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Thread: 1995 K75 leaking tank.

  1. #1
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    1995 K75 leaking tank.

    I'm thinking of purchasing a 1995 K75 with only 16,000 miles on it. Unfortunately the paint is peeling off underneath where the seem is. This is what the owner is telling me. He say's it's because the ethanol has separated it he gas and the vapors have cause damage. Any opinions on what could be happening and on a bike that has been sitting to long? Thanks. Sincerely Ted....
    Last edited by 143143; 03-28-2013 at 05:56 AM. Reason: wrong number

  2. #2
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    My new-to-me K100 been sitting for more than 10 years as far as I know. It started fine and ran well. The tank is made of aluminum and not steel like Japanese bikes so there is no rust issues. The paint is faded and not in the greatest shape, but my bike is 26 years old.

    As you can see in my other threads, my biggest issue now is leaking seals, can't complain because the bike is so old and rubber parts will age regardless. From my brief period of ownership, the K bike is very well put together and not that hard to take apart. I bought my bike because it started right away, ran well and there were no funny noises. As long as the price is right, you really can'y go wrong.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by cy7878 View Post
    My new-to-me K100 been sitting for more than 10 years as far as I know. It started fine and ran well. The tank is made of aluminum and not steel like Japanese bikes so there is no rust issues. The paint is faded and not in the greatest shape, but my bike is 26 years old.

    As you can see in my other threads, my biggest issue now is leaking seals, can't complain because the bike is so old and rubber parts will age regardless. From my brief period of ownership, the K bike is very well put together and not that hard to take apart. I bought my bike because it started right away, ran well and there were no funny noises. As long as the price is right, you really can'y go wrong.
    Thanks cy7878

  4. #4
    3 Red Bricks
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    The fuel has separated and water has puddled in the low spot (the seam). Aluminum does not rust, it corrodes. The seam has corroded and now there will be pinhole leaks along the seam. If you remove the tank filler cap assembly, you will see the rough dull corrosion along the seam. It should be bright and shiny on a good tank.

    I'm not a big fan of using epoxy "bubblegum" fixes when it comes to fuel leaks right above the hot exhaust. Good used tanks are available but would most likely require paint.



    LONG MAY YOUR BRICK FLY!

    Ride Safe, Ride Far, Ride Often

    Lee Fulton Forum Moderator
    3 Marakesh Red K75Ss
    Mine, Hers, Spare

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by 98lee View Post
    The fuel has separated and water has puddled in the low spot (the seam). Aluminum does not rust, it corrodes. The seam has corroded and now there will be pinhole leaks along the seam. If you remove the tank filler cap assembly, you will see the rough dull corrosion along the seam. It should be bright and shiny on a good tank.

    I'm not a big fan of using epoxy "bubblegum" fixes when it comes to fuel leaks right above the hot exhaust. Good used tanks are available but would most likely require paint.



    can the tank be repaired Flying Brick?

  6. #6
    13278
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    1995 K75 leaking tank

    I had a K75 tank seam leak about 6 to 7 years ago. Not just a pin hole or two, but thin material to boot from corrosion caused by liquid and solids that were definitely not gasoline. I tried the cheapest realistic proper fix first. I removed everything that was removable from the tank after draining (Fuel pump, filter, fuel sending unit w/ float, hoses, etc.). Then after draining the residual fuel and blowing out the vapors, I set the tank in the sun for a few days and made sure, 110% sure, that there were no vapors remaining. I took the tank to the local aluminum "welder" (heli- arc?) and after a sniff test he proceeded to do the best he could. It was not pretty with build up and globs and some burned paint on the face side. After I cleaned the area, I'm sure that I must have used some sort of primer and some paint that came close to the tank color. As I said, that was 6 to 7 years ago and it has been leak free ever since. I had forgotten about the repair until you brought it up.
    We all, me included, should check the low point in the gas tank at least once a year and get rid of all the junk that is not gasoline.
    Charlie
    Last edited by 13278; 04-12-2013 at 12:26 PM.

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