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Thread: Never Been In The Shop

  1. #1
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    Never Been In The Shop

    Buying a really nice condition 2000 R1100R this week that has been owner serviced. It has 60K miles and I'm thinking probably should go into
    the shop for at least an alternator belt ?
    Can you think of anything else of a service issue that should be checked on a bike of this milage ?

  2. #2
    rabid reader dbrick's Avatar
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    I think it'd depend on what "owner serviced" means. The PO might have been a competent shade-tree mechanic who did the various service jobs called for in the maintenance schedule at the appropriate times. OTOH, the PO might have been ham-handed or avoidant, an owner who approached preventative maintenance and repair in a less responsible fashion. That the bike looks nice suggests the former, but does not preclude the latter.

    If I were buying, I'd look carefully at the PO and his or her records and documents. If I trusted that everything was done as it was supposed to, then I'd just ride it. If I thought otherwise, I'd probably start with doing everything, so I'd know maintenance was up-to-date.
    David Brick
    Santa Cruz CA
    2007 R1200R

  3. #3
    . AntonLargiader's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DougRH View Post
    Buying a really nice condition 2000 R1100R this week that has been owner serviced. It has 60K miles and I'm thinking probably should go into
    the shop for at least an alternator belt ?
    Can you think of anything else of a service issue that should be checked on a bike of this milage ?
    Check the dates stamped on the alternator belt and fuel filter. If they are original, do everything the bike could possibly need and treat 60k as your new starting point. If they have reasonable dates on them, do the 60k service if needed and give the bike a good looking over and then go riding.

    I suspect most bikes get the bulk of their miles early on, so on a 60k miles 2000 model, I would think that a 2002 or 2003 filter would have happened at 24k, and 2008 would be 48k. Belts were initially every 36k and went to 24k, so it's harder to estimate but either way, if it's original then it was never changed when specified.

    'Master mechanic owner maintained" can mean that the oils and valve clearances were over-maintained (but the crush washers are five molecules thick) and everything else (belt, filters, brake fluid, pivot bearings, hoses, forks, stands, rubber bits) was totally ignored. I've seen it.

    So, pull the front cover and let us know what date is stamped on the belt. It's harder to see the fuel filter date but you should look at that some time when the tank is empty.
    Anton Largiader 72724
    largiader.com bmwra.org

  4. #4
    Registered User roger 04 rt's Avatar
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    +1 to the previous.

    Four relatively hidden conditions are: cracked hoses inside the tank that fail without warning; very worn transmission input splines that give some warning; imbalanced fuel injectors that lead to surging that can't be balanced out with a throttle body balance, and a tired O2 sensor.

    The dealer should be able to tell you about the hoses and input splines (looking at clutch plate movement viewed through the starter opening). For the injectors run one tank fuel with the recommended dosage of Techron Concentrate, or later consider having them cleaned and flow tested. For the O2 sensor, you probably need a friend with a GS-911, I don't know how the dealer would evaluate that.

    I'd also check to make sure that the correct Coding Plug is installed in the electrical box.

    RB

  5. #5
    Macrunch MCrenshaw's Avatar
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    My wife rides a '97 R1100R. The alternator belt is a good beginning. You should definitely consider replacing the brake lines as they are probably at the end of their life. Spiegler has what you need for a little of $200. It's an easy job to replace them. How about the brake pads. Fuel hoses and filters are also a good idea. You might do a careful check of the final drive, does it have any slop or can you hear any unusual noises when you rotate the rear tire? They are very good bikes and with the proper service should last quite a few more miles. My wife won't trade hers or consider anything else.

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