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Thread: DIY vs Warranty

  1. #61
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scalese01@verizon.net View Post
    What do I need to do to prove all the scheduled work is done properly?
    Perform all work as per the maintenance schedule.

    Keep a very detailed log of the work performed along with the date and mileage.

    Keep all receipts for parts purchased from a BMW dealer as well as lubes purchased.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by ponch1 View Post
    .................. There are honest and good shops, but they are in the minority, IMO.
    I have no clue how to respond to this. Your feelings are your feelings. Hopefully they are wrong.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by ponch1 View Post
    There are honest and good shops, but they are in the minority, IMO.
    I'd have to agree. Not based on personal experience, but based on the experience of co-workers, friends and neighbors, having listened to their rants and actually verified some of the work done.

    I'm lucky to be able to work on everything from chainsaws to piston aircraft. Besides, I'm far too picky to let anyone work on any of the motorcycles and cars that I own.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider View Post
    I'd have to agree. Not based on personal experience, but based on the experience of co-workers, friends and neighbors, having listened to their rants and actually verified some of the work done.

    I'm lucky to be able to work on everything from chainsaws to piston aircraft. Besides, I'm far too picky to let anyone work on any of the motorcycles and cars that I own.
    I'm curious. All the people outside of the industry that are apparently quite skilled on their own motorcycles why didn't you enter the industry? Those that achieved those skills obviously expended some effort and a willingness to learn. And presumably enjoy the work. It sounds like we could use those types of folks working at dealerships and independents. Good people are hard to find and those that are good will immediately move forward within the industry. How do those of us in the industry make it attractive to those outside the industry who possess the required skills?

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by billy walker View Post
    I'm curious. All the people outside of the industry that are apparently quite skilled on their own motorcycles why didn't you enter the industry?
    Because I leaned my lesson; never turn your hobby (if it is a real passion) into your work. I used to fly five days a week. The last thing I wanted to see on my day off is another airplane.

    Furthermore, you couldn't afford me. Removing a valve cover isn't as simple as just removing a bunch of fasteners and pulling it off. The whole area gets cleaned to the nth degree before it gets removed. Do you think a shop does that...yeah right. I see very little point to using quality oils and filters if I am letting dirt into an engine.

    Some of us do not have use for the trades...I already had to fix two plumbing eff ups (yep, licenced trades) in the first year in a new home. I also fixed the Honeywell ignitor unit in my gas furnace (two $2.50 relays). You don't want to know what they wanted to charge for that job.

    The trick is to be self sufficient.

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider View Post
    Because I leaned my lesson; never turn your hobby (if it is a real passion) into your work. I used to fly five days a week. The last thing I wanted to see on my day off is another airplane.
    True with many folks if not most. I did turn my hobby into work and I have loved it for most of my adult career.

    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider View Post
    Furthermore, you couldn't afford me. Removing a valve cover isn't as simple as just removing a bunch of fasteners and pulling it off. The whole area gets cleaned to the nth degree before it gets removed. Do you think a shop does that...yeah right. I see very little point to using quality oils and filters if I am letting dirt into an engine.
    Actually some techs do work like that. Of course most don't. That is why the industry could use people of your nature. As to whether the store can afford you I assume that implies customers couldn't afford you. Are customer's willing to pay someone like yourself for work done "right"? The forum contains many riders... are folks willing to pay for someone of this nature?

    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider View Post
    Some of us do not have use for the trades...I already had to fix two plumbing eff ups (yep, licenced trades) in the first year in a new home. I also fixed the Honeywell ignitor unit in my gas furnace (two $2.50 relays). You don't want to know what they wanted to charge for that job.

    The trick is to be self sufficient.
    Doesn't leave much hope for customers in general. Hopefully things are not that bad at most dealerships and/or independents. If they are that's all the more reason we need folks like your self. For folks that care about what get's produced it is a worthwhile goal.

  7. #67
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    We're really not getting many opinions here. I do have a question: Do most folks on the forum believe that no tech cares about the quality of work performed on a customers motorcycle? The same question for dealer principals: Do most folks think the dealer principle doesn't care either? Honest well thought out responses would be sincerely appreciated.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by billy walker View Post
    That is why the industry could use people of your nature.
    If I did work for the trade, I'd start my own business instead of letting someone else getting rich off me. Then I'd have full control over the quality of work and who I hire.


    Quote Originally Posted by billy walker View Post
    As to whether the store can afford you I assume that implies customers couldn't afford you. Are customer's willing to pay someone like yourself for work done "right"? The forum contains many riders... are folks willing to pay for someone of this nature?
    Yes to your first question, and I doubt it, to your last question.

    I wanted to replace the ignition wires on my car. The choice was either a factory set at almost $500 or replacement aftermarket ignition wires made and sold by a private individual directly or through a popular parts vendor. Its a good thing I didn't trust the quality of his cables. I have heard of some of his crimped terminals coming off and it wasn't till now when I repaired the ignition wire of a local owner that I saw how poorly made they were. No quality control, period! I invested in the very expensive Beru crimping tool, made my own set and recouped my money slowly by selling Beru replacement ignition wire sets.

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider View Post
    ....................

    Yes to your first question, and I doubt it, to your last question.........................
    Are you of the opinion that most folks want excellent work but are not willing to pay the price to get it?

  10. #70
    Registered User donbmw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by billy walker View Post
    Are you of the opinion that most folks want excellent work but are not willing to pay the price to get it?
    I have been in the Aviation industriy for over 25 year and was the service manange for and Honda dealer for 5 years. And i have seen that over 50% of the customers what the work they need as cut rate as possible. In the Aviation side it is even worse.
    1975 R90/6, 1980 and 1982 R65, !959 TR3A Triumph Car

  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by donbmw View Post
    I have been in the Aviation industriy for over 25 year and was the service manange for and Honda dealer for 5 years. And i have seen that over 50% of the customers what the work they need as cut rate as possible. In the Aviation side it is even worse.
    Cut rate for motorcycle work never seems to work well for a variety of reasons. Good people just aren't willing to work for such a low rate as discussed previously on an earlier post. Given the level of training required and the added complexity of today's motorcycle's you need to compensate well and expect quality in return. If a good tech in today's world cannot afford a home in whatever part of the country he/she may live in you're wasting everybody's time. The required skill sets deserve good to excellent compensation. It's up to management to make sure the store is run in such a manner that you can attract quality people, provide the opportunity for a reasonable middle class life style, and for reinvestment in the store for things such as all of the on-going training requirements that are necessary in today's environment. If you can't pull that off you turn out crap to put it bluntly.

    The business is no where near as profitable as many think. You need to take in 12 months of revenue in an approximate 8 month period for most of the United States. If you can't do that you go thru the cycle of lay-offs which benefits no one especially the customer. Most service departments actually lose money on a 12-month basis as hard as that may be to believe. It's an extremely tough business to remain profitable year after year. Proof in the pudding is how many have gone out of business over the last 4 to 5 years. Many due to their own stupidity and many just not comprehending the cost of doing business.

    It just like home owners who get themselves in debt they cannot handle. Business owners go through the same thing. Most folks will seriously underestimate the cost of their life style as well as the cost of running a business. People that want to get rich don't open motorcycle dealerships, they go into another field.

  12. #72
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by billy walker View Post
    Are you of the opinion that most folks want excellent work but are not willing to pay the price to get it?
    Opinion: yes. Many, perhaps the majority, want excellence at cut rate prices. Thus common terms like "stealership". They think the hourly rates are outrageous -- apparently things like rent, taxes, insurance, utilities, employee benefits, etc., are not something they should pay for. Of course where they work it's the other way around... the company is cheap because it won't pay them what they are worth nor provide desired benefits.

    I do the work that I am capable of doing because I have the time. I mostly enjoy it. It's not so much about saving money. It's about doing things in addition to the minimal required; things I don't mind doing myself but may mind paying someone else to do. Example: my bike is cleanest after a service because I use a general rule of cleaning things that I removed before re-installing. I also clean the parts of the bike that would be hidden by the removed item. I wouldn't expect any dealer or independent tech to do the same (although some might surprise me).

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