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Thread: 2012 RT 6K Service Experience

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  1. #1
    Registered User liv2ride's Avatar
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    2012 RT 6K Service Experience

    Bought the RT, my first BMW, back in July 2012. Prior to the purchase I performed extensive research to include renting the bike to make certain this was the bike for me. Prior to the purchase I determined that I would be performing all routine service not just to save money but to also bond with the bike.

    Yesterday I began the journey of performing the 6k maintenance, all but the throttle body sync. I need something to help lock the throttle position to simplify this process and haven't yet figured this out. I do have the harmonizer for when I do this service.

    I did accomplish the following:

    - FD fluid change, managed to accomplish without wheel removal or exhaust repositioning. I haven't measure the amount taken out yet but intend to do so. Fluid was very dirty and had grease in the drain plug but didn't see any "fuzz" or anything unusual. This fluid was not changed at the 600 mile check, the sheet the dealer used from that months DVD did not call for it.

    - Transmission fluid change.

    - Engine oil filter and fluid change.

    - Valve check (Left Intake: .18/.18, Left Exhaust: .35/.35, Right Intake: .20/.20, Right Exhaust: .36/.36). These measurements are better than anticipated and were left alone.

    Now the question. What is the best process to perform this maintenance? It appears I spent an extraordinary amount of time accomplishing the above. There must be a proven sequence to ensure efficiency with accomplishing these routine maintenance tasks. Keep in mind; I don't have access to a bike lift so I spent a good amount of time on the ground.

    Also, if there are any suggestions on keeping the throttle steady while performing the sync maintenance that would be helpful as well.

    Loving this bike more each day.

    Thanks in advance.

    Scot

  2. #2
    Registered User lkraus's Avatar
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    I've not felt a need for any sort of throttle positioner or lock for this procedure. You only need to check at about 1500-1800 rpm, just off idle. Wider throttle openings are less sensitive to throttle opening differences than small ones - if it is balanced off idle it will be balanced at all other positions. I check the existing balance, and then, if needed, loosen the cable lock nut on the right side, adjust with one hand while operating the throttle with the other. Retighten the lock nut and re-check the balance.
    Larry
    2006 R1200RT

  3. #3
    Registered User liv2ride's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lkraus View Post
    I've not felt a need for any sort of throttle positioner or lock for this procedure. You only need to check at about 1500-1800 rpm, just off idle. Wider throttle openings are less sensitive to throttle opening differences than small ones - if it is balanced off idle it will be balanced at all other positions. I check the existing balance, and then, if needed, loosen the cable lock nut on the right side, adjust with one hand while operating the throttle with the other. Retighten the lock nut and re-check the balance.
    I actually thought about doing it this way before I buttoned her back up but then decided to seek guidance on best practice. Isn't it best if you tighten the locknut while the throttle is locked at the desired check RPM? From what I understand tightening the locknut can affect the end adjustment.

    I am not in a rush since the bike idles fine and also seems to run smoothly at all throttle positions. I guess I will give this technique a shot next weekend.

    Billy,

    Good point. I am only wondering what the sequence is that others have adopted to make the best use of time.

    Thanks.

    Scot

  4. #4
    BMW Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by liv2ride View Post
    I actually thought about doing it this way before I buttoned her back up but then decided to seek guidance on best practice. Isn't it best if you tighten the locknut while the throttle is locked at the desired check RPM? From what I understand tightening the locknut can affect the end adjustment.

    I am not in a rush since the bike idles fine and also seems to run smoothly at all throttle positions. I guess I will give this technique a shot next weekend.

    Billy,

    Good point. I am only wondering what the sequence is that others have adopted to make the best use of time.

    Thanks.

    Scot
    Different tech's will handle the exact same bike differently but most would drop all fluids as one of the first things done as you can continue on with other work while the fluids drain.

  5. #5
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by billy walker View Post
    Different tech's will handle the exact same bike differently but most would drop all fluids as one of the first things done as you can continue on with other work while the fluids drain.
    When working on my bikes I do the exact opposite. I do all of the cold stuff (valves, tire pressure, brake bleed if needed, various inspections, etc.) then take a test ride to get the bike to FULL operating temp. Back in the garage I check/adjust throttle bodies at operating temp. Then, while the bike is still warm, I drain fluids. Tranny and FD fluids are changed every 12K (about once a year, maybe a little longer). Lastly I take a final test ride after everything is buttoned up.

    It is probably slightly slower the way I do it. That's OK. I'm not trying to make a buck and I (mostly) enjoy working on my bike. The key is having another bike to ride should the service take longer than planned.

  6. #6
    Droptine1968
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    Live2ride,
    How did you refill the final drive without removing the rear wheel?
    2005 R1200RT

  7. #7
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by liv2ride View Post
    I actually thought about doing it this way before I buttoned her back up but then decided to seek guidance on best practice. Isn't it best if you tighten the locknut while the throttle is locked at the desired check RPM? From what I understand tightening the locknut can affect the end adjustment.

    I am not in a rush since the bike idles fine and also seems to run smoothly at all throttle positions. I guess I will give this technique a shot next weekend.
    While I haven't done a CamHead (the OHC model) - on my '07 Hexhead, I finally had to tweak the throttle balance. This was the first time in 64,000 miles (despite my writing the TB balance for the DIY - it actually didn't NEED it when I did the writeup..)

    If the valves are adjusted correctly (and mine haven't changed now for the past 18,000 miles) - the throttle balance generally seems to remain dead-nutz on. I suspect the reason I needed to do it this time was about a week ago I removed the left/port side throttle-body in order to gain clearance to the port side timing chain tensioner. Mine had gotten noisy at startup, and I replaced it (and the noise went away.) Doing so requires R&R of the throttle-body for clearance. I suspect I probably upset something when doing the R&R. It wasn't off much (about 2 divisions at max sensitivity on my TwinMax, which is VERY sensitive), but enough that I could feel it in the bars at around 3,700-4,000 RPM. A small adjustment to the right (starboard) side cable and all is well again.

    As far as your question on the order to do things, I generally do my service in this order:

    Engine -
    1 - Valve adjustment, and plug replacement (if needed)
    2 - If alternator belt is due - do it before putting the plugs back in
    3 - Engine oil change
    4 - Fully warm engine and check throttle balance - do readout of all modules on the bike with GS-911, and use GS-911 to ZERO the idle steppers (and if you like to - to lock them for the throttle-balance, IMHO not really needed.)

    Transmission -
    1 - If required - drain and refill while it's warm from the engine service.

    Rear drive
    1 - If required - drain and refill

    Brake fluids
    - Due every 24 months starting from production date. FLUSH (do NOT drain) with DOT4

    Thats pretty much is the order I'll do it in.

    I may do the rear drive first (I did for the 64k service I just completed) because it doesn't have to be hot to do, In the case of this service, I did rear-drive first, went for a ride for a day, then did the transmission while it was still warm from the ride, then finally did the engine service a few days later after enjoying some more riding. Being retired lets me schedule it as I want to - so this made for a very relaxed service interspersed with rides just because I could.

    On the transmission - remember to always loosen the filler plug before pulling the drain plug.

    32K intervals for me are the "Service-II" - where I do ALL the fluids, the plugs and the alternator belt. On this service I also did the 24 month brake fluid flush (a bit early) since I was replacing the rear rotor (and pads) which was under spec. I'm planning on some long rides this summer, and wanted to get everything I could out of the way so I don't have to service it (besides perhaps an oil change) during the rides.
    Last edited by deilenberger; 04-23-2013 at 03:45 PM.
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders New Sweden BMW Riders
    '07 R1200R (current ride) and some bimmers.. and a Porsche

  8. #8
    BMW Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by liv2ride View Post
    ......................
    Now the question. What is the best process to perform this maintenance? It appears I spent an extraordinary amount of time accomplishing the above. There must be a proven sequence to ensure efficiency with accomplishing these routine maintenance tasks. Keep in mind; I don't have access to a bike lift so I spent a good amount of time on the ground..............
    Given the fact you will probably not be doing these services often enough to possibly ever be efficient don't worry about it from that point of view. Over the course of time you will become more knowledgable and faster however. Just enjoy the time doing something you love and knowing you're doing it with quality.

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