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Thread: 86 R80RT Spark Plug Issue

  1. #1
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    86 R80RT Spark Plug Issue

    Your thougths on to USE or NOT TO USE antiseize compound when installing new plugs?

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    Registered User toooldtocare's Avatar
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    Use very little, and start back from the tip to prevent shorting the plug out. I also torque by feel, tightening enough to slightly crush the washer. I never re-use a washer either, but would rather install a new plug.

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    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

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    Tradeoff

    Everything is a tradeoff.

    Many years ago, I heard people say NOT to use anti-seize on plugs as it would inhibit the transfer of heat from the plug to the surrounding head.

    But, I for one, would rather have the transfer problem (IF it in fact really does exist) than to have dry threads in an aluminum head.

    I compensation would be, in my view, to use 1 step slightly colder plug. For example, using an NGK BP7ES instead of a BP6ES.

    When at the Honda shop, our advice generally was to try to get as cold a plug as would run the motorcycle. This could be achieved by using a plug for a while and then inspecting to see just how it is burning and leave all other factors the same during the testing period.

    Everyone has his/her own opinion.

    Mine is, is to use anti-seize.

  5. #5
    MOA #24991 Pauls1150's Avatar
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    Maybe moot by now, but:
    I've always firmly believed that filling the voids between the threads with a small quantity of metallic goop must IMPROVE the heat transfer.

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    Well, I certainly open a can-of-worms on the Anti-Seize Compound issues. Interesting! Lots of comments from veteran Bikers and experiences mechanics. Agree with one subject - I never torque down a spark plug. Finger tight...1/2 turn or so and call it a day. No problems in 40 years and ten plus bikes. As far as the Anti-Seize Compound, hmmmmm, think I will apply a slight and very light coat of graphic grease. Only enough where one might say, "Hey- that's not enough"! and call it a day.

    Thanks Good Stuff:

    clap

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemike1 View Post
    Your thougths on to USE or NOT TO USE antiseize compound when installing new plugs?
    My Father retired as the Officer in charge of maintenance for the Largest Air Force Base in the world. He tool care of a lot of aircraft costing in the 100's of millions of dollars per plane.

    Luckily I was able to siphon off a small part of his knowledge before he moved on to the next phase...

    He taught me to anti-seize different metals, among other things. Basically putting a steel plug in an aluminum head without it is foolish, it was in his opinion and it is in mine.

    Why wouldn't someone do it?

    What's the downside?

    Show me all the burnt up heads from lack of heat transfer between the plug and the head. I wanna see all those pictures! Ive been using AS on my plugs for 35 years, why haven't mine blown up?



    I have personally experienced pulling plugs out and the threads are still on the plug. That's Fo' Real Playa! It happens a lot.

    The worse thing that can happen to plugs with anti seize are that you over torque, that's your fault.

    They get loose, that's your fault too, just tighten them down a little and go on with your life, threads intact.

    I antiseize the first few threads. Tighten down till the crush washer feels flat, it's a feel thing. Never had a problem.

    I did have issues before I used AS.

    Always on Lug Nuts as well.

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    Appreciate your comment from your knowledge gained. Sounds like solid advice and one that would be hard to go against. Thanks

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    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    Isn't everything our fault! One can strip the threads with or without antiseize. It comes down to the individual owner and their skills. I personally like to use a small amount. But using it is another variable that needs to be remembered. If you're the only maintainer, then it's not really a problem...or shouldn't be. I believe I stated on another similar thread something that Tom Cutter wrote about that he witnessed in his racing series. Another competitor had the spark plug snapped off in the head because one person used antiseize on the threads and another person, not knowing that, used the "no antiseize" setting on the torque wrench. Ouch! The competitor got things repaired but missed sufficient practice time such that it likely cost him a race win.
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 20774 View Post
    Isn't everything our fault! One can strip the threads with or without antiseize. It comes down to the individual owner and their skills.
    Heh! Yeah mostly.

    But there is a distinction between "stripped" and galling or seizing.

    I kinda think of stripped as what I did before I had the "feel" and I would say it can still happen occasionally. Mostly from non-use of torque wrenches. I associate stripped with abuse for the "most" part.

    Galling and seizing is just one of those things, like s*it happens. That happens to the virginal and innocent! Anti seize can prevent that.

    I think the only people who could conceivably see the heat transfer inhibition would be some one who routinely runs their engine for long periods outside the normal thermal limits, ie racers. The kinda folks who blow up engines as part of their normal work day. Maybe one of them claimed antiseize killed his engine once and now that boogeyman haunts the anti seize threads.

  11. #11
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    Do like the people that invented spark plugs and still make them (Bosch) say: don't use it.
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  12. #12
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemike1 View Post
    Your thoughts on to USE or NOT TO USE antiseize compound when installing new plugs?
    I use anti-seize compound on the spark plug threads on all my vehicles.

    Almost 39 years and many vehicles later, not a single thread damaged. (except when I used a sub standard product like the Gunson Colortune)

    Spark plug threads being "plated" diminished the need for anti-seize compound, but I still choose to use it.

    BTW, proper spark plug torque is the most critical factor in heat transfer.

  13. #13
    Registered User amiles's Avatar
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    I confess, I use Antisieze on my plugs. I'm the only one to maintain them so no one is fooled about torque. I find it hard to believe that anyone worth trusting this job to would not see and smell the stuff. If they don't know what AS is and check for it why would you trust them with your machine? I am also reluctant to remove the plugs when Hot as I feel this adds a bit more risk to the threads. A burnt hand is best avoided as well.

    Just to contradict myself, IMHO the shorter period a time that the dissimilar metals are engaged, the less AS is needed. I pull my plugs from time to time to check them, they are never put in and untouched for an extended period of time.

  14. #14
    Sir Darby Darryl Cainey's Avatar
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    Had the 77RS 26 years, one set of new NGK Plugs at the start of each riding season.

    516,000 miles with a little anti-seize on every plug.

    No stripped threads yet!

    Your call!
    Ambassador BMW MOA Ontario Canada
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    1977 R100RS, (Retired) 1993 R100GS (just getting started)

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