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Thread: Tie Down Straps

  1. #1
    hoss
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    Tie Down Straps

    Fellow Bikers.....

    Please advise as to a set of safe, easy to use motorcycle ratchet, tie down straps.
    I will be tailoring a f650 GS and a Triumph Tiger.
    Would appreciate your input.
    Than you.

    Hoss

  2. #2
    Registered User
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    Tire Fix

    I just picked up two of these (two bikes to trailer). I knew as soon as I read about them that they would work better than any conventional tie-downs. Pricey but I figure that it's worth the peace of mind.
    http://www.webbikeworld.com/r4/acebikes-tyre-fix/
    mike

  3. #3
    Polarbear Polarbear's Avatar
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    Soft ties:)

    Pick up some soft ties at any dirt bike shop or Cycle Gear! These make really nice links to your hooks on the straps you suggest. We all use the straps with hooks, which are rubber coated, but the soft straps add a level of ease in and around the handlebars and so on. They are about a foot or so long and make the job easier and safer to the bike from scratches. Use'em anywhere the need arises, around the frame, handlebars.etc...They also make for really nice bungie connects for packing the bike for touring, making just about any frame or the like, a neat option to connect a bungie. Very useful. Randy

  4. #4
    http://www.rd400racer.com rd400racer's Avatar
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    I've used the plain old pull type straps for over 30 years and have never had a problem. I just get a small loop type strap to go around the triple and pull them tight. I found that they don't even have to be pulled all that tight, just enough to snug them down.

    My coup de gras was fitting 3 race bikes in the back of my truck. By the time I got them situated I hardly needed any straps!


    http://www.rd400racer.com/

    2001 Ducati Monster; 1996 R1100GS; 1985 RZ350; 1977 RD400

  5. #5
    Out There Somewhere bmwrider88's Avatar
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    I advise actual ratcheting straps over any other variety. Go to a good local motorcycle shop to see what they have. I've used many kinds of straps before, but have found nothing that gives as good a result as a strong ratchet strap. Never had a ratchet strap slip or let go. I HAVE had other types of strap slip and go slack tho.

    If you've never done this before, there's more than one single theory and method of tying down a bike. I'd always strapped to the handle bars, employing the front suspension as one aspect of the tie down "system"- but this presents two potential problems: blowing out the front fork seals, or also perhaps damaging any fairing or body work.

    As to NOT damaging any bodywork, there are at least two ways to avoid this. One is a Canyon Dancer,
    http://www.canyondancer.com/
    which puts the tie-downs outside any fairing, etc., but still employs the handlebars as the tie down point. You can also choke so called soft ties around the handle bars and hook your tie down straps to them.

    The other way to avoid BOTH potential problems is to get a pair of soft ties, and choke them around the fork tubes below the triple tree, stanchion, or fairing. This eliminates the chance of blowing fork seals by removing the front suspension from the equation, simultaneously insuring no damage to any bodywork. You may need a shorter ratchet strap tho, as the tie down point is going to be far lower, thus closer to the trailer attachment. I know dirt bike riders who use this method, and have heard sport bike riders talk about doing this. I've done this myself to trailer my R100RS a few times. I also have a Canyon Dancer. Basically, I've done it all.

    A properly tied down bike requires only straps to hold it in place- no side stand needed- in fact, a side stand only provides an unwanted pivot point. I use four straps (front & rear) for distance trailering, but only two for shorty runs. If you haven't done much trailering, ask the guys at your local shop about properly tying down your bikes. You'll probably get some good advice from them.

    Cheers, & good luck.
    Be The Change You Want To See In The World

  6. #6
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    Here's what they mean by "soft ties"

    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  7. #7
    Registered User Woodbutcher's Avatar
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    I've found that the ratchet type straps aren't needed and are actually a pain to undo. This is what I use: http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com...-Tiedowns.aspx

    They have a caribeener type hook so they don't unhook and it swivels also. Soft tie built in on the bike end and a velco strap to wrap up the excess strap. I just use these on the front and some cheaper soft tie Ancra brand on the rear. I tie my GSA down on the front forks as described in this document: http://www.grassrootsbmw.com/uploads/Tiedown2.pdf

    Works great. The bike is rock solid.

    Oh, I should add that I do one overhand knot with the strap right at the buckle. This kind of locks the strap in under the buckle. Wish I had a picture. Anyway, that is to prevent slippage.
    Rusty
    Austin, TX
    Two Wheeled Texans
    2009 R1200GSA

  8. #8
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    Probably the simplest way to secure a load, with nothing more than a piece of rope, is to just throw a Trucker's Hitch into the line and cinch it down.

    Of course, you have to remember how to tie a Trucker's Hitch when you need one. .. . which is why I have to carry a little card in my wallet.

    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  9. #9
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    I use camlock straps and don't use ratcheting straps. I have never had a problem but use good heavy duty straps with a keeper on the hooks.

    If your straps have open hooks a wrap of duct tape on the hook makes them always stay in place.

    Whenever possible I strap at the front fork bridge, allowing the bike to float on its own suspension. At the back I strap the rear tire/wheel down and also let the bike float on the rear suspension.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

  10. #10
    Caribbean Druid
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    Go get yourself some PitBull trailer restraints. They are AWESOME. Pic below shows the PitBulls installed up front in our track trailer, when we were first outfitting it. You don't even need front tie-downs once the rear restraints are attached. Easier to put on and take off than tie-downs, and more secure as well. Also, this pic was taken before I put the 3rd one in for the Monster as well.

    DSC02599a.jpg

  11. #11
    Macrunch MCrenshaw's Avatar
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    Whether you use the pull down type or the ratchet straps, suggest you not use the hooks as they can easily come loose if you hit a bump. Instead buy a set of good quality caribeeners. Put them through the hook eye and then loop around through the strap loop. They won't come loose accidentally.

  12. #12
    jeepinbanditrider
    Guest
    You are overthinking it. Go down to Wal Mart and pick up the 300 or 400 lb straps and use 4 to 8 of them in a configuration of your choice. Used those cheapo straps forever and they work just fine.

    Infact I just got done hauling both of my bike 1400 miles in the back of a Penske truck with a bunch of other stuff using nothing but wal mart straps.

  13. #13
    Registered User
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    I use HF ratchets with tape 7 soft loops and a HF front wheel holder. As for over thinking, I do in fact put an "extra insurance strap" at each end of the bike. Soft loop & a strap to front & doubles on rear wheel on top of the rest of them. Thank you Chinese strap makers.

    P.S., if you want evidence of not over thinking tiedowns on other stuff just drive down the hwy & look at all the sofa cushions, plastic chairs 7 other pieces of furniture lying about.
    "If I had my life to live over, I'd dare to make more mistakes next time...I'd relax,I'd limber up... I would take fewer things seriously...take more chances... take more trips...climb more mountains...swim more rivers...eat more ice cream." Jorge Luis Borges at age 85.

  14. #14
    jeepinbanditrider
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    I was speaking to over thinking about the type/brand of tiedown/ratchet strap. The cheap wally world/Chinese ratchet straps work just fine for our applications.

  15. #15
    Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Downs View Post
    I was speaking to over thinking about the type/brand of tiedown/ratchet strap. The cheap wally world/Chinese ratchet straps work just fine for our applications.
    And I understood,thus the weakness of web conversations.
    My point was that when trailering anything expensive like a MC that going the extra step, which I called a type of overthinking, is a good step to take-tape,extra straps,etc..
    "If I had my life to live over, I'd dare to make more mistakes next time...I'd relax,I'd limber up... I would take fewer things seriously...take more chances... take more trips...climb more mountains...swim more rivers...eat more ice cream." Jorge Luis Borges at age 85.

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