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Thread: Improving Dying Road Racing

  1. #31
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    These are excellent points.
    Racer interaction with fans has always been key. In NASCAR, its part of a driver's job automatically as are sponsor hospitality interactions- makes the whole game more fun for everyone. There are plenty of folks in many sports who understand that signing autographs for hours, as tiring as it might be, is what makes their endorsement career $ possible.

    I've got a friend who for various reasons got invited to Ferrari's hospitality gigs at a few F-1 races (as a guest and not even in the US!) - lavish and up close and personal with all members of their team from managers to drivers to pit crew. Followed by race action seen from the private Ferrari boxes so one can root for the guys you just met. Guess who he follows these days?

    I remember casually meeting Gary Nixon a couple times at local bike shops near Baltimore when I was just learning to ride in the 1960s- followed his career with interest. (The Triumph importer was in Timonium and tested bikes on a nearby road and undeveloped land there). Disappointed by his too young death a while ago..

    No doubt internet fan interactions are becoming more important and far more possible with the proliferation of smartphones. Racing series that adapt can be predicted to garner additional fans for doing so..

    In Supercross, note the mingling of the crowd with the teams in between heats. Even in Monster Truck the drivers go out of the way to play to their fans- running vehicles right into and beyond the point of destruction, sometimes even on their side, knowing full well that it will take extra repair $ and crew time to fix the damage. The two leaders of the Senior TT at Isle of Mann give great, thoughtful interviews though not as polished as some others. Grumpy non social bike racers are and will continue to be a thing of the past- if for no other reason that virtually all modern racing rapidly becomes a team sport aas one progresses- loners, no matter their talent, will be limited..

  2. #32
    Still Wondering mika's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC1100S View Post
    All available on MotoGP.com right now. As I mentioned earlier, its 99 Euro a year. With Dorna now owning WSBK, and having already published rule changes to take effect for 2014, you can count on WSBK being available on a subscription basis in the near future. snipped
    I knew that, thanks for reminding me. I'm blaming my mistake on doing to many things at once.
    Pass the mustard and UP THE REVOLUTION!

    St. Paul Pioneer Press , Minneapolis Star Tribune

  3. #33
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    As a racing junky i admit to watching about everything that comes on the tube for at least a few minutes.

    Wife was watching an Indy car parade the other day and asked me who the heck designed the paint on those cars. She said several of them looked like Detroit camo test mules . I watched and darned if she was not right, several of the cars looked like they had pieces and parts on them left over from a wreck from the odd and mismatched colors ???
    For the life of me i could not identify who their main sponsors were.

    As someone else commented , bike racers are not very polished when it comes to the media, but I am always impressed when the Moto 3 riders are interviewed . Here are these kids and i mean kids, who are struggling with their own native language to get a point across , and doing their best to respond in English . They have figured it out that part of getting a factory GP ride is being able to speak at least passably to the media in English . To me that's impressive and I applaud them for their efforts .

    I have never been a fan of Alberto Puig , but he has done more to help riders than we can imagine with professionalism.

  4. #34
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    I too am a racing junkie, will watch any race if it's on the tube and I'm surfing. Moto is the best to watch IMO. Next the dirt mile, which rarely is on the tube.

    Fav car racing was when we were kids. Every year around Memorial Day, the big question was always something like this, "Will the small block Chevy hold together?, or, How fast will that Granitelli STP turbin be?, or, When will that Rambler six blow up?, or That Lotus will never make to the end, too light, furrin and will be blown into the weeds by the Offies."

    Racing cars today is so regulated that it's lost what we had in the past, honest cheating, which made it interesting cause everybody was doing it. I'd love to see Chevy, Ford, Toyota, field actual sedans off the showroom floor, a few mods, and then race the hell out of'em, the stands would be full to capacity.

    Went to Mich Int. one time, was stunned after the first lap when they got up to speed, it was like a hurricane goin by.

    Forgot to mention the really best racing, sitting out in a corn field on a warm summer evening, popcorn, a beer, half to three quarter mile dirt nicely watered/packed late in the afternoon, kids running around with gummy bears in hand, American flags waving, locals getting suited up, some engines not started since bolted up minutes ago, try to see it at least once a year, somewhere in the great Midwest.

  5. #35
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    Having once been in the business, I love open wheel racing. It started gong downhill in 1978, before I got into it. That was the year Colin Chapman introduced the ground effects car (I'm not counting the "wedge" turbine cars in this) . Jump ahead a few years and they were doing 225+ mph laps at Indy and they were flat the whole way 'round. No lifting for the corners, just steer that baby in, no brakes required except for pit stops. Took a lot of the previously required skill and put it on the shelf. Not that the drivers weren't talented.

    Now, in bike racing, a similar thing has happened and that is GPS-modded traction control which takes into account the specific corner the bike is in, the speed, the gear, the G's, the lean angle, and more. As someone has mentioned, the riders "simply" whack the throttle open and in-electronic-measures-we-trust, they fire out of the corner. Is this a bad thing? Lots of opinions on that.

    If I ruled the world (hey, it might still happen) open wheel race cars get flat bottoms, fat tires, and no traction control. Bikes would lose most of the traction control and the throttle bodies would be controlled by cables attached to the throttle, not servos. In my opinion, the best days of 500GP and MotoGP were '90-'01 and '02-'07, respectively.

    A far as NASCAR is concerned, there would be no 2-door, V8, Toyota Camrys on the grid, cars would have to run intake systems similar to what the "stock" car has (no carbs) and if one manufacturer got a little ahead of their competition well, good on 'em. And any fans who showed up at the track so they could stand behind the broadcast crew with inane signs would be barred from entering. And that's just a start.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC1100S View Post
    Having once been in the business, I love open wheel racing. It started gong downhill in 1978, before I got into it. That was the year Colin Chapman introduced the ground effects car (I'm not counting the "wedge" turbine cars in this) . Jump ahead a few years and they were doing 225+ mph laps at Indy and they were flat the whole way 'round. No lifting for the corners, just steer that baby in, no brakes required except for pit stops. Took a lot of the previously required skill and put it on the shelf. Not that the drivers weren't talented.

    Now, in bike racing, a similar thing has happened and that is GPS-modded traction control which takes into account the specific corner the bike is in, the speed, the gear, the G's, the lean angle, and more. As someone has mentioned, the riders "simply" whack the throttle open and in-electronic-measures-we-trust, they fire out of the corner. Is this a bad thing? Lots of opinions on that.

    If I ruled the world (hey, it might still happen) open wheel race cars get flat bottoms, fat tires, and no traction control. Bikes would lose most of the traction control and the throttle bodies would be controlled by cables attached to the throttle, not servos. In my opinion, the best days of 500GP and MotoGP were '90-'01 and '02-'07, respectively.

    A far as NASCAR is concerned, there would be no 2-door, V8, Toyota Camrys on the grid, cars would have to run intake systems similar to what the "stock" car has (no carbs) and if one manufacturer got a little ahead of their competition well, good on 'em. And any fans who showed up at the track so they could stand behind the broadcast crew with inane signs would be barred from entering. And that's just a start.
    Update: NASCAR no longer uses carbs. No big deal. As far as I'm concerned fuel injectors or carbs are perfectly fine. What ever floats your boat.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by billy walker View Post
    Restrictor plate racing makes for a tiny fraction of the event schedule however.

    True! but lets get rid of the spotters as well...let the driver drive the car. Put rain tires on them and let'em race. OK they'll be slower, so what? they don't need to do a zillion MPH to have a good race.



    How un-American!

    .............



    Way too much crashing going on. It appears to be crashing as opposed to racing. Although very exciting when actually racing.
    Sometimes! seems like they just can't get it together and not bang into each other. When they do get one sorted out...that's exciting to watch.

  8. #38
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    You may have already watched but at Road and Track site check out vids on Clark's Lotus 49 driven by A Rossi at Texas. Gives a clue as to what racing formerly was like. Also some stuff about Indy.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8ninety8 View Post
    You may have already watched but at Road and Track site check out vids on Clark's Lotus 49 driven by A Rossi at Texas. Gives a clue as to what racing formerly was like. Also some stuff about Indy.
    Went there and couldn't find it. If you could provide a link I would be forever in your debt. Thanks!

    EDIT: Nevermind. Used the search function. Duh! Thanks again!

    As a kid, I saw Clark drive that car at the first Canadian Gran Prix at Mosport. I've never forgotten the sounds and the sight. (Clark led the race going away and then it started raining. Water shorted out his battery. DNF)

  10. #40
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    to watch the grip of death on the wheel cutting back an forth, while the right hand is whacking away on a stubby angled shift lever, sitting between two fuel tanks, well, it's simply unimaginable the courage these mid sixties to late seventies drivers had to climb into an Indy or a Grands Prix racer. guess that's why airheads like their old bikes, there's some noise, old tech is whirring away inside an old engine, takes awhile to wind'em out, and if you bolted'em together, some courage to hold'em wide open. Not to mention an airhead is a simple way to get on down the road. I gotta get over to Elkhart when they run the old stuff including the old bikes.

  11. #41
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    F1 and MotoGP are my favorite events to watch on TV, but I go to the NHRA Nationals in Brainerd Mn to get a live experience that can't be beat!
    NASCAR lost me years ago!
    '02 R1150RT

  12. #42
    Still Wondering mika's Avatar
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    +1

    On a rainy afternoon drag racing on TV will send me looking for anything else to watch including CSPAN or a chic flick. Drag racing is something else in person. I love it in the stands or better still in the pits with dirty hands.
    Pass the mustard and UP THE REVOLUTION!

    St. Paul Pioneer Press , Minneapolis Star Tribune

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