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Thread: 90 Years in 90 Seconds

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    90 Years in 90 Seconds

    This is a pretty cool video, I thought it was worth sharing.

    Mark E

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    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
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    Smile

    AWESOME!!!

    Kevin Greenwald - Touring Tips Editor
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    Registered User kentuvman's Avatar
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    BMW Motorrad - 90 years in 90 seconds

    Kurt,
    You'll probably move this but since it's such a cool video and features mostly airheads, thought it should be shared here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3hk1Z...ature=youtu.be
    Ken Tuvman
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    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    Nicely done. Too bad BMW didn't use it for their "TV" commercial instead of the one they did use...



    Here's an older one.

    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

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    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lmo1131 View Post
    Nicely done. Too bad BMW didn't use it for their "TV" commercial instead of the one they did use...



    Here's an older one.

    Geez........I liked the one with the fan
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    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
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    That son of yours....

    the dare devil ...he's always on that motorcycle reving the engine....

    Saw this one the other night.... peel your eyes and tell me if you see what I see....

    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

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    Registered User argent brick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marke View Post
    This is a pretty cool video, I thought it was worth sharing.

    Mark E
    Yes it is worth watching, but I did not see any flying bricks. Did I miss something?
    Lynn
    MOA #57883
    Current Ride: 1995 K75 Standard
    Past: 1978 Yamaha XS 750, 1976 BMW R60/6

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    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ARGENT BRICK View Post
    Yes it is worth watching, but I did not see any flying bricks. Did I miss something?
    Apparently, someone at BMW AG places the K-bikes right up there with years 1936 thru 1945.
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    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ARGENT BRICK View Post
    Yes it is worth watching, but I did not see any flying bricks. Did I miss something?
    You probably missed checking the sales figures.

    The large amount of the 90 seconds devoted to the R80G/S demonstrates accurately that BMW is a GS company and a boxer twin company.

    Omission of much in the way of R90S would reflect its not-so-stellar success in the crotch rocket market, although it's making a comeback with a bike NOT named K, i.e. S1000RR.

    It's good to recall that 1984 saw BMW calling the boxers "last editions" and that R80G/S sales were not so hot either. Introduction of the fairly flawed Ks convinced BMWs customers they were not ready to give up boxers as BMW thought they should, and the rest is history and the R100GS saved the division.
    Kent Christensen
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    Cannonball Rider #52 darrylri's Avatar
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    Actually, there's a couple K1 shots -- clearly, the bikes selected are not based just on sales figures! And in fact, it looked to me like the K1 shots were much longer than the total of all the Wedge K shots.

    Also, there are several racing shots from the late 30s. I can't tell precisely, but it could well be picturing Schorsch Mayer at the '39 Isle of Man TT. The 30s were a period of huge development for BMW's bikes.
    --Darryl Richman, forum liaison
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    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lkchris View Post
    You probably missed checking the sales figures.

    The large amount of the 90 seconds devoted to the R80G/S demonstrates accurately that BMW is a GS company and a boxer twin company.

    Omission of much in the way of R90S would reflect its not-so-stellar success in the crotch rocket market, although it's making a comeback with a bike NOT named K, i.e. S1000RR.

    It's good to recall that 1984 saw BMW calling the boxers "last editions" and that R80G/S sales were not so hot either. Introduction of the fairly flawed Ks convinced BMWs customers they were not ready to give up boxers as BMW thought they should, and the rest is history and the R100GS saved the division.
    Geez.........I never knew the company was "saved" by the GS line. No wonder Cadillac spends its time selling pimped out Suburbans to Sunbelt dwellers that just have to have 4WD to traverse the terrain to the Mall.

    As one of those lowly types with fond memories of the inadequate k75 I owned for 13-yrs, I guess I'm sorry I led the company astray from its destiny as the builder of 2-wheeled Hummers.

    There..........how many folks did I manage to offend with that little rant........
    Last edited by 36654; 03-12-2013 at 06:21 PM.
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    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarrylRi View Post
    The 30s were a period of huge development for BMW's bikes.
    The German government was providing support. Winning races was part of the propaganda effort.

    In addition, motorcycles were a critical element in the German deployment of light infantry forces.
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    Cannonball Rider #52 darrylri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    The German government was providing support. Winning races was part of the propaganda effort.

    In addition, motorcycles were a critical element in the German deployment of light infantry forces.
    True, but even before the German government got into it, and during the depths of the Great Depression, BMW was spending a lot of their own money on the effort.

    Beginning in 1929, BMW was going out after, and capturing, land speed records. Between 1929 and 1937, BMW owned the land speed record 5 times, getting up to 173 mph.

    Also, each year from 1930 to 1934, the R11 and R16 models got significant upgrades. If you're interested in owning one of these bikes, it's very difficult to get one that is all of one year, because BMW was making so many changes along the way.

    And then, there's the fabulous art deco R7 that BMW was working on during 1934 -- a bike they developed to a preproduction prototype level and then dropped. Although it looks similar to the R16 and R17 models that surrounded it, it actually had new tooling for just about everything. The drivetrain was hung from a backbone frame, and it presaged the first ever oil damped telescopic forks that appeared on the R12/R17 bikes.

    When the R12/R17 were introduced in 1935, they were really only intended to be one or two year models, because BMW was already developing the R5, a completely clean sheet design. It was introduced in 1936, but it had already been seen in BMW's racing program. BMW continued to update that model each year and then produced the R51 with a rear suspension in 1938.

    So, the early to mid thirties were very active times at BMW, which mostly predates the government's involvement.

    And while motorcycles were bought in big numbers for the Wehrmacht, from BMW they mostly bought the outdated R12, in preference over the newer R71 (which was built on the plan of the R51). They continued to buy the R12 into 1941; then bought a relatively small number of R71s, as a stopgap until the R75WH, a purpose built sidecar machine with a dual range transmission and a lockable differential for two wheel drive, finally became available late in 1941.
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  14. #14
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarrylRi View Post
    True, but even before the German government got into it, and during the depths of the Great Depression, BMW was spending a lot of their own money on the effort.

    Beginning in 1929, BMW was going out after, and capturing, land speed records. Between 1929 and 1937, BMW owned the land speed record 5 times, getting up to 173 mph.

    Also, each year from 1930 to 1934, the R11 and R16 models got significant upgrades. If you're interested in owning one of these bikes, it's very difficult to get one that is all of one year, because BMW was making so many changes along the way.

    And then, there's the fabulous art deco R7 that BMW was working on during 1934 -- a bike they developed to a preproduction prototype level and then dropped. Although it looks similar to the R16 and R17 models that surrounded it, it actually had new tooling for just about everything. The drivetrain was hung from a backbone frame, and it presaged the first ever oil damped telescopic forks that appeared on the R12/R17 bikes.

    When the R12/R17 were introduced in 1935, they were really only intended to be one or two year models, because BMW was already developing the R5, a completely clean sheet design. It was introduced in 1936, but it had already been seen in BMW's racing program. BMW continued to update that model each year and then produced the R51 with a rear suspension in 1938.

    So, the early to mid thirties were very active times at BMW, which mostly predates the government's involvement.

    And while motorcycles were bought in big numbers for the Wehrmacht, from BMW they mostly bought the outdated R12, in preference over the newer R71 (which was built on the plan of the R51). They continued to buy the R12 into 1941; then bought a relatively small number of R71s, as a stopgap until the R75WH, a purpose built sidecar machine with a dual range transmission and a lockable differential for two wheel drive, finally became available late in 1941.
    The enabling act of 1933 made Adolph Hitler dictator of the Reich. The racing efforts at BMW, NSU and Mercedes were used in the government propaganda. Remember, the party was the national socialists......the party was integrated with the middle class and business to promote the economy and prevent the communists and anarchists from coming to power.

    Is that bad? I can't say, but it is the model that the US has used since the end of WW-II for our defense industry efforts and government supported research (DoD, DoE, NASA, NSF, NIH) at government, university and private labs and facilities.

    Trying to delineate the events in germany, from 1933 to the end of the war, from the Nazi's is typically an effort in picking a better shade of lipstick for the pig.
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    Cannonball Rider #52 darrylri's Avatar
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    It cannot be denied (not that I was denying it) that the Nazi government insinuated itself into all the manufacturing industries. BMW's board was purged of Jews and those who weren't party members. In the late 30s, all transportation manufacturers adopted common guidelines for parts numbering, anticipating the huge need for organizing supplies during the coming war (for example, a leading 2 on a part number indicated a part was intended for a motorcycle).

    But as I pointed out, BMW was already on a trajectory of racing, land speed records and continuous improvement of their products, in spite of the Great Depression, before the Nazis grasped the levers of power.

    I was also trying to point out that, while the German government certainly was contributing to and in significant was controlling BMW's driection, what BMW produced was not necessarily what the government and the army wanted. It wasn't until the army had already reached its fullest advance that BMW (and Z??ndapp) began production of motorcycles expressly designed to support the war effort.
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