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Thread: Are oilheads more buzzy

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jconway607 View Post
    I also feel that at lower speeds, but higher rpms (3200-3800) the engine seems to be rougher, straining, so to speak. Once at highway speeds, I don't notice it. I have solved this by usually running at about 3000 rpm when not on the expressway. Then it is fine. I was told on this forum that the 1150s have a conterbalancer shaft in the engine that probably solves a lot of this problem. I would almost trade my trusty 1100 to get that, and the 6th gear. But I like the 1100, and I've just learned to live with the less than perfect smoothness. It is, after all, a twin, as has been stated. I can't have everything. And it's really easy to work on.
    that sounds like your cables are not correctly synched for higher (normal) rpm running (although not being familiar with the 1100R cable system, I could be mistaken on that). Synch the BBS at idle, cables at 4K or so.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  2. #17
    just hangin' out 2bikemike's Avatar
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    I wonder if faulty stick coils could be the problem? Aside from the buzziness, my symptoms are a very rough idle, (to the point of adding throttle at stops) diminished fuel economy and in the higher rpm's the engine seems to "load up" and kinda bog down as I accelerate to the higher rpm range. It's not very pronounced but I know it's there. I am confident that the valves and TB are in good order. I don't really want to gamble prices for new stick coils at this time without having some indication that they were bad.
    keep it light enough to travel.....
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  3. #18
    just hangin' out 2bikemike's Avatar
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    A few weeks late with this update but, I did go ahead and order the stick coils. After installing them, I am simply amazed at the marked improvement in performance. No more buzzy seat, pegs or hand grips. Power has increased, mpg's have improved, idle is smooth and silky, and power roll on is simply awesome. My source.....http://euromotoelectrics.com
    keep it light enough to travel.....
    '04 R1150RT
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  4. #19
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    On a running multi-cylinder internal combustion engine, vibration comes from only two basic causes:
    1. Mechanical imbalance
    2. Combustion imbalance

    There is some inherent slight mechanical imbalance. But that is unlikely to change much over time unless you have internal transmission problems or driveline universal joint problems. If you have an oiling problem on one cylinder a heavy build up of carbon on only one piston top can cause a buzzy vibration.

    Most vibration changes over time however are due to combustion imbalance. Throttle synch matches air flow (absent other obstructions), clean injectors match fuel flow, valve adjustment is critical, good spark plugs are important, etc. A significant difference in compression could be a factor.

    Bottom line is that the bike probably needs a meticulous tune-up.

    Edit: Ooops! I ought to look at the end of a thread before adding comments.

    p.s. I hate stick coils!
    Last edited by PGlaves; 10-23-2013 at 04:58 PM.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
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  5. #20
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    Nice description Paul.

    You can further reduce the fueling imbalance by richening the mixture. The way this happens is that as you richen the mixture, the small amount of unburned O2 in a stock motor gets consumed. Once the O2 has been used up, any excess fuel in the richer of the two cylinders doesn't add power. Bottom line is that the power produced by each cylinder is then affected mostly by the air balance.

    RB

    P.S. I just replaced my stick coils too. I was very surprised at the improvements in starting and running.

  6. #21
    Left Coast Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger 04 RT View Post
    I just replaced my stick coils too. I was very surprised at the improvements in starting and running.
    So would these be judged a "wear item" and should be replaced at a certain mileage/age? I was always under the impression that coils either worked or they didn't.

  7. #22
    MOA #24991 Pauls1150's Avatar
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    Coils aren't "supposed" to be a wear item, but these sticks sure do seem to have a crappy failure rate. I've replaced both of mine, too... big difference!

  8. #23
    Just me rad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC1100S View Post
    So would these be judged a "wear item" and should be replaced at a certain mileage/age? I was always under the impression that coils either worked or they didn't.
    The problem is the difference between one of them working or not working can be mild enough you may only notice more buzz and decreased mileage, as I did.

    Just do the quick test if you are not sure. First look closely at the connection between the stick coil and the power lead. Make sure you know how to release it without wrecking the connector. Start the bike, let it idle, disconnect the power lead at the stick coil on one side, if the idle does not change, that stick coil is bad. Turn off the bike, reconnect the lead and do the other side.

  9. #24
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC1100S View Post
    So would these be judged a "wear item" and should be replaced at a certain mileage/age? I was always under the impression that coils either worked or they didn't.
    Not a wear item, but it seems they do. Both of my stick coils were fully functional. Each side would run on only the stick. When I put new coils in, the bike idled and started noticeably better.

  10. #25
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    It's only 2004 Oilheads that have stick coils, correct?
    Kent Christensen
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    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  11. #26
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    yes, 2004 ,some listed as 2005 1150's. the prior models were single spark and conventional coils

    Roger, if the side would only run on the stick coil. was the conventional coil bad?
    Steve Henson
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  12. #27
    just hangin' out 2bikemike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rad View Post
    The problem is the difference between one of them working or not working can be mild enough you may only notice more buzz and decreased mileage, as I did.

    Just do the quick test if you are not sure. First look closely at the connection between the stick coil and the power lead. Make sure you know how to release it without wrecking the connector. Start the bike, let it idle, disconnect the power lead at the stick coil on one side, if the idle does not change, that stick coil is bad. Turn off the bike, reconnect the lead and do the other side.
    I think you left out a few steps. Disconnecting the stick coil from its power lead with the engine running will likely result in the operator being knocked on his duff. As I understand, you simply pull the coil from the spark plug, leaving the plug in the head, attach another plug to the stick coil and ground it to to the valve cover. Something about the electrical energy needing a path to terminate.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_vm7C5buVU
    Last edited by 2bikemike; 10-24-2013 at 06:20 PM. Reason: add link
    keep it light enough to travel.....
    '04 R1150RT
    '81 Honda CB650 Custom

  13. #28
    Just me rad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2bikemike View Post
    I think you left out a few steps. Disconnecting the stick coil from its power lead with the engine running will likely result in the operator being knocked on his duff.
    Nope, not for me or the service tech who showed he how to do it.

  14. #29
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by henzilla View Post
    yes, 2004 ,some listed as 2005 1150's. the prior models were single spark and conventional coils

    Roger, if the side would only run on the stick coil. was the conventional coil bad?
    The main coil was fine. I was just indicating that it would run with only the stick coils. That way I knew the coils were functional.
    RB

  15. #30
    WineGuyD wineguyd's Avatar
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    A dent in my front rim turned out to be the culprit for vibration at 4500+ rpm! I had the wheel straightened and re-balanced and it made a noticeable difference.
    Purveyor of fine wines & spirits
    Rides a 1996 R1100R

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