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Thread: Tire Repair R75/5

  1. #1
    Registered User bluehole's Avatar
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    Tire Repair R75/5

    While checking out tire pump recommendations in another thread it occurred to me I may have trouble repairing a tire. The tires on my Oilhead are tubeless. I can plug the tire, inflate it and make my way home or to a shop. But I do not think that is possible to plug tubed tires. Wouldn't I have to replace the tube or am I wrong about this? If I have to replace the tube I think a call to roadside assistance is in order.
    2000 R1100RS
    1972 R75/5

  2. #2
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    You are correct about not being able to plug a tube. In order to fix it on the road, you have to carry a bead breaker, tire irons and a tube with you.
    Ron

    91 K75RT ABS

  3. #3
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    Or carry one of the many "squirt and run" goopy emergency repair products. But I'd be replacing that tube as soon as I could.

    So.... which tube to carry? Both.
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  4. #4
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lmo1131 View Post
    So.... which tube to carry? Both.
    I'd heard if you want or can only carry one, carry the 18"...it will stetch to fit the front wheel. The other way around might be a problem.
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  5. #5
    Registered User bluehole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 20774 View Post
    I'd heard if you want or can only carry one, carry the 18"...it will stetch to fit the front wheel. The other way around might be a problem.

    I have heard that too. Hope it is true. Hopefully, I will not be in a position to confirm.
    2000 R1100RS
    1972 R75/5

  6. #6
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    Hope it is true. Hopefully, I will not be in a position to confirm.
    Actually, we hope that you will never be in a position to deny that it works ...
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  7. #7
    Registered User bluehole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lmo1131 View Post
    Actually, we hope that you will never be in a position to deny that it works ...
    Actually, yes, you are right. Should have thought about that more carefully.
    2000 R1100RS
    1972 R75/5

  8. #8
    Registered User ebeeby's Avatar
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    All you need are irons (in the tool kit) and a patch kit with valve stem tool. Some valve caps double as a valve stem tool. You can break the bead with the center stand if need be..

  9. #9
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EBEEBY View Post
    All you need are irons (in the tool kit) and a patch kit with valve stem tool. Some valve caps double as a valve stem tool. You can break the bead with the center stand if need be..
    Oh, if it were so easy!!

    I dread having to try and patch a tire on the side of the road. I did it at home many years ago, but that was with tube-type rubber. Today, with the tubeless rubber, the beads are very stiff and tight. It is quite a strain to get the bead over the rim. At least for me...
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  10. #10
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Buy your tires. Change your own at home. Even if you save only a little money doing that, when you need to beside the road, in a parking lot, or at a motel at least you have some experience and confidence.

    Find a tech day where folks are doing tires the old fashioned way. Practice!

    To repair a tube you need to break the bead on one side (big C clamp) lever that side of the tire off the rim, and pull out the tube. Then you need to install a spare tube you have with you, or use a patch on the tube you just took out. Then put it back together and air it up.

    Something/somehow to break the bead.
    Tire Irons
    Patch Kit or Spare Tube
    Pump or cartridge kit to refill the tire

    p.s. You also need to know how to remove and install the wheels.

    Most people who have jobs/work/etc do a fair bit of their riding on weekends. A flat tire on late Saturday afternoon could get you towed to a shop that will open bright and early Tuesday morning. The last inner tube repair I did on the road was about half way between Tok and Chicken, Alaska.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

  11. #11
    Registered User dmftoy1's Avatar
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    Tire Repair R75/5

    Watch some YouTube videos if you've never done it before. Some of the tips are worth their weight in gold.

  12. #12
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    A patched tube will last the life of the tire. I have some stubby tire irons, a bead buddy II, an airman tour pump, and a patch kit. However, I can see using a can of Threebond seal-n-air to get home when the distance is less than 100 miles:http://www.aerostich.com/threebond-seal-n-air.html

    I expect the tube will have to be replaced and the tire may still leak slowly. But, for a weekend rider seal-n-air may get you home.
    Stan

    AH# 13238

  13. #13
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    "ll you need are irons (in the tool kit) and a patch kit with valve stem tool. Some valve caps double as a valve stem tool. You can break the bead with the center stand if need be.."

    I agree with the above previous post - remember this is an R75/5 and there should be no mention or use of "Tubeless" when talking about the tires to be used on this "tube type" rim - the use of tubless tires or old tubless on tube application will ensure an absolute nightmare on the roadside sometime.

    If you fit the right tires for the bike such as but not limited to Dunlop K70 they will fit properly, install easily, and repair easily.

    Some things to consider:

    1) you probably only need some quality (not bicycle skins) tire patches and the glue that goes with them - it is possible but unlikely that you will cut a large hole unless you spear an imbeded sharp rock in an offroad situation - in a pinch just to get home or to civilization at sane reduced speed you can get by with a slab of "Gorilla Tape" for a tire patch of an ordinary nail hole

    2) if you carry a tube use the one for 350X18 tire with the 350 being the largest number on the tube spec - the 400X18 or 350-450 is hard to get all folded into the narrow 325X19 front tire without pinching or getting under the bead - you can if no other choice put the 325X19 tube into the rear 400X18 - not too cool and god knows what folds you cannot see but better than a rented truck or paid haul - have done that once when I had two tubes on a tour and the rear spare I was carrying unfolded in pieces totally rotten - keep track of how long your spares have been exposed to air - the nice compact folding cheap thin syn rubber tubes don't have a long carry life in dirty toolbox

    3) if you puncture a tire on the road get to it as fast as you can - getting the tire off is much easier when the tire is hot - otherwise try to find some way to warm the tire/wheel in sun or exhaust before you lever on or off

    **** again I stress the size issue - if you are one of those who cannot resist the temptation to use a wider than 400 rear tire you will find that when you remove the wheel, fix the tire and blow it back up (easier to do when off bike if using a stroke type pump) you will find that you cannot force the wide tire back through the space between the swingarm and brake shoes and will have to then let out most of the air again.

    LAST AND ALSO FIRST AND MOST IMPORTANT tie up the centerstand somehow so you cannot push the bike off stand while working with wheel removal/reinstall

    As someone above mentioned - practice at home so you know the drill and know you have all tools necessary

    If your tire has not been on the rim forever you can usually heel stomp it off the bead but be very careful how you do this if you have a disk brake (no problem for this R75/5)

    In general it is just a big heavy bicycle - same drill except you cannot turn it over on the handlebars and seat

  14. #14
    Monza Blue 1974 R90/6
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    I agree with Paul's recommendation about changing your own tires as prep in the event you need to do it on the road. It does get easier with practice and there is a nice sense of accomplishment.

    I also agree that it is just a big heavy bicycle - sort of.

    I would add to the above list of tank bag items:

    - a third tire iron, about four inches or so longer than the two that come in the BMW tool kit. Nice to have a bit more leverage for that first bite.

    - three plastic rim protectors

    - a snake that screws into the valve stem and makes it super easy to get the stem back out of the rim after the new or repaired tube is back in the tire. Aerostich sells one for $24 which seems like too much money. But, I find the valve stem is the hardest part of the job. There is hardly any room to get your fingers between the stiff bead and the rim. After you use the snake, you'll agree that it is money well spent.

    - a small bottle (I use one of those airplane serving size vodka bottles) of tire lube and a small foam paint brush.


    Barron

  15. #15
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 44006 View Post
    remember this is an R75/5 and there should be no mention or use of "Tubeless" when talking about the tires to be used on this "tube type" rim - the use of tubless tires or old tubless on tube application will ensure an absolute nightmare on the roadside sometime.
    It my understanding that tube-type tires are very rare these days. Inch-size tires are somewhat rare but they can be found. But IMO you will typically have to use a tubless tire on the tube-type rim. Not really an issue with fitment as the tube is really holding the air in. But working with the stiff bead of a tubeless tire is a mofo'. I have only the stock tool kit irons and usually wedge some old pieces of inner tube between the rim and iron. The smaller irons really don't have the leverage. And plastic rim protectors (even bits of milk cartons) would work better than the rubber.

    Not trying to make a tire thread on this, but I haven't seen a reputable tube-type tire in a very long time. Even websites that offer the Continental RB2 front tire say "tube or tubeless".
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

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