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Thread: Seating rings to cylinder R1100RT (break in engine)

  1. #16
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    Really??

    Bon-Ami?

  2. #17
    Registered User dieselyoda's Avatar
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    Yeah, Bon-Ami or this other stuff like AC Delco window cleaner. Blows the carbon and lacquer/glaze out of the cylinders. Not a recommended procedure in any service manual or for that matter, not really recommended by anyone. "Stuff" comes out of the tail pipe pretty hard. At times though, a pretty good solution for oil burners with healthy pistons and cylinder walls.
    If the jugs are finished and the rings are in poor condition, duck and wear a helmet....................
    1997 R1100RT (Restored Basket Case) , 1981 KZ 440 LTD (Restored Basket Case)
    1986 K75S(the beutch), 1993 K1100RS (blown engine), 1997 Chev Short Box (4x4 with an LT1)
    "You can easily judge the character of a man by how he treats those who can do nothing for him."

  3. #18
    Free Wheelin'
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    Bon-Ami

    Bon-Ami??????????????
    I much prefer Ajax!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! FULL THROTTLE!!!! Seat them there rings!! Then rebuild the whole mess.. Right on!!


    Quote Originally Posted by 94aero View Post
    Bon-Ami?

  4. #19
    Registered User dieselyoda's Avatar
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    I love it when folks think they know everything. Ajax is used in gear sets with banana peels. Maybe some folks should recognize that there are sciences way beyond my humble knowledge like Tribology and they have societies like this one. They wear Tilley hats with black socks and Birkenstocks as well.
    I might look like a new member. My first Beemer was a thumper. And it was just a baby when I got it.
    1997 R1100RT (Restored Basket Case) , 1981 KZ 440 LTD (Restored Basket Case)
    1986 K75S(the beutch), 1993 K1100RS (blown engine), 1997 Chev Short Box (4x4 with an LT1)
    "You can easily judge the character of a man by how he treats those who can do nothing for him."

  5. #20
    Nickname: Droid
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    One thing for sure, the cylinder bores on the oilheads are very hard and it takes a while for the rings to break in. I recently saw a R1150 engine taken apart to replace the timing chain, at 225,000 miles. The bores looked great, cross-hatch was easily seen right to the top of the bore, no ridge at the top that could be felt, no piston scuffing (granted, oilhead pistons have very short skirts), ring end gap was still in spec with the original rings. Tough stuff, but they wear realy well.

  6. #21
    Day Dreaming ... happy wanderer's Avatar
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    I'll chime in what some others have mentioned. Not my opinion but the advice of experienced mechanics I trust. First off, 20/50 is the correct viscosity. Take a look at the recent oil test data published in the Owner News and in the airheads thread by Kurt for more info. It's great info. Secondly, break in for oilheads is best done by maniacs. I bought a 96 R1100RT a few years back and was duped into buying a bike that had a cracked cylinder. It had been taken apart and the needed repairs were not done. Instead someone gooped it up with sealant and sold the bike. To me. She started to knock on the way to Red Bluff CA and got so loud I called Ozzies BMW in Chico where the top end got rebuilt. Their advice to me when I left the shop regarding the new rings and break in was to repeatedly red line the bike and constantly vary speed for the first several hundred miles. I headed home down HWY 36 to the coast and did exactly as told and that bike never burned oil after one or two oil changes.

    The guys at Ozzie's have rebuilt countless oilheads and given the fact that they service a ton of CHIP bikes they see every type of failure there is. Low RPM babying of oilhead engines will turn them into oil slurpers. The cylinder coatings are incredibly hard and smooth so you need to really put the spurs to your bike to break it in properly. Believe it.
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
    '81 R80G/S, '82 R100RS, '00 R1100RT

  7. #22
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    Oil useage

    Here is a break-in procedure given to me by an old airhead rider:

    Take cylinders off
    wash them in the sink with dish detergent
    let them air dry
    put a drop of oil on the piston skirts-1 drop per skirt
    put the engine back together, torque to spec and adjust valves
    start engine and get oil pressure up
    Hold tachometer at 6000 rpm for 2 minutes
    shut down and let cool for 24 hours
    re-torque and adjust
    highway run @ 5500 rpm for 30 minutes
    pull over and idle for 2 minutes
    highway run @ 5000 rpm for 30 minutes
    idle for 2 minutes
    Highway run @ 4500 rpm for 30 minutes
    idle 2 minutes
    Highway run @ 4000 for 30 minutes
    Go home, dump oil and change filter
    put in fresh oil and let cool for 24 hours
    re-torque

    Should have seated the rings.

    hope this helps.

    Regards,

    Will

  8. #23
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    here is an exemption for zinc content on 15W and 20 50 oils, and good SN type oils with over 1000 PPM zinc do exist. This was done for some of the older diesel engines. So a modern rated oil "might" be OK. But as stated, the correct oil ratings are available and common so why tempt fate.

    Rod

  9. #24
    Small road corner junkie pffog's Avatar
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    Sign up for a dozen track days, it will make the bike run better and you a better rider!

    That said, it seems hit and miss on how much oil they use, break in doesn't seem to matter. You hear the anal guys that have 3 page spread sheets of time, rpm, gear selection graphed against acceleration curves and throttle angle, heat cycles and ambient temperatures. Then you get the guys that just ride normally, and the ones that rode it like they stole it.

    And in the end, some burn lots, some burn a little, none of it mattered.
    2010 F800GS Full Ohlins package, '04 R1100S Replika
    '01 F650GS Wife's bike
    Maritime Alps and Vosges 2012
    Tuscany and Central Italy 2010

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