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Thread: 2011 R1200GSA Brake Pad Change

  1. #1
    roamingbeemer roamingbeemer's Avatar
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    Cool 2011 R1200GSA Brake Pad Change

    Hi All, Just changed my rear brake pads to EBC new pads. I just finished running them in and I noticed how hot the caliper gets even when not using the brakes. The front calipers were almost cool while I could hardly touch the rear. Is it normal to have a little drag on the rear wheel as I spin it on the center stand which must be creating the heat? I get maybe 1/4 turn of the wheel if I give it a good spin. This is my first R1200 so any information is appreciated, especially if this is normal so I may rest my mind. Thanks,
    Seek Fun. "Any fool can criticize, condemn and complain--and most fools do" BF
    2009 K1300GT, S1000RR sold, F650 sold
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  2. #2
    Registered User mpmarty's Avatar
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    The rear caliper pins are dragging and will warp the disk if not fixed. There are "how tos" on this forum and I'd pull that caliper apart and clean and lube the slider parts.

    http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/showthre...eplacement-DIY
    Marty - in the western Oregon mountains.'06RT, (gone '04RT, '86 Venture Royal, '81 Yamaha Virago920, '82Suzuki GS1100GK, '76 Suzuki GT750, Triumph 750 Bonneville, BSA Road Rocket 650, 61" Harley knucklehead)

  3. #3
    roamingbeemer roamingbeemer's Avatar
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    thanks for that. It did not appear they are sticking to me and I did clean and lubricate the caliper. I will pull apart again. How far does the wheel turn with a good pull on the wheel? I do remember with the OEM pads it would have some drag since it was new but I never gave it a thought as it was new from the dealer.
    Seek Fun. "Any fool can criticize, condemn and complain--and most fools do" BF
    2009 K1300GT, S1000RR sold, F650 sold
    2011 R1200GSA
    2014 Kawasaki DTracker 250 (Chiang Mai Thailand)

  4. #4
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    One other thought - check the fluid level in the rear reservoir. IF the fluid had been "topped off" during a service without the pads being replaced, chances are there is too much fluid in the reservoir, and no room for fluid to return from the calipers after releasing the brake. This can cause the sort of drag you're experiencing. FWIW - you should NOT "top-off" fluid on a BMW. If the level is set to MAX when there are new pads in the calipers, it will not drop below "LOW" when the pads are worn out, and will return to MAX when you replace the pads. Worth remembering this also if doing the 24 month brake fluid flush. Retract the pistons all the way into the caliper before setting the level. Then set it to max. And pump the piston(s) back out before taking off.
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders New Sweden BMW Riders
    '07 R1200R (current ride) and some bimmers.. and a Porsche

  5. #5
    Registered User lkraus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpmarty View Post
    The rear caliper pins are dragging and will warp the disk if not fixed. There are "how tos" on this forum and I'd pull that caliper apart and clean and lube the slider parts.

    http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/showthre...eplacement-DIY
    Lube is necessary, but too much can be a problem as well. Air has to move along the slider shaft as the caliper moves out; too much grease forms an air seal that keeps the caliper from moving out away from the disc. Slide the caliper back and forth on the front slider a few times before rotating it back down over the disc - it should not feel like it is on a spring.
    Larry
    2006 R1200RT

  6. #6
    roamingbeemer roamingbeemer's Avatar
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    I did not find any problems with the caliper. I have now discovered how hot the rear brakes get on bikes. I rode my other bike and it also got very hot on the rear caliper and disc without hardly any braking on front or rear. In both cases the front calipers and disc were almost cool but the rear was considerable hotter. Maybe partly to the increased airflow on the front brakes (guessing). Brake fluid takes a beating almost as bad as oil. I am going to remember that as I drag the rear brake slightly entering a turn or practising slow speed maneuvering.

    The EBC pads also took a while to brake in which may have increased the initial drag but all appears normal now with almost a full rotation of the wheel after a good spin. I took the bike to the dealer yesterday for the annual and all was fine.
    Seek Fun. "Any fool can criticize, condemn and complain--and most fools do" BF
    2009 K1300GT, S1000RR sold, F650 sold
    2011 R1200GSA
    2014 Kawasaki DTracker 250 (Chiang Mai Thailand)

  7. #7
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    Double check to be sure your foot isn't dragging on the pedal when you're not using it. The somewhat small pedal of BMWs have had more than one do this accidentally.

    There is no inherent reason for the rear rotor to be much hotter than fronts just because its a slider. I've never checked to see if heat from the cat and pipe washes over the rear rotor, wouldn't expect much to.

    There is one source of heat at the back other than brake. Its the rotating final drive gear creating heat in its lube simply from fluid friction. An FD will feel quite warm to the touch, almost hot, after a fast ride and its from that fluid friction.

  8. #8
    roamingbeemer roamingbeemer's Avatar
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    My foot is not big and I am positive I am not dragging the brake. My other bike (S1000RR) has original pads from new and it was also hot on the rear caliper but the fronts were much cooler with almost no braking.

    I rode a K1300GT while my bike was in for the annual and I experiemented and found the same hot rear caliper and disc while the front was much cooler. The dealer told me the only time they have seen a warped disc is as you said in the previous post of dragging the brake with a foot.
    Seek Fun. "Any fool can criticize, condemn and complain--and most fools do" BF
    2009 K1300GT, S1000RR sold, F650 sold
    2011 R1200GSA
    2014 Kawasaki DTracker 250 (Chiang Mai Thailand)

  9. #9
    roamingbeemer roamingbeemer's Avatar
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    This is an old thread but I just read some interesting evaluations. It is a Law Enforcement evaluation of different bikes and they list the brake rotor temperatures after a set course. The BMW R1200 and the Honda ST1300 had very high rear brake rotor temperatures.

    BMW R1200RTP Front-178? Rear-363?, Honda ST1300 Front-313? Rear-432?.

    The BMW G650 was Front-198? Rear-131.5? and the HD Road King was Front-205? Rear-178.5?.
    Seek Fun. "Any fool can criticize, condemn and complain--and most fools do" BF
    2009 K1300GT, S1000RR sold, F650 sold
    2011 R1200GSA
    2014 Kawasaki DTracker 250 (Chiang Mai Thailand)

  10. #10
    roamingbeemer roamingbeemer's Avatar
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    For some reason the degrees symbol shows up as a question mark in the reply above. Therefore the ? mark equals Degrees.

    I assume it must be degrees F because it is a US evaluation from the LA Sheriff.
    Seek Fun. "Any fool can criticize, condemn and complain--and most fools do" BF
    2009 K1300GT, S1000RR sold, F650 sold
    2011 R1200GSA
    2014 Kawasaki DTracker 250 (Chiang Mai Thailand)

  11. #11
    Registered User
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    BMW's with linked brakes are hard on rear pads because they're working not only when the pedal is pressed but every time the fronts are used also. The same riders that almost never have to replace rear pads on other motorcycles have to do so routinely on these bikes.
    14 R1200GSA, 93 R100R. No car is as fun to drive as any motorcycle is to ride.

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