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Thread: Year

  1. #1
    Einzelkaempfer Whiplash's Avatar
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    Question Year

    After what year is a Bike concidered a "Vintage" Motorcycle?
    I know as the years pass on more will fall into this catagory.
    RS Rennsport, Whiplash Motorsport Group
    AHRMA # 59R

  2. #2
    '99 '03 '06 National Co-Rally Chair Friedle's Avatar
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    Vintage

    General concensus is that after 25 years it enters the "vintage" category, something my motorcycles rider achieved long ago.

    Friedle
    Ride fast safely

  3. #3
    Cannonball Rider #52 darrylri's Avatar
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    The Vintage club says 30 years. The Antique Motorcycle Club of America says 35 years. My buddy in Germany who has a 1920 Victoria with a BMW motor in it says that anything newer than WWII is just a used bike. It's definitely arbitrary.
    --Darryl Richman, forum liaison
    http://darryl.crafty-fox.com

  4. #4
    Einzelkaempfer Whiplash's Avatar
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    Thanks

    Thank you.
    I'm surprized though that not more people post here. It's hard to believe that everyone is riding a new BMW.
    RS Rennsport, Whiplash Motorsport Group
    AHRMA # 59R

  5. #5
    Cannonball Rider #52 darrylri's Avatar
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    Well, maybe not everyone is, but as has been pointed out before, the MOA is a bit late to the party. The Airheads have an active mailing list. If you own a /5 in particular, then you're probably reading /5 United. There are 2 generalized vintage email lists on Yahoo! groups (slash2 - I'm the list owner, and vintagebmwmotorcycles) not to mention the kradrider list that focuses on WWII german bikes (but seems to be nearly exclusively about R12s).
    --Darryl Richman, forum liaison
    http://darryl.crafty-fox.com

  6. #6
    James.A
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    Both of my airheads are 30+ years old, but I consider them to be very good used motorcycles. It takes a great deal of dedication to ride and maintain a pre-1970 bike. I can understand why most people don't want any part of it.

  7. #7
    Cannonball Rider #52 darrylri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodnsteel
    Both of my airheads are 30+ years old, but I consider them to be very good used motorcycles. It takes a great deal of dedication to ride and maintain a pre-1970 bike. I can understand why most people don't want any part of it.
    Well, actually... in my experience it doesn't take that much more dedication to ride a /2, or even a /3. The maintenance comes at you a bit more frequently (3,000 mile service intervals instead of 5,000 on the Airheads), but it's pretty much the same thing -- oil, valves, points, rear wheel splines. No oil filter to change, and the carbs are simpler to play with.

    What is usually the hang up is finding a bike that old that hasn't been buggered up by one or more DPOs (darling previous owner). That, and there are a few longer term service items that are different (magneto coil, slinger cleaning).
    --Darryl Richman, forum liaison
    http://darryl.crafty-fox.com

  8. #8
    rocketman
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    In many states anything over 25 years old is considered "vintage" and can be tagged with vintage tags, though they generally have restrictions on use, some states more than others. And it is true that several of the BMW lists geared toward airheads have been around for quite some time and have a large following unlike this forum and some of the local clubs. There are plenty of airheads out there its just that we're out riding instead of sitting around waiting for our bikes that are in the shop getting fixed! (just kidding on the last part! )

    RM "diehard airhead rider and loving it"

  9. #9
    Focused kbasa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Friedle
    General concensus is that after 25 years it enters the "vintage" category, something my motorcycles rider achieved long ago.

    Friedle


    In another couple years, we'll be ready for vintage Kbikes.
    Dave Swider
    Marin County, CA

    Some bikes. Some with motors, some without.

  10. #10
    James.A
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarrylRi

    What is usually the hang up is finding a bike that old that hasn't been buggered up by one or more DPOs (darling previous owner). That, and there are a few longer term service items that are different (magneto coil, slinger cleaning).
    Darryl, this is exactly the idea I was thinking of. You have a much more intimate experience than I do, but my thoughts are that as vintage motorcycle owners, we have the privelege of being care-takers of special machines, that are now in our possession. We MUST keep them in good condition to pass along to the next generation of enthusiasts who will keep them for the next generation of enthusiasts, etc. This harkens back to an earlier thread regarding what price to sell your bike. When I'm dead, I'm sure it will be "highest bidder". Before then, it's "buyer most worthy".
    Last edited by woodnsteel; 07-20-2005 at 02:49 AM.

  11. #11
    Cannonball Rider #52 darrylri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodnsteel
    Darryl, this is exactly the idea I was thinking of. You have a much more intimate experience than I do,
    Think so, do you?
    Quote Originally Posted by woodnsteel
    but my thoughts are that as vintage motorcycle owners, we have the privelege of being care-takers of special machines, that are now in our possession. We MUST keep them in good condition to pass along to the next generation of enthusiasts who will keep them for the next generation of enthusiasts, etc.
    Well, I'm not quite so misty eyed as that, but it is great fun to be able to ride these bikes, to get a sense of what our roots are here.
    Quote Originally Posted by woodnsteel
    This harkens back to an earlier thread regarding what price to sell your bike. When I'm dead, I'm sure it will be "highest bidder". Before then, it's "buyer most worthy".
    I certainly agree with you here!
    --Darryl Richman, forum liaison
    http://darryl.crafty-fox.com

  12. #12
    James.A
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    Well, my friend, there are few enthusiasts in the USA who are doing more for the preservation of our vintage BMW's than you are.

    I don't think that I am "misty eyed" so much as on a mission. We both know that when we, you particularly, bring a bike to a refined level of function, it is unlikely to backslide. Therefore, we ARE preservationists, or curators perhaps.

    Many of our fellow MOA members are willing to put significant $ into owning a new bike.

    Few are willing to put meaningful $ into historic and/or rare bikes.

    I must agree that the pleasure of ownership is it's own reward.

    Carry on!
    Last edited by woodnsteel; 07-20-2005 at 04:33 AM.

  13. #13
    Cannonball Rider #52 darrylri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodnsteel
    I don't think that I am "misty eyed" so much as on a mission. We both know that when we, you particularly, bring a bike to a refined level of function, it is unlikely to backslide. Therefore, we ARE preservationists, or curators perhaps.
    I really don't like that second word. I'm not running a museum here. I don't buy and work on a bike if I don't think it's going to be a runner, first. I did "restore" my /2, but only after running it around for a year as a rat bike to fix whatever mechanically needed fixing.

    None of my other vintage bikes is "restored": the /3 still has the badly done and incorrect paint scheme that some DPO put on it, along with a few small crash marks on the headlight shell and chrome ring. The R12 is a real bitsa bike, delivered directly to the German army in 1941 but painted in civilian livery (sorta); I'll worry about that after I get it running (maybe).

    Quote Originally Posted by woodnsteel
    Many of our fellow MOA members are willing to put significant $ into owning a new bike.
    Well, that's me. I've got a 2002 R1150RS that is my main ride. It gets all the routine services at the dealer, even though it's out of warranty. The R90S goes to a local independent with 25 years' experience. I'd take the older bikes to a shop for work if I could, because I'm not really that great a mechanic and I get more pleasure out of riding than wrenching. However, nobody around here has any real experience with them, and because I'm interested, I can take the time to learn about it (and fix my mistakes). It's fortunate for me that the older bikes can take somewhat more abuse from me, generally speaking.

    Quote Originally Posted by woodnsteel
    Few are willing to put meaningful $ into historic and/or rare bikes.
    Not enough dollar signs there, I'm afraid. While there are now more parts sources for older beemers, things are not cheap. (Well, I suppose this is still cheaper than a boat or an airplane.) The R12 above, for example, needs a new driveshaft and coupling gear, and a new drive flange, besides hunting up replacements for the leather seals and two new big bearings. It will be hundreds in parts and shipping, and all must come from Europe.

    Quote Originally Posted by woodnsteel
    I must agree that the pleasure of ownership is it's own reward.
    Everyone's gotta have a hobby. Anyway, with just a taste of what the R12 will be like, now that I've rebuilt the fork internals and got the motor running enough to ride it to the gas station, I'm hooked. This bike is going to be really wonderful to ride!

    Quote Originally Posted by woodnsteel
    Carry on!
    Yes sir!
    --Darryl Richman, forum liaison
    http://darryl.crafty-fox.com

  14. #14
    Registered User flybike's Avatar
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    Good starting 'rider' ??

    I have never owned an 'older' Beemer although I am a 'older' rider, (58). My friend/neighbor is always after me to come along for a Sunday romp with his 'Vintage Group' buddies and I would like to try pick up a bike that would be fun to ride and not too much of a challenge to maintain...I have average mechanical skills and have owned bikes for 42 years...too broad a question??
    Any suggestions?

    Jim W.

  15. #15
    Focused kbasa's Avatar
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    I like my 84 R100.

    It's fun and sufficiently cantankerous.
    Dave Swider
    Marin County, CA

    Some bikes. Some with motors, some without.

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