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Thread: Fork oil

  1. #16
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    Your results might vary but years ago I put the Aero Shell in my R80 and my seals leaked shortly after, requiring replacement. Buy some BMW 7.5 from your favorite dealer. It works.

  2. #17
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    On my /7, I hold a socket with a pair of vise grips...this let's me go up the middle of the socket with the allen wrench to hold the damper rod from turning. Loosen the nut and remove it. I then keep the allen wrench in the end of the damper rod and shove it up into the slider...helps if the front end is off the ground. When finished draining, wiggle the allen key to get the damper rod to fall back into the hole. Repeat the process with the socket-vise grips to tighten up. Pretty much all forks are the same up to the late 1980s...Type I forks.
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  3. #18
    Registered User amiles's Avatar
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    If I remember correctly, To drain the /6 forks, don't know about other models;

    first place on center stand front wheel off the ground, full extension of telescopic forks
    Second remove the rubber bottom (dust) caps to expose the 13mm nuts.
    Third using a box wrench (13mm hex) loosen/remove the nut while holding the internal hexagon (4mm key) from moving
    Fourth remove the upper "fill" caps with the pin spanner to vent. Don't remove the receptacles that these thread into (large Hex) as you will release the fork springs. Use care as sometimes the two will be stuck & come out together. The fork springs being released unexpectedly may cause you physical harm if you are in line with the fork tubes.

    At this point I diverge by removing the lower plugs (using the big "dog bone" ring wrench)

    The oil and other contents will drain easily and completely.

    The removal of the large bottom cap allows for more complete drainage including debris in the chamber. The condition of the "bumper" that insets into the large cap may be inspected for deterioration & replaced as needed. As these bumpers disintegrate the loosened "bits" contaminate the fork oil (mine did for sure) and they also fail to perform their "bumper" function . The replacement bumper is of an improved material and was white, the old was black.

    Having the replacement lower big copper washers on hand along with two new bumpers, washers for the top caps the lower "rubber dust caps" and new wave washers for the 13mm nut would be wise.

  4. #19
    #4869 DennisDarrow's Avatar
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    For me, I pretty much follow the routine of Amiles above except:

    Having the bike on the center stand and the nuts removed off of the bottom of the fork, by holding the Allen wrench, and then set the nuts and wavy washers aside. I DO NOT remove the bottom cap assembly with the associated hardware. Instead, as the owners manual advises to do, have a couple of pans ready under the forks to catch the fluid that is now going to FLOW........PULL DOWN on the bottom of the forks. The forks will move perhaps an inch or so in a downward movement and the fluid will gush out into the pan or onto the floor. Let it drain.

    Now, you can push up on the bottom of the forks and seat the threaded rod back through the bottom of the fork or one can just roll it off the center stand and let gravity do the work. Reinstall the wavy washers with the nuts and NO one does not need to super torque those nuts. Put the bike back up on the center stand and refill with the required fluid and amount. God bless......Dennis

  5. #20
    Registered User jad01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 20774 View Post
    On my /7, I hold a socket with a pair of vise grips...this let's me go up the middle of the socket with the allen wrench to hold the damper rod from turning. Loosen the nut and remove it. I then keep the allen wrench in the end of the damper rod and shove it up into the slider...helps if the front end is off the ground. When finished draining, wiggle the allen key to get the damper rod to fall back into the hole. Repeat the process with the socket-vise grips to tighten up. Pretty much all forks are the same up to the late 1980s...Type I forks.
    This is the method I use as well. Works great! It's certainly easy to ID the 13mm socket in my cabinet, what with the plier marks. It seems like I saw a post or article where someone ground two flats on a socket for an open end wrench... can't remember where I saw it though.
    Jim
    '78 R80/7 and '84 R100RS (Blues Brothers), '86 K75C (Icy Hot)
    '90 and '93 Mazda Miatas (Jelly Bean and Red Hot), '02 325ci (Blue Streak)
    '96 Giant Upland (big Kendas & freshly greased bearings!)

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