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Thread: Discount BMW Parts - from a BMW Dealer

  1. #31
    Old man in the mountains osbornk's Avatar
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    When I lived in Lynchburg, Va., I shopped at Hammersley and I ordered parts from them after I moved away. They were small dealership in the back of a BMW, Mercedes, etc. dealership. Since they were a small dealership in a small community, I think they survived by selling parts at a discount throughout the country. They made less profit on the parts they sold at a discount but it was profit and sales they would not have had if they had only sold at MSRP.

    Selling parts is no different than selling anything else. Your business model can be selling fewer goods at a higher profit per unit or selling more goods at a lower profit per unit. As we learned in Econ. 101, the law of diminishing returns is a delicate balance.
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  2. #32
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by billy walker View Post
    Sounds good in theory but let me ask this question. Will the big corporation take care of its customers any better than the franchise? We are all well aware of how difficult and impersonal large corporations can be. And the lack of concern shown by so many of its employees. These very same things can and do exist at the smaller levels as well but my hunch is things would get worse rather than better. I really don't know however.

    I prefer to deal local and keep the money in the local economy if possible. But the local economy then has the obligation to take care of me as a customer should be taken care of. I am not offended by those who disagree however.
    In my experience, customer relations are largely a function of the corporation/national distributor policies. I've seen this with several multi-line car dealerships where the customer service varied wildly based on the brand. IMHO, some companies (Toyota & Honda, in my experience) enforce a level of customer service to insure brand satisfaction while the "Big Three & others" operated on the basis of "screw you, you'll get what we give you".

    I like the idea of dealing local, but it's challenging to find those sources.
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  3. #33
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by osbornk View Post
    Selling parts is no different than selling anything else. Your business model can be selling fewer goods at a higher profit per unit or selling more goods at a lower profit per unit. As we learned in Econ. 101, the law of diminishing returns is a delicate balance.
    Balancing volume and margin to achieve necessary revenue has nothing to do with the law of diminishing returns........
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  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    In my experience, customer relations are largely a function of the corporation/national distributor policies. I've seen this with several multi-line car dealerships where the customer service varied wildly based on the brand. IMHO, some companies (Toyota & Honda, in my experience) enforce a level of customer service to insure brand satisfaction while the "Big Three & others" operated on the basis of "screw you, you'll get what we give you".

    I like the idea of dealing local, but it's challenging to find those sources.
    I have wondered about the OP's concept in general. Could the equivalent of Starbucks in the motorcycle and automotive world work well. I am personally not aware of no negotiation pricing being successful anywhere. Is anybody aware of someone using that system and it has flourished over the course of time? It would be interesting to know.

    Given the complexities and the skill sets required in the business and the need to understand local markets and the vehicles that might sell well within those markets I am not confident the concept would fly. That could be my own inability to make something of that nature successful and/or my fear of trying the concept out for a couple year period to determine the results. Interesting concept but I have no real confidence of where it would lead.

    You're 100% correct when you state local sources can be challenging and that is true of all business types not just motorcycles. The same truth exists when dealing with national concerns as well. IMO businesses in general need to step up to the plate and act responsibly in their actions with both customers and employees. Someone needs to be first to act. It needs to be the folks in business. At that point customers would theoretically act less harshly towards every dealer in general.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    In my experience, customer relations are largely a function of the corporation/national distributor policies. I've seen this with several multi-line car dealerships where the customer service varied wildly based on the brand. IMHO, some companies (Toyota & Honda, in my experience) enforce a level of customer service to insure brand satisfaction while the "Big Three & others" operated on the basis of "screw you, you'll get what we give you".

    I like the idea of dealing local, but it's challenging to find those sources.
    I have wondered about the OP's concept in general. Could the equivalent of Starbucks in the motorcycle and automotive world work well. I am personally not aware of no negotiation pricing being successful anywhere. Is anybody aware of someone using that system and it has flourished over the course of time? It would be interesting to know.

    Given the complexities and the skill sets required in the business and the need to understand local markets and the vehicles that might sell well within those markets I am not confident the concept would fly. That could be my own inability to make something of that nature successful and/or my fear of trying the concept out for a couple year period to determine the results. Interesting concept but I have no real confidence of where it would lead.

    You're 100% correct when you state local sources can be challenging and that is true of all business types not just motorcycles. The same truth exists when dealing with national concerns as well. IMO businesses in general need to step up to the plate and act responsibly in their actions with both customers and employees. Someone needs to be first to act. It needs to be the folks in business. At that point customers would theoretically act less harshly towards every dealer in general. Selling 40 cent gaskets for $1 or $2 really has nothing to do with the overall picture. It goes well, well beyond that.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider View Post
    But you do seem to take the side of the dealer, shop or business owner.
    I gave this comment a lot of consideration and you're right, I have taken what appears to be the dealers side. Did you stop to think that because you are presenting a biased, one-sided opinion supported with no real P&L facts somebody might need to present an opposing view point?

  7. #37
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    I'm still waiting to find out where the discounted parts can be had?
    14 R1200GSA, 93 R100R. No car is as fun to drive as any motorcycle is to ride.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by milo View Post
    I'm still waiting to find out where the discounted parts can be had?
    We have really diverged from that haven't we? Please accept my apologies as I have been part of the problem. I'm unable to answer your question I'm sorry to say.

  9. #39
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    The very best place to buy parts altogether is Carolina Euro (www.carolinaeuro.com). They have a parts fiche online that you can actually order from. You don't have to call anybody if you choose not to. However its been my experience that if you call and them and tell them what you need and ask for the best price they will discount it for you. Most dealers can't advertise a discount price without consequences from BMW corp. I've done business with all the major players in the BMW world on bikes and parts but Carolina Euro has always been the best.

  10. #40
    Bluenoser
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    Another place to price check with is Motobins in the UK. They have a web page online parts for airheads & oilheads etc and very good to deal with. They have always provided me with exceptional service, even going so far as to replace several items that were lost in shipping with no questions asked.
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  11. #41
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by billy walker View Post
    I have wondered about the OP's concept in general. Could the equivalent of Starbucks in the motorcycle and automotive world work well. I am personally not aware of no negotiation pricing being successful anywhere. Is anybody aware of someone using that system and it has flourished over the course of time? It would be interesting to know.

    Given the complexities and the skill sets required in the business and the need to understand local markets and the vehicles that might sell well within those markets I am not confident the concept would fly. That could be my own inability to make something of that nature successful and/or my fear of trying the concept out for a couple year period to determine the results. Interesting concept but I have no real confidence of where it would lead.
    F.W. Woolworth
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    Montgomery Ward

    Fixed price retail and distribution thru company-owned stores was the American concept that created mass market retail in the late 1800's
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  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by brprider679 View Post
    The very best place to buy parts altogether is Carolina Euro (www.carolinaeuro.com). They have a parts fiche online that you can actually order from. You don't have to call anybody if you choose not to. However its been my experience that if you call and them and tell them what you need and ask for the best price they will discount it for you. Most dealers can't advertise a discount price without consequences from BMW corp. I've done business with all the major players in the BMW world on bikes and parts but Carolina Euro has always been the best.
    The policy is known as a MAP (Minimum Advertised Price) policy. Has been deemed to be legal.

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    F.W. Woolworth
    J. J. Newberry
    J. C. Penney's
    Sears & Roebuck
    Montgomery Ward

    Fixed price retail and distribution thru company-owned stores was the American concept that created mass market retail in the late 1800's
    Motorcycles are far from mass market in the United States...

    Maybe the point here naming off company's that are either history or on the way out?

  14. #44
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brprider679 View Post
    The very best place to buy parts altogether is Carolina Euro (www.carolinaeuro.com). They have a parts fiche online that you can actually order from. You don't have to call anybody if you choose not to. However its been my experience that if you call and them and tell them what you need and ask for the best price they will discount it for you. Most dealers can't advertise a discount price without consequences from BMW corp. I've done business with all the major players in the BMW world on bikes and parts but Carolina Euro has always been the best.
    Access the microfiche info is great. In the BMW car world, realoem.com provides an invaluable service.
    Cave contents: 99 R11RS, 2013 Toyota Tacoma, 03 Simplicity Legacy, 97 Stihl FS75, Dewalt DW625 & DW744

  15. #45
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by billy walker View Post
    Motorcycles are far from mass market in the United States...

    Maybe the point here naming off company's that are either history or on the way out?
    Each of those corporations have been replaced by others (Kmart...to...Walmart...to.....Amazon) that have managed to reduce distribution and manpower costs while providing the selection desired by the market.

    Relative to motorcycles not being mass marketed...........Many dealerships can move the bulk of their inventory without ever selling to a customer, but by selling to other dealerships. That goes for cars and motorcycles. In addition, MC internet sales, especially of left-over stock, is booming. Ebay has a number of dealerships that will even allow you to do the auction experience.
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