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Thread: tire pressure

  1. #1
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    tire pressure

    What are the best tire pressures for new Pilot 3's on a 2002 R1150 RT?

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    What does your MOM have to say about it?

    http://www.michelinmotorcycle.com/ad...tire-pressures
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

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    Registered User WalterK75's Avatar
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    Some people use the 10% rule. Measure tire pressure cold. Ride bike and when finished measure tire pressure. It should be up 10% from original reading. If higher than 10%, increase original air pressure. If lower than 10%, reduce original air pressure. Flexing of tire accounts for pressure increases.
    Walter

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    40 PSI both front and rear. Makes it easy for me to stay on top of tire pressure whileon the road.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EMSimon View Post
    40 PSI both front and rear. Makes it easy for me to stay on top of tire pressure whileon the road.
    given that you are running a smaller tire up front than in back, going to = pressure is not the ideal setting. Might be easier to remember and check, but 40 up front on most bikes (and certainly on any of your listed bikes other than possibly the KGT, but even that one I doubt) is going to be too much for best handling or tire life. Nearly every manufacturer recommendation I've ever seen shows about a 4-6 psi drop between f & r. 40r/36f would be about typical. Some go higher to protect soft rims from denting.
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  6. #6
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    I have been running 40/42 on my 94RS with Avon Storms, Conti Road Attacks and Metzler Z6 tires. Usually get about 12,000 miles per tire. Handling and grip seem fine even when I lean to within 1/2 of the tread edges. Still on my original "soft" 3-spoke rims with no runout or bend damage. No cupping/scalloping on the front etiher, which is due in part to the tire pressure but moreso to having quality shocks with good consistent damping.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerfish1100 View Post
    given that you are running a smaller tire up front than in back, going to = pressure is not the ideal setting. Might be easier to remember and check, but 40 up front on most bikes (and certainly on any of your listed bikes other than possibly the KGT, but even that one I doubt) is going to be too much for best handling or tire life. Nearly every manufacturer recommendation I've ever seen shows about a 4-6 psi drop between f & r. 40r/36f would be about typical. Some go higher to protect soft rims from denting.
    This was a question in the Oilhead section, specifically for a R1150RT. I responded with an answer concerning my R1100RT. On the K16GT, I run 42/42. You may be surprised to hear that some tire manufacturers specify a higher pressure for their skinny tires than for the fat ones.

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    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    I would be surprised if the subject were Michelin, as Michelin recommends following motorcycle manufacturer specifications and BMW does not specify equal pressures front and rear.
    Kent Christensen
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    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

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    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    I would be surprised if the subject were Michelin, as Michelin recommends following motorcycle manufacturer specifications and BMW does not specify equal pressures front and rear.
    This doesn't have anything to do with running the right or wrong tire pressure, but everything with liability.
    So, if Michelin recommends following motorcycle manufacturer specifications and someone puts Michelins on a Harley FXSTS, then the front skinny 21" tire will run at a higher pressure than the fat 18" rear.

  10. #10
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    Anybody with any understanding of engineering knows that specifications and liability are the same thing and that it comes from engineering and not lawyers. It's a typical statement from the ignorant and those determined to promote themselves as smarter than engineers. ... This NEVER happens.
    Kent Christensen
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  11. #11
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Mod hat on>

    let's keep things on track here fellows...

    < Mod hat off




    Best course is to follow the manufacturers suggested pressures for your particular model regardless of tire brand. Folks tweak pressures to suit their wallets or riding styles...so what?

    I personally do not run higher pressures in the front as it is too hard for my riding style of wearing the edges down. My experience in rain riding also got me not over-inflating the front. YRMV
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    Registered User dieselyoda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    Anybody with any understanding of engineering knows that specifications and liability are the same thing and that it comes from engineering and not lawyers. It's a typical statement from the ignorant and those determined to promote themselves as smarter than engineers. ... This NEVER happens.
    What an awesome statement. I think the string should go on.............
    1997 R1100RT (Restored Basket Case) , 1981 KZ 440 LTD (Restored Basket Case)
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    Survivor akbeemer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by henzilla View Post
    Best course is to follow the manufacturers suggested pressures for your particular model regardless of tire brand. Folks tweak pressures to suit their wallets or riding styles...so what?

    I personally do not run higher pressures in the front as it is too hard for my riding style of wearing the edges down. My experience in rain riding also got me not over-inflating the front. YRMV
    Your tires, your backside...go ride
    I would normally tend to agree that it is smart to follow the manufacturers guidance on tire pressure or anything else..... but, in the case or front tire pressure on my R1200R and R1200RT I have wondered away from the printed guidance. On both bikes I was running the recommended pressures and experiencing sever cupping. On the RT I went thru two front tires in 6000 miles. I have for some time been running 39-40 PSI up front and have had zero cupping on three tires comprised of two brands. In about 25K miles of running the higher pressures I have had no handling issues in the wet or dry. Works for me, but then I don't claim to be the second coming of V. Rossi.
    Kevin Huddy
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    Registered User chewbacca's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    Anybody with any understanding of engineering knows that specifications and liability are the same thing and that it comes from engineering and not lawyers. It's a typical statement from the ignorant and those determined to promote themselves as smarter than engineers. ... This NEVER happens.
    NEVER????? Engineers came up with the 10% rule. They also designed the TPS system which is so unreliable for specific pressure that its only practical purpose is to let you know you are losing air. So which set of engineers do you listen to?
    Old But Not Dead
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    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    Anybody with any understanding of engineering knows that specifications and liability are the same thing and that it comes from engineering and not lawyers. It's a typical statement from the ignorant and those determined to promote themselves as smarter than engineers. ... This NEVER happens.
    This doesn't really address the previous comments. My referring to "liability" was based on the fact that Michelin recommends to follow manufacturers recommendation.

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