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Thread: Electrical wire question: 2008 R1200RT

  1. #1
    Cowboyatheart
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    Electrical wire question: 2008 R1200RT

    I am looking for some advice.

    This is likely a no brainer for 99.5% of you, but if you can indulge me, and answer the following I would truly appreciate it.


    I want to add some 14? or 16? guage wiring to my R1200RT from a PDM60 to auxiliary lights. Clearwater is going to install the Krista's for me at the Rally.

    However, I will have the tank and tupperware off (next week) to install the PDM60, my GPS and a new horn. So clearwater said if I run 16 guage wire from the PDM60 location to the front of the bike and leave some extra feet of wire, that will speed up their install.

    The Question is: What kind of wire is suitable (coating, resistance to weather ...)?

    Here is a link for two different types with different protection/insulation, copper wire, (I also assume that if the installation requires 16 guage, 14 guage will be okay too, or perhaps it is overkill).

    http://www.princessauto.com/pal/en/W...--FT/4210624.p

    or

    http://www.princessauto.com/pal/en/W...Wire/8216533.p

    Advise please?

    Thanks in advance for your help.

    Neil
    604 258 8548
    Neil
    Want to be happy for a day? Drink. Want to be happy for a year? Get married. Want to be happy for life? Ride a BMW!
    www.TasteMoringa.com Smart Mix & XM3 Energy Drink are the puppies to view...IMO

  2. #2
    Kitsap County Rounder cwsenn's Avatar
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    Neil, the 16 guage wire should be more than sufficient and the 14 guage is more than likely overkill.

    See you at the rally,
    Chuck Senn
    2006 R1200RT (Red)

  3. #3
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    What amperage will your lights pull? My 100 watt lights pull about 8 amps. 18 AWG is more than adequate -- rated at 16 amps vs 22 amps for 16 AWG. For use on a bike I prefer GXL wire -- high temp automotive grade suitable for engine compartments. I purchased this wire kit not so long ago to have a mixture of colors for wiring up various farkles for the new bike.

  4. #4
    Outlander Omega Man's Avatar
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    As for gauge, I agree with Marc. It's pretty easy to find what I would call "automotive hook-up wire" at a Napa store. When it's real fussy, I pick up some tinned copper wire at a marine store such as West Marine. If you are going to run a few wires, you might want to look at the "split-loom" wire sheath. While this is kinda way out there, on a pick-up truck, I'll run a "wire-chase" out of PVC irrigation pipe from front to back (for future runs).
    If your so inclined, take some pictures so we can see how it turns out.
    OM
    "Well they say.. time loves a hero but only time will tell.. If he's real, he's a legend from heaven If he ain't he was sent here from hell" Lowell George
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  5. #5
    Registered User
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    This is simple
    16 gauge is plenty for any of the common LED lights and is an easy to handle gauge.
    For halogens which draw more current, 14 gauge is proper for the runs to the lamps for nortmal wattage bulbs. (Today, use of extremely high power halogens 100W etc is essentially obsolete as one can make more light with a lot less current several other ways)

    In principle you could use general automotive wire from any parts place (uncoated copper stranded conductor) but I prefer to use tinned copper conductor marine wire, a bit more pricey, from any marine dealer. Tinned conductors make for more corrosion resistant installs which may matter if you plan lots of years with wet miles or live near the salt air of the coast like I do.

    I like to color code my installs- red for postive, black for ground

    Other factors that contribute to longevity of an install are use of wire loom and adequate number of cable ties to protect against vibration cutting or breakage, shrink wrap or use of waterproof connectors, etc etc..


    FWIW, marchymans notes on wire gauge do not meet normal accepted stds for 12V DC wiriing. You cannot carry the amperage he notes safely at 12V. Even at 110V AC, 16 gauge extension cords are normally limited to 15A rating. Larger gauges (smaller number) are required to prevent voltage drops. For halogen setups, even small voltage drops have serious impact on output. For LEDs, its less critical- the lamps internal circuits can handle a range of voltages and still have the same output.

  6. #6
    Cowboyatheart
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    Thanks for the help, advice and suggestions.

    I will pick up parts tomorrow.
    Neil
    Want to be happy for a day? Drink. Want to be happy for a year? Get married. Want to be happy for life? Ride a BMW!
    www.TasteMoringa.com Smart Mix & XM3 Energy Drink are the puppies to view...IMO

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