Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 16 to 27 of 27

Thread: Help with planning Canada Ride

  1. #16
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    1,751
    If Kelowna and highway 33 is important, then I'd just do the section from Kamloops to Merritt, then across 97C to Kelowna. That is the nicest part of the 5A. If you have the time, then you could go down to Princeton and back up.
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2009 F800GS
    I can't wait to retire and have a fixed income. The one I have now is always broke.

  2. #17
    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    749
    Quote Originally Posted by DickNCa View Post
    Thanks again for all your suggestions. Planning is half the fun of the ride. My riding buddy is anxious to book rooms for each night of our ride, so we have selected destinations for each of 4 nights in Canada. We have decided to slow down a bit so we can enjoy more of the sights and scenery on our first ride to Canada for all of us.

    Day one Coeur d'Alene to Nakusp. http://goo.gl/maps/2HQ80

    Day two Nakusp to Golden http://goo.gl/maps/rbuuR

    Day three Golden to Jasper http://goo.gl/maps/AgX4F

    Day four Jasper to Kamloops http://goo.gl/maps/olUu0

    Day five Kamloops to U.S. http://goo.gl/maps/sghaq

    We have tried to include as many of the roads you guys have suggested as possible. Have I missed any must-see roads? All of you have commented on TCH Hwy 1. Day two of the route planned looks like it inlcudes a couple hundred km of this road.

    Rinty says



    On day two we were thinking about lingering in Kootenay area and arriving in Golden later rather than earlier. That day I think is about 302 miles (486 km). I don't think we have much choice about running Rogers Pass early in the day. TCH seems to be the only option?

    Dick
    Hi,

    I live in Armstrong (it is on your maps) and have ridden these roads. Day 1 should be fun. Day 2 I believe you should rethink. Consider riding to New Dever, Kaslo (great road,) Kootenai Bay ferry, south then north to Cranbrook (great roads but in summer may have some traffic,) then north to Golden. These are all very scenic roads and the traffic will be less than on your proposed route after you get to Vernon. Day 3 is fine. Day 4 to Kamloops is the TCH, which I suggested you avoid on day two. No fun, with wall-to-wall traffic the last time I rode it in the summer there were idiots passing to gain only seconds on the rare passing lanes. Use your skills to find a safe place in the line, and then safeguard it - no tailgater or big truck behind you. This will not be fun. Be patient. Day 5 - as mentioned, 5A is a great road to Penticton; much more fun and probably as fast as the freeway. I would not take the connector to just south of Kelowna because you are again on a major highway - hwy 97.

    Hope we have been helpful and you have a great trip. (Oh yeah, bring passports and leave your guns at home.)
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

  3. #18
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    1,751
    Quote Originally Posted by BCKRIDER View Post
    Hi,

    I live in Armstrong (it is on your maps) and have ridden these roads. Day 1 should be fun. Day 2 I believe you should rethink. Consider riding to New Dever, Kaslo (great road,) Kootenai Bay ferry, south then north to Cranbrook (great roads but in summer may have some traffic,) then north to Golden. These are all very scenic roads and the traffic will be less than on your proposed route after you get to Vernon. Day 3 is fine. Day 4 to Kamloops is the TCH, which I suggested you avoid on day two. No fun, with wall-to-wall traffic the last time I rode it in the summer there were idiots passing to gain only seconds on the rare passing lanes. Use your skills to find a safe place in the line, and then safeguard it - no tailgater or big truck behind you. This will not be fun. Be patient. Day 5 - as mentioned, 5A is a great road to Penticton; much more fun and probably as fast as the freeway. I would not take the connector to just south of Kelowna because you are again on a major highway - hwy 97.

    Hope we have been helpful and you have a great trip. (Oh yeah, bring passports and leave your guns at home.)
    As he all ready will have covered the New Denver and Kaslo route on day 1, I suspect that is why he's chosen the route he has for day two, Yes it includes a lot of the Trans Canada hwy, but the trip over the Monashees on Hwy 6 is worth the pain. My advice for the #1 is to just relax and go with the flow. Getting stessed out and trying to pass lines of traffic just adds frustration and onlyu gets you to the back of the next line. It does have some nice scenery to enjoy if you don't let the traffic get to you.

    It's going to be near impossible to take in every great road and avoid every crappy or busy one on a limited time frame. You just have to take the good with the bad and enjoy the fact that you're out riding. Hope it's a great trip. You can always catch the missed routes on the next trip (there will always be a next trip).
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2009 F800GS
    I can't wait to retire and have a fixed income. The one I have now is always broke.

  4. #19
    Registered User RINTY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Posts
    4,285
    The Trans Canada Highway section from Revelstoke to Golden is 92 miles. Going the south route, you've got 195 miles of ho hum riding from Creston through Cranbrook to Golden.

    As for the passing lanes on the TCH, I'm probably in the minority , but I kind of enjoy running with the passing traffic. Going up the high passes, with the engine under load, you get a nice snarl from the Remus.
    Last edited by rinty; 03-22-2013 at 02:01 PM.
    Rinty

    "When you don't know where you're going, any road will get you there."

  5. #20
    Registered User DickNCA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    San Francisco East Bay
    Posts
    34
    Quote Originally Posted by MCMXCIVRS View Post
    It's going to be near impossible to take in every great road and avoid every crappy or busy one on a limited time frame. You just have to take the good with the bad and enjoy the fact that you're out riding. Hope it's a great trip. You can always catch the missed routes on the next trip (there will always be a next trip).
    I know we will have a great trip. You guys have been a tremendous help. And Ed your right....there will always be the next trip.

    Dick

  6. #21
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    1,751
    Quote Originally Posted by rinty View Post
    As for the passing lanes on the TCH, I'm probably in the minority , but I kind of enjoy running with the passing traffic. Going up the high passes, with the engine under load, you get a nice snarl from the Remus.
    I was thinking more of the non passing lane sections where its a struggle to work up through the line and get past the lead blocker. Passing lanes in BC seem to be an all out race to the finish with the blocker racing as well to prevent anyone from getting past. It always baffle me how they can only mange 60 Kmh all the way then suddenly and instantaneouly accelerate to 120 Kmh when the passing lane begins
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2009 F800GS
    I can't wait to retire and have a fixed income. The one I have now is always broke.

  7. #22
    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    749
    Quote Originally Posted by MCMXCIVRS View Post
    I was thinking more of the non passing lane sections where its a struggle to work up through the line and get past the lead blocker. Passing lanes in BC seem to be an all out race to the finish with the blocker racing as well to prevent anyone from getting past. It always baffle me how they can only mange 60 Kmh all the way then suddenly and instantaneouly accelerate to 120 Kmh when the passing lane begins
    Sorry to say, I don't understand either the quote or quotation that it was a reply to. I've ridden this road in both spring and fall and used the passing lanes to get by slow vehicles then ridden at slightly above the posted limit (some areas are patrolled) with no traffic and lots of time to take in the scenery. In the summer, when you get the rare vista of the highway below you and it is solid vehicles - well, my take is to pass until you have a car that doesn't tailgate behind you and a car (not a large vehicle) in front of you and then protect that position when the passing lanes appear. You are not holding up "faster traffic" more than a minute or two from their destination. You just drift back so you are 3 seconds behind the car ahead, relax, and take in the scenery. Until the next passing lane, where you try to keep your chosen follower behind you and, yes, block traffic.

    I do my best to NEVER impede faster drivers/riders when their speed can actually save them time. Only when nobody is going to go fast for more than seconds.
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

  8. #23
    Registered User RINTY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Posts
    4,285
    Quote Originally Posted by BCKRIDER View Post
    Sorry to say, I don't understand either the quote or quotation that it was a reply to.
    Doug:

    My normal practise in the two lane sections is to stay in line, and I haven't had much trouble with tail gaters. I usually let fast movers by. If traffic is scattered, or I have a fast scout, I may do some passing, depending on how energetic I feel. When I get to a passing lane, I will run with the sprinting pack, and will pass some sprinters, as long as I can keep the speed under B.C.'s vehicle confiscation limit. If the pack is running over that limit, I just stay in the pack.

    But there are different ways of riding it. I know one guy, an Ambassador actually, who rides the whole thing on the shoulder, at 90 km.

    The nice thing about running it on a BMW is that you have lots of power, and good visibility. It's not so easy in my Subaru. But I've noticed the last few years that TCH traffic seems to be moving at a brisker pace, overall.

    You guys have been a tremendous help...DickNCa
    We've enjoyed helping you. For many of us, the Kootenays are our favourite corner of Canada.

    it always baffles me....MCMXVCIVRS
    +1
    Last edited by rinty; 03-23-2013 at 03:51 PM.
    Rinty

    "When you don't know where you're going, any road will get you there."

  9. #24
    Registered User DickNCA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    San Francisco East Bay
    Posts
    34
    Quote Originally Posted by rinty View Post

    When I get to a passing lane, I will run with the sprinting pack, and will pass some sprinters, as long as I can keep the speed under B.C.'s vehicle confiscation limit. If the pack is running over that limit, I just stay in the pack.
    Vehicle confiscation limit??? I sure would hate to have to take a bus home because my bike got confiscated by the Mounties! Here in the U.S. if you get caught really speeding like 15 mph over the limit I think fines are doubled and the points on your drivers license record are doubled, but I have never heard of anyone getting their vehicle confiscated! What would be considered the "vehicle confiscation limit"?

  10. #25
    Registered User RINTY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Posts
    4,285
    Quote Originally Posted by DickNCa View Post
    Vehicle confiscation limit??? I sure would hate to have to take a bus home because my bike got confiscated by the Mounties! Here in the U.S. if you get caught really speeding like 15 mph over the limit I think fines are doubled and the points on your drivers license record are doubled, but I have never heard of anyone getting their vehicle confiscated! What would be considered the "vehicle confiscation limit"?
    Dick:

    It's 40 km over the posted speed limit. This is B.C., Canada's Left Coast: think Kalifornia North - you get the idea.

    So you'll want to stay under 80 mph in the 90 km / hr zones, and 87 mph in the 100 km zones. Now here's the good news: the Mounties don't make you pay on the spot, like the state troopers do, so whether you want to pay later may depend on your state's reciprocity arrangement with the province, and how soon you intend to return. Also, the officer's decision of whether to confiscate the vehicle is discretionary, and you have the advantage of not being a Canadian, and being a tourist to boot, so they may go easy on you. Most of the RCMP are young, and are pretty good guys. Like with any trooper, you treat them with respect, and try to get your helmet off as soon as you can, so they can see that you're not a squid.
    Last edited by rinty; 03-23-2013 at 06:34 PM.
    Rinty

    "When you don't know where you're going, any road will get you there."

  11. #26
    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    749

    One other warning

    B.C. has extremely tough drinking and driving laws. If you are stopped for any reason and an officer smells alcohol on your breath, you will likely be asked "to blow." If you blow 0.05, your vehicle can be impounded. (Note that 0.08 BAC is the legal limit almost everywhere else.)

    Of course the best policy is to not drink at all if you are going to ride, but some folk do. Just bear in mind that a couple pints with lunch would most likely put you "over the limit." I haven't read of this being enforced with tourists, nor have I read that it is NOT enforced. Just information on how B.C. differs from the norm.
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

  12. #27
    Registered User DickNCA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    San Francisco East Bay
    Posts
    34
    Quote Originally Posted by rinty View Post
    Dick:

    It's 40 km over the posted speed limit. This is B.C., Canada's Left Coast: think Kalifornia North - you get the idea.

    So you'll want to stay under 80 mph in the 90 km / hr zones, and 87 mph in the 100 km zones.
    Quote Originally Posted by BCKRIDER View Post
    B.C. has extremely tough drinking and driving laws. If you are stopped for any reason and an officer smells alcohol on your breath, you will likely be asked "to blow." If you blow 0.05, your vehicle can be impounded. (Note that 0.08 BAC is the legal limit almost everywhere else.)
    Good info! I never drink and ride but I will sure make sure the rest of our group knows the law in BC. Speed law seems reasonable. I think here the officer might consider that kind of excess speed as reckless driving which could cause your vehicle to be impounded a ride to town in the back of his police car.

    Thanks for the info.

    Dick

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •