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Thread: Utah 1088

  1. #31
    Registered User einnar's Avatar
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    I went, I read, I'm hooked.


    - Some say the glass is half empty, some say the glass is half full, I say, are you going to drink that? - Lisa Clayman
    - A bank is a place where they lend you an umbrella in fair weather and ask for it back when it begins to rain. --Robert Frost

  2. #32
    Jackie
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    Smile Utah 1088

    BG: Oh my starzzz! I rode the Utah 1088 and I never saw you! How could that be??? Steve commented during the banquet how you went back to the dealer and took care of business, then went out and finished the ride. Impressive. I don't know if MC rallyin' is anything like endurance riding with horses, but their motto is: "to finish is to win". Good job!

    Jackie
    '99 glacier green RT GiGi aka "PSYCHL"
    PDX
    well behaved women rarely make history...
    Blue Knights Oregon I, IBA #16940

  3. #33
    On Tour REBECCAV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackie
    BG: Oh my starzzz! I rode the Utah 1088 and I never saw you!
    I remember seeing you and your husband ride in at the finish line and I saw you going up to pick out the riding jacket that you won. IIRC you finished around 30th. Congrats on a GREAT ride. I'll make sure to say hello the next time I see your gorgeous green RT!
    Even the AGATT/beemer Gals glowed like madonna space angels -redclfco

  4. #34
    Out Ridin' JOECUBANA's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Great Job!

    Quote Originally Posted by boxergrrlie
    I finished fourth from the bottom (47th I think) with around 14,000 points and 1181 miles. The winner had around 50,000 points and 1723 miles.
    Hey Rebecca....

    Great job....sounds like your training for the IB is going well....

    Remember, it's not where you finished that counts, but rather that you had the courage to start.

    JC
    Joe Chriest
    2003 R1150GS; 2006 Piaggio Fly 150
    "I'm not as good as I once was, but I'm as good once, as I ever was"

  5. #35
    Registered User einnar's Avatar
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    I checked out the buffalo site again, and the utah 1088 site again, and am looking for a better site, with a lot more explanation as to what this kind of ride is. Anyone got any links?

    I'm assuming it's a lot like orienteering. In that, you get a bunch of coordinates, and have to plan a route on a mil-spec UTM map (taking terrain into account). When/if you find the markers at the proscribed destinations, you write down the number on the marker to prove you were there, and move out to the next spot. Orienteering, the way I did it, was mostly hiking through the woods, or open ground. (We didn't use GPS, either.. just a map, a compass, and a pace count.) Doing it on a motorcycle sounds a LOT more fun.

    How do you prove you were somewhere? I saw a mention of writing down what's written on a statue/bell/etc, or a picture of your bike/rider number in front of whatever is mentioned (polaroid, so I have to get another camera?)

    How many pictures do you normally have to take? How many stops are normal for a rally like this? Is it a lot of on and off the bike, a lot of road miles, etc? I understand you have to be back in X hours, with Y miles under your belt, but the rest of the details are 'fuzzy'.

    I really enjoyed orienteering when I did it, and am hoping this is similar, in that it's an adventure to find the locations, you pick your route, etc..

    Any of you pros want to shed some light for a n00b ?

    (Thanks in advance)

    - Some say the glass is half empty, some say the glass is half full, I say, are you going to drink that? - Lisa Clayman
    - A bank is a place where they lend you an umbrella in fair weather and ask for it back when it begins to rain. --Robert Frost

  6. #36
    Slowpoke & Proud of It! BRADFORDBENN's Avatar
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    Well, I am still a newbie, but we all began somewhere... so here is what I figured out so far from my vast experience of one (http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/showthread.php?t=6396)

    Quote Originally Posted by einnar
    I checked out the buffalo site again, and the utah 1088 site again, and am looking for a better site, with a lot more explanation as to what this kind of ride is. Anyone got any links?
    You want want to check out the Minuteman site at http://www.minuteman1000.com/info.htm

    I'm assuming it's a lot like orienteering. In that, you get a bunch of coordinates, and have to plan a route on a mil-spec UTM map (taking terrain into account). When/if you find the markers at the proscribed destinations, you write down the number on the marker to prove you were there, and move out to the next spot. Orienteering, the way I did it, was mostly hiking through the woods, or open ground. (We didn't use GPS, either.. just a map, a compass, and a pace count.) Doing it on a motorcycle sounds a LOT more fun.
    Close, it is a lot of fun though. What happens is that the Rally Master put together a list of bonus options and assigns points and values to them. You then have to figure out what is the most effecient and point gathering way to get around them and collect the points. For instance the Rider Package/Bonus (Bonii) List for the Bonzai was about 15 pages, there is no way you could get to all of them. So what you would do is figure out the best way to get as many points as possible. And everyone solved the puzzle a little differently.

    How do you prove you were somewhere? I saw a mention of writing down what's written on a statue/bell/etc, or a picture of your bike/rider number in front of whatever is mentioned (polaroid, so I have to get another camera?)
    Take a look at this sample Bonii List from the 1999 Irob Butt Rally http://www.ironbuttrally.com/IBR/2003.cfm?DocID=2 - don't let it scare you, but try to figure out the best way to go and collect the points. Some times you need to purchase something, other times you take a picture. I personally did the Picture Bonuses on the last one and a few question ones. The key is to read the directions carefully. The reason I like the picture bonii is that I would always take 2 pictures, one for the Rally Master and one for me to keep.

    How many pictures do you normally have to take? How many stops are normal for a rally like this? Is it a lot of on and off the bike, a lot of road miles, etc? I understand you have to be back in X hours, with Y miles under your belt, but the rest of the details are 'fuzzy'.
    You decide a lot of this, some people go for the Big Bonus and skip the small ones, other people go for lots of small ones Either way it is fun.

    The big goal I would tell you to go in with, just to finish. At the Bonzai people were time barred by as little as 17 seconds. There is a reason the Rally Master is also known as the Rally Bastard. But hey the rules clearly state what time to be back by and the clock was available all morning before leaving to set your watch.
    -=Brad

    It isn't what you ride, it is if you ride

  7. #37
    Registered User gsanderson's Avatar
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    Thumbs up


  8. #38
    Registered User einnar's Avatar
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    Bradford, I've poured over the links you sent me, and even went and found a few more. This sounds like fun! Read the Minuteman1k rules from start to finish, as well as the sample list of towns on the list that bonus' (bonii?) might be found in. Found a site with some 'riders stories' too. Interesting reading! From the perspective of a rider that's already done one (or more?), is there anything else you or anyone else might like to add? I don't know how competitive I would be doing this, as I'm more geared toward fun and personal accomplishment, but still... Sounds like a big 'I wanna try one' at this point. Should I start out with a 500, or jump right into a 1k? I've never done 1000 miles in a day before (officially, or that I'm fully aware of). I'm sure it takes more fortitude and endurance than I'm imagining.

    As I read more about this, and other events that people have participated in, I get more respect for those that have done them. Kind of an eye opener, if you will.

    Thanks for the info and links Bradford, and congrats Boxergirrlie!

    - Some say the glass is half empty, some say the glass is half full, I say, are you going to drink that? - Lisa Clayman
    - A bank is a place where they lend you an umbrella in fair weather and ask for it back when it begins to rain. --Robert Frost

  9. #39
    Slowpoke & Proud of It! BRADFORDBENN's Avatar
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    Here is what I learned along the way...

    1) The goal is to finish - safely
    2) The second goal is to pick up bonii along the way
    3) The third goal, have fun.

    Now in terms of mileage, that depends on how you want to ride. The Buffalo Run is time based, so I would start with the 12 hour event. There are mileage ones as well, but that is up to you. Plus you can get Bonus for mileage, but there can also be mileage that will get you DNF'ed (Did Not Finished) if you ride too many too fast.

    Oh yeah, we can always talk about this stuff at Lima.
    -=Brad

    It isn't what you ride, it is if you ride

  10. #40
    Registered User einnar's Avatar
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    But.. .but...but... that's 2 weeks away!!!!!

    Okay, over alcohol, preferrably.

    - Some say the glass is half empty, some say the glass is half full, I say, are you going to drink that? - Lisa Clayman
    - A bank is a place where they lend you an umbrella in fair weather and ask for it back when it begins to rain. --Robert Frost

  11. #41
    2006 K1200GT, 1986 K100 merrittgene's Avatar
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    Opinions

    Opinions are like elbows; everyone has two and it hurts like hell when you bump them into things. (Wait, that's not right.)

    Anyway, I've done three endurance rallies so far: Green Mountain 400 (10 hour), Bonzai (12 hour), and Minuteman 1000 (24 hour), and in that order. I don't know what it would have been like to do the 24 hour first. I enjoyed all three, and I did them as they became available to me, as opposed to purposing starting on the shorter events.

    I will say this, though, the 24 hour event was a lot more demanding. I was handicapped somewhat by needing to travel 1200 miles to get to the starting gate, so even with a full day of leisure before the start, I was still on a sleep deficit. And, these events require route planning, so I traded sleep for that. In the end, 22 hours of riding (2 hours of rest for points) was somewhere near my limit that day.

    So, I guess I'm saying, if you're prepared (i.e. rested and mentally ready) for a longer event, then go for it. But, if the next rally that interests you is a 10 hour rally, then go for that. Either way, it's a lot of fun.

    -

    Here's what I love about endurance rallies: They are a lot like camping rallies (top quality people, friendly tire-kicking sessions, great camaraderie) AND the rally master & staff find interesting places to send you. So, I like to think of the Minuteman as "a New Englander's view of New England". I could have ridden to Massachusetts on my own, and hunted around for roads and landmarks without an underlying contest, but it wouldn't have been half as fun, and I wouldn't have seen as many cool things.

    And, I like that everyone does the event a little differently...it makes for more interesting conversation later. "Did you find this? Dang, I missed that. Man, that was neat. Etc."

    So, find a rally and try it out. You'll be an awkward newbie for about 0.57 seconds, and then you'll make a bunch of new friends and start having fun.

    (I suppose I could have spawned a new thread for this. Oops.)
    Gene Merritt - Ames, IA - BMWMOA#111610 - IBA#21886 - Rounder #26 - Webmeister, Bahnsturmers
    ---- 1986 K100 ---- 2006 K1200GT ---- 2001 F650GSD ----

  12. #42
    Registered User ian408's Avatar
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    Hiya BG!

    Nice report. I don't know how I missed this one.

    One of these days, I will have to do something like this...

    Ian

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