rs with 26,000 original miles.
    I also have a 1985 K100rs.
    I have years of previous experience with another K100rs, also 1985 and a previously owned 1981 R100rs.
    I felt very fortunate to have found this beautiful R100rs. It does have some mods, but nothing major. It has progressive front springs & Koni rears. Also has a Brown side stand.
    It has been many years since I had my first R100rs....but I don't remember that it was THIS difficult to operate the center stand. It is a HUGE heft to get it up and almost impossible to over center it to get it down. Obviously, I can weld up the stops to make it stay closer to the over center point when up.
    I understand that this is a common complaint on this model.
    I'm intending on replacing it with a Reynolds ride off stand although I won't be riding off it.
    I have searched and searched trying to find a list of original part numbers for the Reynolds stand. I currently have a bid in at Ebay for one listed as 81-84. It's a 328. In searching the flea market here, I find a member is advertising a 338 for this application.
    Can anyone here tell me which is correct????
    Thanks, Regards, Ibjman

  2. #2
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    12,429
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  3. #3
    Day Dreaming ... happy wanderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    1,816
    Quote Originally Posted by 20774 View Post
    Hmmm. My '82 RS is nigh impossible to center stand alone. It's a lesson in how to injure the top of your hand and more. Totally impossible with luggage loaded and on.

    I wonder what "* See the special note on page 8" says about that stand?
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
    '81 R80G/S, '82 R100RS, '00 R1100RT

  4. #4
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Pismo Beach, CA
    Posts
    2,923
    Let's see...




    I guess one thing you're going to need to know is the P/N of the stand when you find one. Is the number stamped into the part somewhere
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  5. #5
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    12,429
    If you go to that website and back up the URL by deleting the last portion of it in your browser, you can get to all the pages of the brochure. That's what Lew did. Or you can go to Duane's website page and search for Reynolds in his search box.

    IIRC, the '82s had one of the more pitifull centerstands...hernia producing. A kit came out which, of course, is NLA.
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  6. #6
    No longer a member here
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,432
    Beware of the Reynold's ride-off stand! You will not be able to park the bike with either front or rear wheel in the air. It becomes a chore when you start cleaning the wheels or adding air and try to find the valve or have any other maintenance or repair work done where you would want to have the front or rear tire raised off the ground. I bought my R100S with a Reynold's and I learned to hate it so much that I will change back to a stock centerstand this winter for which I have finally aquired all necessary parts.
    Are you sure, your rear shocks are stock length?
    Last edited by EMSimon; 09-17-2013 at 09:06 PM.

  7. #7
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    12,429
    Quote Originally Posted by EMSimon View Post
    I bought my R100S with a Reynold's and I learned to hate it so much that I will change back to a stock centerstand this winter for which I have finally aquired all necessary parts.
    Not to really start anything, but this is another one of those oft posted about accessories with no right answer. I purposefully went to the ride-off stand in the 1980s and absolutely love it. It has its upside and downside. I get much more out of it to outweigh the issues associated with maintenance. Doesn't really bother me. Each person has to make their choice.
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  8. #8
    No longer a member here
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,432
    Quote Originally Posted by 20774 View Post
    . Each person has to make their choice.
    I couldn't agree more. It may helpful, however, if other people detail their experiences so that one can make an "educated" choice...

    So, if the Reynolds "ride-off" center stand is not used as a "ride-off" center stand, what does it become? A poor design of a low, unstable, center stand that just helps lifting the bike on it easier?

  9. #9
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    12,429
    Quote Originally Posted by EMSimon View Post
    So, if the Reynolds "ride-off" center stand is not used as a "ride-off" center stand, what does it become? A poor design of a low, unstable, center stand that just helps lifting the bike on it easier?
    Eau contraire...I find the Reynolds to be a good design and quite stable. With four points touching the ground, the weight is distributed a bit better as opposed to three points, even then a good portion of the weight on the two points of the stock centerstand. No matter what kind of stand you have, you have to think about the surface you're going to park on. If you have metric tires, which have a lower profile, that is going to put more weight on the tires and less on the stand...not a good idea. Another reason to run inch-sized tires.

    And yes, it makes it easier to get the bike on the centerstand. Only when I goof when parking do I ever use it to ride off...not good on the pivot points and drive train. That rarely happens...I'll use the sidestand if necessary to avoid having to ride off.

    The issue with roadside maintenance is also a small consideration in my mind. If I have a flat, I'm not really prepped to repair the tube on the road. I could, if there was no one else in the state or I was 100 miles from the nearest town or had no cell service or whatever...I figure there are other ways out of that than having to worry about which centerstand I have.

    Works for me, and I'd never go back. Sure, I have to think about maintenance in my garage, but I've finally found the set of boards necessary to get the centerstand up on so I can change wheels and perform other maintenance. The number of times I have to do that in a year or so is so small relative to the benefits I get from the stand that it's a no brainer...for me.
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  10. #10
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Pismo Beach, CA
    Posts
    2,923
    Just so's everyone is aware of it, there is a Reynolds #328 (81-82 1000cc) stand up on eBay right now. "Buy-it-now" for $65. Just be sure to read the note on "page 8" (posted above) before you buy.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/BMW-Reynolds...10674362775%26

    Disclaimer: It's not mine, and I have no affiliation with blah, blah, blah. . .. .. .
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  11. #11
    No longer a member here
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,432
    Quote Originally Posted by 20774 View Post
    With four points touching the ground, the weight is distributed a bit better as opposed to three points, even then a good portion of the weight on the two points of the stock centerstand. .
    Sorry, Kurt, but everybody knows that 3 points make a more stable stand than 4. There is no "rocking" with a three legged table, there is plenty in a four-legged table if just one leg is slightly longer or shorter or the ground is ever so slightly uneven. And this is exactly the problem I have with the thing. If the front and rear wheel are not very close to standing on even surface, i.e.; if one wheel sits slightly higher than the other, the Reynolds centerstand can hardly support the bike. A little push and the bike rolls off of it.

    To me the Reynolds stand is one of these "religious" items worshipped by the old guard among the Airhead owners.

    As good condition stock centerstands run in excess of $100.-, I will put my Reynolds -once I have taken it off - up for sale here in the flea market for $150.- (including all hardware to install it) and see if all its fans will put their money where their mouth is!

  12. #12
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    12,429
    Mike -

    I agree, a 3-legged table is more stable than a 4-legged table. But we're talking motorcycles! My experience with my Reynolds stand is completely opposite of yours. It still takes some grunt to get it off and on the stand. Parking in my garage us uber stable. Even when parking elsewhere, motel parking lots, etc. I usually put gas in the bike on the sidestand. I mentioned inch-size tires is much preferred. The proper stand for the year/model is important. Solid stand bushings are important. I'm sure you know all that.

    So, in thinking about it...if the Reynolds vertical distance is quite large, it eventually becomes like a stock centerstand. The bike will sit on the two points of the centerstand and rock back to rest on the rear tire. If the vertical distance is too short, then the bike is primarily resting on the tires with very little touching on the actual stand. That is obviously a very bad situation...possibly somewhat the situation you have where it will roll off easily. But there is the sweet spot in the middle where it works great. Apparently, I lucked out and that's my set up.

    Sorry you want to ditch the thing...it's been a shining spot for me!
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  13. #13
    Day Dreaming ... happy wanderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    1,816
    Quote Originally Posted by lmo1131 View Post
    Just so's everyone is aware of it, there is a Reynolds #328 (81-82 1000cc) stand up on eBay right now. "Buy-it-now" for $65. Just be sure to read the note on "page 8" (posted above) before you buy.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/BMW-Reynolds...10674362775%26

    Disclaimer: It's not mine, and I have no affiliation with blah, blah, blah. . .. .. .
    Thanks for posting this Lew. I don't have the original shocks on the RS but I still have them stored away. I really should have checked the length of the Taiwanese replacements I put on there thinking I would get some good ones someday. In any case I don't recall it being any easier to center stand that bike with the old shocks either. It's just quite heavy and very hard to do alone. With luggage on, no way without another guy yanking on the back.

    I have the same problem with my G/S which is even higher up than the RS on the center stand. I've been looking for an R80 ST stand which apparently works much better. I think a longer pull handle would have been a nice idea too.

    Is any special hardware required or do the stock springs and bushings get used to install the Reynolds?
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
    '81 R80G/S, '82 R100RS, '00 R1100RT

  14. #14
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    12,429
    Quote Originally Posted by happy wanderer View Post
    Is any special hardware required or do the stock springs and bushings get used to install the Reynolds?
    This is believe to be basically what you get in terms of hardware. This is for the stand on my /7.

    http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/showthre...l=1#post763804
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    B.P., MN
    Posts
    685

    Much has been posted on this topic

    as stated before, I've had a couple unpleasant tip overs with the standard center stands, /5 an /6. So many years back flea marketed a Reynolds. Instantly my /6 stood up like a sentinel on watch. If ground gets soggy it sinks down to where the tires rest. the stand is wider and more stable, IMO,,and practice.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •