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Thread: New poster with question.

  1. #1
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    New poster with question.

    Greetings, I hope I'm on the correct forum; I own a 2011 R1200RT.
    I've never encountered this issue, but a screw got lodged on the rear tire. See attachment.
    I've called three shops, the first two stated I need to replace the tire due it it being a hazard to repair, the last one stated they would repair it for $90.
    What are your opinions on this matter? Thanks!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by so_tx_rider View Post
    Greetings, I hope I'm on the correct forum; I own a 2011 R1200RT.
    I've never encountered this issue, but a screw got lodged on the rear tire. See attachment.
    I've called three shops, the first two stated I need to replace the tire due it it being a hazard to repair, the last one stated they would repair it for $90.
    What are your opinions on this matter? Thanks!
    Replace the tire. Although unlikely plugs and internal patches can work loose. The vast majority of motorcycle facilities are not willing to assume the risk due to potentially being sued in the event of a crash.

  3. #3
    rabid reader dbrick's Avatar
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    Welcome aboard, so_tx_rider.

    You'll find this topic - whether to repair or replace a punctured or damaged motorcycle tire - is a persistent one, coming up over and over again. The range of opinions vary from "always replace the tire" to "I've repaired tires for years successfully." Your tolerance for risk may be different than mine; your budget may be different, too.

    I think most of us would agree on these points:

    ・ The larger the hole, the harder it is to patch.

    ・ Demounting the tire and repairing it from the inside produces a more durable repair than repair from the outside.

    ・ Wires in the tire's steel belt can cut and destroy externally-applied plugs.

    ・ Repairs to the sidewall are usually impossible, and, because of the sidewall's flexing, not a good idea.

    This is a YMMV situation. I have repaired several tires with small holes in the tread. On the other hand, I'm well aware that continued inflation and a small patch of rubber is all there is between my body and the pavement. If I have any feeling at all that a repair would be dicey, I replace the tire. I've discarded a lot of good tread over the years, and slept much better for having done so.
    David Brick
    Santa Cruz CA
    2007 R1200R

  4. #4
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    I put a high value on safety, and yes I can afford to purchase a new tire if needed (I bought the bike new, cash). Ill go ahead and purchase a new tire.

    BTW: I've already replaced the front one last month since it didn't pass inspection; the independent shop who changed out the tire stated BMW uses a cheap front tire since it wore out after 8000 miles. Paid $140 for a Michelin Pilot tire.

  5. #5
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    $90 is close enough to the price of a new tire that I wouldn't think there would be much of a question.
    2000 R1100RT / 1987 K75C (RIP) / Santa Clarita, CA

  6. #6
    Registered User kioolt's Avatar
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    I would plug it and watch it for a few days. After that I would just check the air in it at the regular interval. I've never had a plugged tire fail on me. I'm to cheap to replace a tire with that much tread left. I know this post is going to get a lot of comments about safety and peace of mind. If it bothers you then replace the tire. I would not try to repair a tire with a sidewall failure.
    2004 R1150RT 151,500 miles , 1991 K100LT 128,000 miles, 1982 R100RT 106,900 miles
    Total 386,400 BMW miles
    AMA,BMWRA,BMWMOA
    The cheapest thing on a BMW is the nut that connects the handlebars to the seat.

  7. #7
    Sir Darby Darryl Cainey's Avatar
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    I have had many tires plugged from the inside without ever leaking, any car tire place can do it'
    take the tire off the rim and take it in hand.
    Ambassador BMW MOA Ontario Canada
    President Niagara BMW Riders #298
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    1977 R100RS, (Retired) 1993 R100GS (just getting started)

  8. #8
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Is it even leaking? I have had short screws like that, once removed...no leaky... And have plugged or internal patched many and gotten full life...sometimes 8K would be a blessing on chip-seal Texas roads.


    As far as cheap tires...they spec two or three different brands. I have seen Metzelers, Continentals and I believe Dunlops on showroom models.
    None are cheap, some just perform better than others.

    AND...Welcome to the Forum How's the heat this week in SoTX...105 here today!
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darryl Cainey View Post
    I have had many tires plugged from the inside without ever leaking, any car tire place can do it'
    take the tire off the rim and take it in hand.
    Had an answer in place but then remembered this gentleman is calling to carry the tire-only in for repair. Probably eases the way but it can be exceptionally difficult to remove some of today's tires off a rim. And, very probably impossible to do so. If this solution appeals to you I would highly recommend trying to remove a tire at home first to determine if you yourself are capable of doing it. Also, different tire brands/models will have different levels of difficulty. Substantially different. I would try it at home. Should you change tire brand/model at some point I would try the new brand at home as well. In other words always test your capabilities every time you change brand/model tire. If you're going to rely on this answer as a potential solution you need to know with certainty you're capable of removing the tire in the first place.

    A worthwhile alternative may be to carry a tube with you (assuming you have space) in order to get you out of a "situation". It will be easier having to deal with removing one-side of the tire as opposed to two. Then replace the tire (assuming tubeless) once you're back to civilization again. There are also temporary repair kits designed to hopefully get you going again if need be. But time to stop. These answers are beyond the scope of the question.

    To get back to your question. In the world of motorcycles controlling your level of risk is a daily affair. Patches and plugs can work. The real question is are you willing to assume the risk of one letting go given the small chance that letting go will occur.

  10. #10
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    Found this answer in another thread entitled "First Tour in Five Years" a few threads below yours:

    http://www.tirerepairkit.com/default.htm

    These folks are stating the repair is permanent. I'm not going to comment on that. However, I do think this is possibly a more realistic opportunity for self-repair when in the middle of nowhere. Make sure you have the ability to re-inflate the tire.

    I unfortunately forgot the name of the person who posted this. He/she should be credited with this suggestion and not me.

  11. #11
    RT in NC
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    I picked up a nail the other day. Wish I had taken a pic. Went in the grove hoizontal. Pulled it out no leak. Lucky me. I carry a plug kit for on the road but would replace the tire if I was home on in a place with a bike shop carrying tires and a mechanic to put it on.

  12. #12
    RT in NC
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    Kit looks interesting.

  13. #13
    Lucky motorradmike's Avatar
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    I'd remove the screw.
    Plug it.
    Ride it.
    Take the tire off and patch it from the inside when you have time and inclination.

    If I owned a shop I wouldn't want the liability so would tell you "if you want us to do it we have to replace the tire".
    Mike Marr
    1978 Yamaha XS750 (Needs rings), 1996 BMW R1100RS, 2004 Honda CRF230F

  14. #14
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    an old rule? Bike has but two tires both on which our lives depend. Saving money seems not much of a consideration when it comes to the formula. there are plenty very good cheap new tires to be had. Two cents.

  15. #15
    Proud Veteran SteveAikens's Avatar
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    I think you made the correct decision to replace the tire. This is one of those that everyone has an opinion on. Some repair, some replace.

    For me, I plug tires only to get to a shop to replace them. It's my life that is at risk if the patch/plug/repair fails. To me, that's the end of the story.

    To answer the oft asked question again, yes, I have seen the result of a crash - first hand - of a "repaired" tire failure. The rider was only slightly scuffed up becasue he was wearing the proper gear, but unfortunately, his motorcycle was laid up for three weeks getting repaired.

    Not worth the risk - always replace IMO....
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    Steve Aikens, Clovis, NM
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