Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 42

Thread: Water Water

  1. #1
    143439 bobr9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Clarkesville, GA
    Posts
    143

    Water Water

    Looking for suggestions on what people use to carry water, including how much, for extended summer travel. I am not interested in camelback type solutions, mainly separate container type set up. Thanks..

  2. #2
    God? What god? roborider's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    2,059
    What are your needs? Do you need to carry water to a place, or, are you setting up camp and then making a water run? Platypus makes large, light, collapsible 'bottles' that take up next to no space until you fill them, of course. They are strong and tuff and conform to shape unlike hard plastic.

    Example:

    http://www.rei.com/product/768128/pl...er-tank-15-gal
    Rob C. , Raleigh, NC
    '10 R12RT, R90/6
    2007 CBR600RR & 09 V-Star
    Suzuki DR 350

  3. #3
    Registered User Woodbutcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    194
    A few store bought water bottles. One in the tank bag for easy access and the others in the top box. I'll put them in a flexible cooler with ice if it is really hot out. Get more when i fill the tank. So nothing fancy. If I'm hitting dirt roads though, I will go with a camelback just because I know I will want the water on the move.
    Rusty
    Austin, TX
    Two Wheeled Texans
    2009 R1200GSA

  4. #4
    Kevin kmolldenver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    39
    A suggestion...

    I just came back from a 3,000 mile trip - bike was pretty loaded up. I ran into the water (storage) issue myself. Ended up attaching a couple bicycle water bottle holders with zip ties to the rear seat handles and they worked out pretty well. After the trip, I just cut 'em off. Water bottle holders were about $10.00 ea. from a local bike store. They didn't look too bad either, and they allowed me easy access whenever I wanted, without having to rummage through bags. I backed up the bike bottles with a liquid stash in the sidecase.
    -Kevin
    2005 R1200GS

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    15 M. E. Tampa
    Posts
    382

    thirsssst

    I put a half gallon water container with a long (camelback style) hose on the right passenger peg by running a strap that has velcro on it around the foot peg bracket. The container I have is rectangular and has a nylon jacket around it. I drilled a hole in the top, and stuck the hose down in it. I fill it 1/3 full and freeze it, then fill it up and stick the hose on. The container doesn't move during my rides (cape fear rally, the void rally, et al)

  6. #6
    Registered User argent brick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Wine Country, Northern California
    Posts
    461
    Quote Originally Posted by flars View Post
    I put a half gallon water container with a long (camelback style) hose on the right passenger peg by running a strap that has velcro on it around the foot peg bracket. The container I have is rectangular and has a nylon jacket around it. I drilled a hole in the top, and stuck the hose down in it. I fill it 1/3 full and freeze it, then fill it up and stick the hose on. The container doesn't move during my rides (cape fear rally, the void rally, et al)
    How about some pictures?
    Lynn
    MOA #57883
    Current Ride: 1995 K75 Standard
    Past: 1978 Yamaha XS 750, 1976 BMW R60/6

  7. #7
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    3,406
    The white container in this pic is a 1 gallon rotopax that I use for water, especially when camping in unimproved camp grounds. In addition to this container I have a 2 liter bladder in one of my tank panniers for drinking during the ride.



    I also carry an MSR water filter and a folding bucket. If necessary I'll use that to fill the Rotopax. Usually there are plenty of places to fill it with potable water when on the road. The rotopax sits on my luggage rack where it is easy to get at. There may be a small soft sided cooler -- enough to hold food for a few meals -- on top of the rotopax.


  8. #8
    143439 bobr9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Clarkesville, GA
    Posts
    143
    Quote Originally Posted by RoboRider View Post
    What are your needs?
    I will not be camping, and not off road, so basically I just need to keep hydrated during the day.

  9. #9
    Registered User WalterK75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Mississauga, Ontario
    Posts
    550
    I use a Platypus water bag and keep it in the lowest part of my two chambered tank bag. The Platypus has a long tube with a bite valve on the end. I wrap a velcro "cable tie" around this and attach it to another velcro piece on the outside of the tank bag. When thirsty I slide the bite valve under my helmet and take a drink. With care, this can be done while riding. If I want cold water, I freeze a bit of water in the bag, or break up ice cubes and put them in the bag, and then top up with water just before a ride. I wrap the Platypus in a cloth before putting it in the tank bag so it doesn't sweat on everything. With ice the water stays cool for several hours.
    Walter

    G. K. Chesterton wrote - "The traveller sees what he sees, the tourist sees what he came to see."

  10. #10
    Registered User wvpc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ypsilanti, Michigan
    Posts
    190

    Works great!

    Name:  P1010274b.jpg
Views: 769
Size:  101.2 KB

    While not the most elegant this setup worked very well for 2 up touring. I attached an insulated Platypus 3 litre H2O bag from Amazon via the insulation holder straps to my RT bags. Inexpensive and effective. The straps never came loose during the 7800 mile trip. You can also drink with your full face helmet on. A big plus! I tried a set up to use while in motion but it was too distracting for me.

    I just wish the insulator bag was not black but reflective or light colored to keep the solar gain lower. It did keep our water cold for several hours if you refrigerate the night before or use ice in the bags.
    12 R1200 RT
    83 R100 RT

  11. #11
    Seattle-area Rounder OfficerImpersonator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Just north of Seattle, WA
    Posts
    2,806
    I keep a "Camelbak" type system in my tank bag. The hose snakes out through the zipper opening, and with a 90-degree angle on the bite valve, I don't need to open the flip-face helmet to take a sip of water while cruising the Interstate at 70 mph.

    For water in camp, I take a Nalgene bottle, which can be clipped to almost anything on the bike with a small carabiner. Wide-mouth Nalgene bottles work best, as it's easy to fill, add drink mix, add ice, and clean.

    Some day, I'll mount a fuel and a water "Roto-X-Pak" to my Touratech boxes. http://rotopax.com/1-Gallon-Packs/
    Seattle, WA
    2012 R1200GSA
    2002 R1150RT-P
    1992 K75S sold

  12. #12
    God? What god? roborider's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    2,059
    Quote Originally Posted by bobr9 View Post
    I will not be camping, and not off road, so basically I just need to keep hydrated during the day.
    So why are you not interested in the camelbak? I keep mine in the tankbag like the other poster. Works great filled with ice and water, wrapped in a towel to keep the condensation off the other stuff in the bag.
    Rob C. , Raleigh, NC
    '10 R12RT, R90/6
    2007 CBR600RR & 09 V-Star
    Suzuki DR 350

  13. #13
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    3,406
    A water bladder inside a tank bag works. Camelbak, Platypus, Hydrapack, etc. Or, of you don't mind stopping to take a drink, a simple 1 liter nalgene bottle can fit in some tank bags, too. You can even go fancy and get the cup from Aerostich to go with it.

  14. #14
    143439 bobr9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Clarkesville, GA
    Posts
    143
    Quote Originally Posted by RoboRider View Post
    So why are you not interested in the camelbak?
    Good question. Probably cause I was speaking from ignorance. I was not that familiar with all of the camelbak options, so I thought camelbak only meant the backpack type arrangement and I was not interested in having any gear on my back. Seems like most of what is being talked about is just bottles that you can stick in your tank bag or mount somewhere else on the bike.

  15. #15
    Registered User argent brick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Wine Country, Northern California
    Posts
    461
    I have been using both Klean Kanteen and Nalgene for years with excellent results. You should know, the only problem with the Nalgene Tritan bottles is that even though they are very tough and impact resistant empty, you can crack them if dropped when completely full(so I have been told).

    My daughter uses the Platypus and seems to be very happy with hers. Fairly priced when compared to other brands. They are very similar to the Camelback system.

    Mountain Safety Research (MSR) also has some products that should work well. The Hydromedary Hydration System is my preference. They also make something called DromLite? Bags and just came out with a nice water bottle to compete with Nalgene and KK.

    If you want throw-a-way bottles, Smart Water has a very good bottle that holds up super well. That is my choice for my CERT gear and emergency prep bags. Forget about brands like Arrowhead for durability.

    Please let us know what you end up with.
    Lynn
    MOA #57883
    Current Ride: 1995 K75 Standard
    Past: 1978 Yamaha XS 750, 1976 BMW R60/6

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •