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Thread: Camping Gota Have Gota Leave

  1. #16
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    I always carry 4 or 5 small highway road flares. Good for what they are intended, but also great for starting fires.
    Military type heat tabs for cooking. Don't need a stove with them, just open the foil pack, touch with a match and boil away!
    Shorts, t-shirt and comfortable shoes.
    Have a safe trip.

  2. #17
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisSkor View Post
    I'm also packing a small heating pad for those cold nights.
    What's a heating pad?
    Lee 2011 K1300S
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  3. #18
    Registered User wvpc's Avatar
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    Don't forget the H2O

    Don't forget to hydrate! Carry 2-3 litres of water and drink it every day. More if going thru the deserts.
    12 R1200 RT
    83 R100 RT

  4. #19
    Registered User tuckerman's Avatar
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    Kermit chair along with all the above.
    J.R., 2012 RT
    MOA #186976
    IBA #42334

  5. #20
    Registered User stanley83's Avatar
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    I second the shake-down trip

    Quote Originally Posted by AKThumper View Post
    I might practice setting up the tent once or twice prior to the rally trip....
    Do this well before the start of your big trip. It will give you a much better idea of how to pack your stuff on your bike, how well or badly the stuff you've got works, what's missing, what's extraneous and how long it will take you to make and break camp.

    An LED headlamp is almost essential.

    Note that there is no standard between companies for sleeping bag ratings. Ratings assume that you are within a tent or other shelter and are on top of a sleeping pad. Many people are "cold" or "warm" sleepers, meaning they need more or less insulation than the average person. Knowing which you are will help in the choice of a bag. Down is lighter, packs smaller and will last longer than synthetic for a given rating. It will also cost you more.
    Justin in Somerville, MA
    _________________________
    76 R75/6, 78 P200E, 63 VBB
    Lots of bicycles

  6. #21
    jdubeemer jdubick's Avatar
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    KOA directory, A cabin is better if it is raining.
    Jim Dubick
    Boaz, Alabama
    R1200RT,R100/7,KLX250
    BMW MOA, BMW MOAL, AMA, CMA

  7. #22
    MearthA rdalland's Avatar
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    Unscented disposable/baby wipes.
    ride what you've got; enjoy the road you're on!

    Reid - Stone Ridge, NY - MOA #69187 - Turbo Fluffy Motoclub - IBA #50182

  8. #23
    R100GS, '89 Guenther's Avatar
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    Pee bottle...

    /Guenther

  9. #24
    look out!!! Visian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elgin Mary View Post
    I bought a Jet Boil to make instant coffee ...
    Quote Originally Posted by AKThumper View Post
    Jet boil is a great addition, with instant coffee....
    Uh... There is a great French Press accessory for the Jetboil... life is too short to drink instant coffee!

    Two essential bits of gear for me are a Rollaroaster and SPAM

  10. #25
    OldBMWMaster JDOCKERY132445's Avatar
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    This

    Monkey Butt powder. Trust me, you will need it.

    A source of drinking water on your bike.

    It sounds as if you want to hit the road shortly after waking. Buy a light weight tarp to cover your tent; otherwise you will be standing around waiting for the sun to remove the dew from your tent before packing.
    Jerry Dockery
    309 N. 3rd. Ave.
    Kure Beach, NC 28449
    1996 R1100RT main bike & 1985 K100RS...too fast to believe.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patch View Post
    Already mentioned .. but a "comfortable" sleeping bag, not just an OK one. The best tech spec bag on the market may or may not be comfortable for you so get in some before buying. A slight difference in girth makes a HUGE difference when you're zipped up.

    My addition - a good pillow. Make the room for it. Neck fatigue and stiff muscles will not be your friend on an extended trip. I prefer the "Fillo" by Nemo in size medium. This blows up and has a memory-type foam covering that is comfy. Like an airhawk pad... less air is best but you can adjust to your hearts content. Packs small - like 1/2 the size of a nalgene bottle. Worth every ounce and inch of space.
    Yes & yes to the get a good bag. Making certain it has enough wiggle room matters for many-I for one, dislike the small foot area that many cold weather rated bags provide. Also, I find that "how much is enough pad" increases with my age.

    OP: Heating pad??????????????????????????????????????????????? ?????? Did you say heating pad????????????????????????????
    "If I had my life to live over, I'd dare to make more mistakes next time...I'd relax,I'd limber up... I would take fewer things seriously...take more chances... take more trips...climb more mountains...swim more rivers...eat more ice cream." Jorge Luis Borges at age 85.

  12. #27
    One big Oaff brewmeister's Avatar
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    Also I carrie a grundig pocket am/fm/sw/weather band radio the size of a pack of smokes,find out weather/keep you company at camp. 30.00 $ at radio shak.
    81 R100RT

  13. #28
    jdubeemer jdubick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Visian View Post
    Uh... There is a great French Press accessory for the Jetboil... life is too short to drink instant coffee!

    Two essential bits of gear for me are a Rollaroaster and SPAM
    Ian, you need to lay off on the SPAM!
    Jim Dubick
    Boaz, Alabama
    R1200RT,R100/7,KLX250
    BMW MOA, BMW MOAL, AMA, CMA

  14. #29
    Registered User lkraus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
    OP: Heating pad??????????????????????????????????????????????? ?????? Did you say heating pad????????????????????????????

    I guess you need to carry an extension cord so you can plug into the Winnebago next door?
    Larry
    2006 R1200RT

  15. #30
    Registered User argent brick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stanley83 View Post
    Note that there is no standard between companies for sleeping bag ratings. Ratings assume that you are within a tent or other shelter and are on top of a sleeping pad. Many people are "cold" or "warm" sleepers, meaning they need more or less insulation than the average person. Knowing which you are will help in the choice of a bag. Down is lighter, packs smaller and will last longer than synthetic for a given rating. It will also cost you more.

    Let's take this a step farther. We will use a +40 degree rated sleeping bag as an example. Normally, a bag rated at plus forty degrees will allow you to survive in a forty degree environment, but you will not be happy or comfortable. Most experienced adventurers will carry a bag that is rated colder than their conditions call for. For example, I try to get in a little snow camping every year with a good friend of mine. I like to be warm so my bag is rated at +5 degrees. My camping buddy uses a 20 degree bag(He's nuts), with a 40 degree bag for the summer months. If I had to use one bag year-round, it would be rated at +20. FWIW, lots of my friends use 20 degree bags year round and are very happy with them.

    Sleeping bag construction can also make a big difference in your comfort level. A little time and research into the different fabrics, fillers, and design features can pay off big, giving you a lighter, smaller, and warmer bag by a simple change in design or assembly techniques. REI is a good place to start looking for sleeping bags. Ask questions. They have great employees that know their stuff. REI will also rent bags for a small fee.

    Stanley is 100% correct about down sleeping bags. They normally are lighter and pack smaller than synthetics, but, unlike some synthetics, they are not worth a cr*p if they get wet.

    Just my 2 cents.
    Lynn
    MOA #57883
    Current Ride: 1995 K75 Standard
    Past: 1978 Yamaha XS 750, 1976 BMW R60/6

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