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Thread: Restoring 1978 R100/7

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    Registered User LDB's Avatar
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    Restoring 1978 R100/7

    Ok, not restoring as in perfect show quality but as in putting it back on the road. It's in good cosmetic condition with about 36k miles. I presume it will need tires, battery, fuel lines, brake lines, all oils, all filters. What else?

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    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    - lubed splines (tranny and rear wheel)
    - carbs cleaned and set up/synched
    - brakes adjusted
    - bearings (wheel and swingarm) at least greased
    - control cables?
    - tank cleaned and flushed
    - greased steering stem bearings followed by adjustment

    Then on the second weekend....
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

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    I assume your reference to "all oils" include the fork oil. I also went through the wiring where easily accessible and checked for potential problem areas. Added new brake pads, shoes in the rear.
    And as you are in there and replace the brake lines, give it a new master cylinder kit. Fuel lines are also worth considering.

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    Interesting...That was my intent with my '76 R75/6 (just getting on the road in good working order). One thing just kept leading to another though and now the engine is hanging from a rafter in my shop and the bare frame is on the workbench! Keeping my fingers crossed that I will be on the road before it gets cold again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cseltz View Post
    One thing just kept leading to another though...

    That's a definite danger when you start working on a bike that you aquire to revive. That's why I have three "projects" currently that do not show any progress.
    You have to clearly define for yourself what you are going to do and stop right where you finished these jobs.
    The first priority should be to get the bike back into good running condition. That's it. Not more. No restauration.
    When I got this R100S that had been sitting for 14 years, I had originally planned to pull the cylinder heads to look inside the jugs.
    A friend recommended not to and "just see if it runs".
    It does. Like a scalded cat.

    It still needs a lot of cosmetic improvement but as long as I have that much fun riding it, that has to wait.

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    Registered User krpntr's Avatar
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    The rubber bits will harden and turn brittle over time if not regularly flexed. The push-rod seals may start to leak after a few miles. Also the rear main seal may start to leak after a bit. The lack of miles tells me it spent a lot of time parked. I recommend you don't use synthetic oil till you change the seals.

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    Be sure to take apart the wheels, and check and install (for sure) new seals, but maybe bearings AND make SURE they are greased properly!!

    I learned the hard way - when you buy from a non-mechanic, who only "fixes" things after they break, and didn't have a BMW dedicated repairman to help him get things fixed before they break.

    Check the floats and float needles. I would completely remove the petcocks (with gas tank off) and totally flush out/clean the tank and also be sure to disassemble the petcocks. These items have a nasty habit of collecting dirt. Also, add in-line fuel line filters.

    Be sure to get extra fuses. Mine had someone solder in fuse holders that fit the new automotive style blade fuses. Beats those old ones!

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    Registered User LDB's Avatar
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    Ok, more detail. I bought the bike new and rode it a couple of years. Then kids etc. and it was stored away. I was born with two left thumbs so I don't do any of the work. I just want to know what all to ask for when I get the bike to a shop. I definitely don't want the expense of a concours restoration, but I do want to be sure everything is done to make it roadworthy and as close to bulletproof as possible.

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    Registered User dmftoy1's Avatar
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    Just did a 74 R90/6 - plan on replacing anything made out of rubber . . At least that was my experience, I've done all the seals but the front one under the timing cover. I did all the cables too but could've done that selectively. Fwiw

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    Registered User LDB's Avatar
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    I sort of figured everything made of rubber gets replaced and anything lubricated whether by oil, grease or whatever gets cleaned and new oil/grease/whatever. New tires and a battery as well of course. I just wasn't sure if there might be other things I should do like all new light bulbs, just as one example, or whatever.

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    Registered User krpntr's Avatar
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    If you are not going to do the work yourself, be sure you take it to a mechanic that specializes in air-heads. He will know all the questions and most of the answers. But as long as your two thumbs work, I am sure you can learn to do the work yourself if you take your time. Ask lots of questions. Around here a mechanic costs about $90.per hr. and they are worth every penny, but IMHO working on your own bike is where half the pleasure of the machine lies. Glad to hear you are talking about an old bike you bought new. Getting it back on the road will feel good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Krpntr View Post
    , be sure you take it to a mechanic that specializes in air-heads. .
    This may be the real challenge. As with all other motorcycle dealerships, BMW service dealers often refuse to work on anything old(er). They just don't have the mechanics with the skills anymore and the availability of parts through their official channels is iffy.

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    Getting it done

    You didn't mention where you live. Most of us can probably direct you to an Airhead specialist in your area. There's also a list of independent shops on the IBMWR site.
    Boxerbruce

  14. #14
    Registered User LDB's Avatar
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    I didn't realize I hadn't updated. I'm in Houston. I've heard a lot of good things about MPH and Gulf Coast in this area. I could probably figure it all out and do it all in only 3 or 4 or maybe 5 times as long as it will take a professional. I don't fix my own teeth or take out my own tonsils either. Better to have it all done by those who are best at it, whatever "it" may be.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LDB View Post
    . I don't fix my own teeth or take out my own tonsils either. Better to have it all done by those who are best at it, whatever "it" may be.
    Working on Airheads doesn't require a MTI diploma and it is actually a lot of fun for a somewhat mechanically inclined person. Besides, you will develop a strong relationship to your bike.
    After all, you may be better than some who claim they are "the best at it"

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