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Thread: 1987 K100RS- Hard Downshifting

  1. #1
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    1987 K100RS- Hard Downshifting

    I've got a 1987 K100RS with just under 31,000 miles on it.

    While riding tonight, I noticed that my downshifts were getting a little rough. What I mean by this is that it was getting a little harder to push the shift lever down to move from gear to gear. Before tonight, if I simply placed my foot on the top of the shift lever and pulled in the clutch, the weight of my leg would cause the downshift. While riding tonight, I had to actually apply downward force to the lever before it would engage the next lower gear. The clutch felt no different, nor did the feeling of an upshift.

    Does anyone have any thoughts that may help me? Is this something I should be worried about?

  2. #2
    3 Red Bricks
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    Probably time for a clutch spline lube.



    LONG MAY YOUR BRICK FLY!

    Ride Safe, Ride Far, Ride Often

    Lee Fulton Forum Moderator
    3 Marakesh Red K75Ss
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  3. #3
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    I'll second Lee's thought. That's the classic symptom of dry clutch splines.. It's a biggish job, but not rocket science, and many home wrenches have managed to DIY. Plan on it being a half-hour job*

    Half-hour job = at least ALL day. Possibly more, depends on what breaks, and how long it takes to get a replacement. I got really good at spline lubes at one point (don't ask why, it wasn't a good thing..) and got it down to 45 minutes with two of us (both somewhat decent wrenches) working on it, on a lift in a garage with all the right tools. That said - for the first time, don't make it when you NEED the bike. Plan on at least a 1 day job.
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
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  4. #4
    Registered User jwetering's Avatar
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    I just did mine recently. It took me about three and a half hours...but I had done it before....or more correctly I hadn't done it well enough before which is why I was doing it again.

    My minimal lube job lasted about 1.5 years until downshifting became very difficult. One thing I noticed was that if I pulled in the clutch and waited a second or two it would shift like normal; especially if I gave the motor a little bump while the clutch was pulled.

    This should work as a check to verify dry splines are your issue.
    jasper
    north vancouver

    1990 K75S

  5. #5
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    Thank you all, for your help.

    When performing the clutch spline lube, what lube did you use? In reading about the process and watching Chris Harris' videos on YouTube on the issue, the Staburags paste is called for those splines.

    Have you guys tried anything else that is more readily available than the Staburags?

  6. #6
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    http://guarddogmoly.com/gd525.shtml

    35,000 miles since application on my K75 and still shifts smoothly. I also use it on the rear splines.
    Ron

    91 K75RT ABS

  7. #7
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    Being that far in you should go for the clutch nut o-ring. It also gives you a chance to look at how much clutch you have left.
    Jeff
    93 K1100LT
    03 K1200GT

  8. #8
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffd View Post
    Being that far in you should go for the clutch nut o-ring. It also gives you a chance to look at how much clutch you have left.
    Jeff
    IMHO - only if there are indications of a leak. It is much more of a job to get to the nut and O-ring.. and you need some way of aligning the clutch plate when reassembling. It takes a 45 minute job to about 1.5 hours (using the same scale as above..)
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders New Sweden BMW Riders
    '07 R1200R (current ride) and some bimmers.. and a Porsche

  9. #9
    3 Red Bricks
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    AND you need to be absolutely positive that the clutch housing (flywheel), and the two pressure plates remain in the same relative rotational position to each other or you will end up with a vibration. The three pieces are not individually perfectly balanced. They are balanced to a tolerance with the light/heavy spot (don't remember which) marked. The three marks are supposed to be aligned 120 degrees apart for the best balance. The problem is that the factory marks disappear so you must mark the relationship BEFORE you disassemble.

    Clutch discs on these bikes easily go way over 100,000 miles unless abused or contaminated.


    LONG MAY YOUR BRICK FLY!

    Ride Safe, Ride Far, Ride Often

    Lee Fulton Forum Moderator
    3 Marakesh Red K75Ss
    Mine, Hers, Spare

  10. #10
    3 Red Bricks
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    AND you need to be absolutely positive that the clutch housing (flywheel), and the two pressure plates remain in the same relative rotational position to each other or you will end up with a vibration. The three pieces are not individually perfectly balanced. They are balanced to a tolerance with the light/heavy spot (don't remember which) marked. The three marks are supposed to be aligned 120 degrees apart for the best balance. The problem is that the factory marks disappear so you must mark the relationship BEFORE you disassemble.

    Unless it's leaking, probably not worth all the extra work.

    Clutch discs on these bikes easily go way over 100,000 miles unless abused or contaminated.


    LONG MAY YOUR BRICK FLY!

    Ride Safe, Ride Far, Ride Often

    Lee Fulton Forum Moderator
    3 Marakesh Red K75Ss
    Mine, Hers, Spare

  11. #11
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    Thanks again, everyone, for your input.

    I was able to do the clutch spline lube without any hitches. I had to replace the original clutch arm boot on the backside of the transmission, but that was it!

    The splines themselves were pretty dry, but in good shape. I rode it yesterday and all seems good. Smooth upshifting and downshifting.

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