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Thread: Tire Repair R75/5

  1. #16
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    Back in the old days BMW sold a smallish "toothpaste" tube of tire lube that was easily carryable on a bike. I think you can still see it in the fiche, but it's no longer available.

    Nobody's mentioned this yet, but a small bottle of this stuff might be added to your "kit."
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  2. #17
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    Even websites that offer the Continental RB2 front tire say "tube or tubeless".
    Hmm, that's curious. I was going to throw in that the only tires I ever had any luck with when using the short BMW tool kit irons were the old Continentals RB2/K112 combination and Dunlaps.
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  3. #18
    Registered User dmftoy1's Avatar
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    Tire Repair R75/5

    Agreed - Bridgestone spitfires were a pita to spoon on. Just bought a real life set of Dunlop TT(tube type) tires for my wife's rebel. No clue if they make them in airhead sizes or not?

  4. #19
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    I have Spitfires on my /5. They look a little "thick" but they're nice and sticky, and I like them. But I PAID to have them installed...

    I used to run K87 and K70 (I think) Dunlops. Everything is relative; back then they were better handling than the Continental RB2/K112 combination but due to their pear-shaped cross-section the centers wore quicker than the Continentals. Both Continentals and the Dunlops are still available with "new" materials, but I have no idea about their performance.
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  5. #20
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    Any viewers that have used the "Stubby" tire levers? I'd like to hear more testimonials before I try them. Patching: If you've never patched a tube before-best to read up/watch youtube,etc., but also practice on an old one while at home. Maybe go watch a pro do it.
    "If I had my life to live over, I'd dare to make more mistakes next time...I'd relax,I'd limber up... I would take fewer things seriously...take more chances... take more trips...climb more mountains...swim more rivers...eat more ice cream." Jorge Luis Borges at age 85.

  6. #21
    not lost til out of gas 128521's Avatar
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    morning, just before I get new tires this spring I plan to take an ice pick and make a few holes ( one at a time ) and plug them. ( tubeless tires ) just for fun.
    don't know where I'm going, but I'm making good time. 1990 R 100 GSPD, 2005 R 1200 GS

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
    Any viewers that have used the "Stubby" tire levers? I'd like to hear more testimonials before I try them. Patching: If you've never patched a tube before-best to read up/watch youtube,etc., but also practice on an old one while at home. Maybe go watch a pro do it.
    I've used the Stubby tire levers and they are all I intend to use in the future. My motion pro short levers worked using milk jug rim protectors and I changed my rear tire four times using them, twice after putting the tire on in the wrong direction and twice for pinched tubes. After putting some baby powder on the front tube and using the Stubby levers, the front tire went on the first time without any issues - although a C-clamp helped keep the bead in the rim channel. These were Bridgestone Sptifires tires (110/90-18 rear, 100/90-19 front).

    The ends of the levers have a profile on one side to make getting the bead off the rim easier with another on the other side for putting the tire on the rim to help prevent pinching the tube. Because they are plastic, I expect them to wear out after 20-30 tire changes. My main reason for trying the Stubby's was they require no rim protectors and won't damage the rims. Also, they are designed for spoke wheels using inner tubes and the levers should break before damaging the rim. But, with correct technique that should not happen.
    Last edited by Stan_R80/7; 03-28-2013 at 12:17 AM.
    Stan

    AH# 13238

  8. #23
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    Fortunately, I've never had to use the tire irons and patch kit I always keep in my airhead. I am told that the easiest way to break the bead is to use tire irons and some mounting lube (dish soap and water carried in a small squeeze bottle). Working your way around the tire, use the tire irons to open a gap between the tire and the bead and squirt some lube in. By the time you get around, the lube will enable you to break the bead with the tire irons. I do know this makes breaking the bead on tubeless tires for my other bikes much easier (I mount and balance tires at home).

    That said, I don't ride my airhead that far from home and the patch kit I will probably use if I have to is my cell phone and either a credit card or my wife and my trailer...
    61 Gold Star, 76 R90S, 03 CBR600RR, '13 690 Duke, '14 Street Triple R

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